Philips puts HomeKit-compatible Hue White Ambiance candle light up for preorder

Posted:
in General Discussion
Adding to an ever expanding list of products compatible with Apple's HomeKit, Philips on Tuesday activated preorders for the Hue White Ambiance 40W-equivalent candle bulb.




Up for order on Philips' website for $29.95, the candle-shaped bulb sports an E12 base for use in smaller sockets like those found in ceiling fans and decorative lighting fixtures. The internet-connected light was first announced in May alongside two Hue table lamps.

Philips initially rolled out candle-style lights with the E14 bulb in March.

Like other products in the White Ambiance line, the Hue E12 candle light communicates with Philips' Hue hub for wireless control both in and out of the house. The 40W-equivalent bulb is capable of outputting up to 450 lumens in color temperatures ranging from 2200k warm white to to 6500k cool daylight.

With HomeKit macro control, users are able to apply scenes to Hue bulbs. For example, an E12 candle light-equipped lamp might be programmed to automatically simulate sunlight in the morning, cool white light at dusk and relaxing warm light before bed.

Since its launch in 2014, Apple's HomeKit platform has grown to cover a variety of connected devices including lights, cameras, doorbells and more. With iOS 11, Apple is expanding functionality to allow for more complex triggers. In addition, the company is changing policy to accelerate adoption. For example, developers can now experiment on prototype devices without first obtaining an MFi license, while HomeKit itself will soon allow for hardware authentication through software.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    tofinodpkroh
  • Reply 2 of 18
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 902member
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    They gotta leave something for iOS 12…
  • Reply 3 of 18
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 670editor
    To be really clear: the bulb is not HomeKit compatible - the bulb itself is zigbee. The Philips Hue Bridge bridges zigbee bulbs to HomeKit using an ethernet port on your home router.
  • Reply 4 of 18
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,791member
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    If its a white bulb to begin with its not going to change colors, even if its a different shade of white. Thats all about the type of LED inside the bulb. If you have a white LED smart bulb that only puts out a blue'ish white, you most likely cannot change it to put out a yellowish white. Maybe I'm misunderstanding?

    Also, I can use the Home app to change the colors of my Hue Color bulbs. This has been there from day 1. I'm sure other bulbs have this capability too. 
  • Reply 5 of 18
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,096member
    we need 1600 lumen white bulbs, please. For bright lamps...
  • Reply 6 of 18
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 421member
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 7 of 18
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    macxpress said:
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    If its a white bulb to begin with its not going to change colors, even if its a different shade of white. Thats all about the type of LED inside the bulb. If you have a white LED smart bulb that only puts out a blue'ish white, you most likely cannot change it to put out a yellowish white. Maybe I'm misunderstanding?

    Also, I can use the Home app to change the colors of my Hue Color bulbs. This has been there from day 1. I'm sure other bulbs have this capability too. 
    You are probably misunderstanding. He put "color" in quote marks, because you can change the colour temperature of the white ambience bulbs from some HomeKit compatible apps, but not the home app itself like you can with the multi colour versions. I use Elgato's Eve app to change the colour temperature, but it's a clunky workaround. 
  • Reply 8 of 18
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member

    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.
    Duct tape fixes everything! : ) 
  • Reply 9 of 18
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,791member
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.
    Simple solution...

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerelle-Switch-Guards-2-Pack-CSG1/100628705
    tofino
  • Reply 10 of 18
    dpkrohdpkroh Posts: 14member
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    I feel your pain. I have the white ambiance bulbs, over 50 of them (I have 2 hubs) through every rom in my house.  Using scenes is a bit of a workaround, but that comes with its own problems.

    I'm hoping since IKEA has just got into the smart bulb game that this will change soon.  IKEA does not have colour lights, but they do have white ambiance.  They have also announced plans to make their system HomeKit compatible in the near future.  With IKEA driving mass consumption of such bulbs, a LOT more people should start complaining about the lack of white colour temperature control.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    dpkrohdpkroh Posts: 14member
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    IKEA is now in the smart bulb game, as has announced near future HomeKit compatibility. Their bulbs are either fixed white at 2700K, or an adjustable white temperature versions. They promote the white colour temperature control as a key feature.  They do not offer colour bulbs. Hopefully mass market use of white colour temperature bulbs on HomeKit will prompt Apple to address this issue.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    dpkrohdpkroh Posts: 14member
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.

    I have Hue bulbs in every room of my house.  More than 65 bulbs requiring the use of 2 bridges.  At first I thought I would want to prevent access to the actual power switches, but they come in very handy.  When you want to flick on the lights, and don't immediately have a smart device to interface with, a power on-off results in the bulbs turning on immediately, after this "reboot". This is very handy for moments when you don't have a smart device on you, or for guests.

    Since Hue bulbs can be "buggy" requiring occasional power on - off "reboots" instant access to the power switches is hepful in this situation as well.  The packing tape resists movement of the swich, but press hard enough and the switch turns off, only to return to the on position as soon as released.  Enough tension to prevent casual accidental use of the power switch, yet very convenient quick and easy "re-boot"
    tofino
  • Reply 13 of 18
    dpkrohdpkroh Posts: 14member
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.
    I did a little more searching on the web, and have found what seems to be the perfect solution.  It looks to prevent accidental use of the switch, while also allowing deliberate use.  By default a small tool is needed to activate the switch. Optionally the access hole can be made just large enough for deliberate finger tip access.  It screws on with the switch mount screws, so can be used on any custom combination of "multi-gang" switch box arrangements.

    http://switchshield.com/?page_id=40






    tofino
  • Reply 14 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,157member
    macxpress said:
    dchender said:
    Just wish Apple's Home app allowed you to change "color" of white ambiance lights ... maybe IOS 11?
    If its a white bulb to begin with its not going to change colors, even if its a different shade of white. Thats all about the type of LED inside the bulb. If you have a white LED smart bulb that only puts out a blue'ish white, you most likely cannot change it to put out a yellowish white. Maybe I'm misunderstanding?

    Also, I can use the Home app to change the colors of my Hue Color bulbs. This has been there from day 1. I'm sure other bulbs have this capability too. 
    It's a Hue White Ambiance bulb. This line can change 'color' as in color temperature from approximately 2700K-6500K.

    You can use the Philips Hue website to gain a working knowledge of their lineup.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,157member
    we need 1600 lumen white bulbs, please. For bright lamps...
    Indeed. With the current 800lm max and only at 4000K, I'd take anything 1000lm or more.
  • Reply 16 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,157member
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? 
    Proper discipline, starting with mandatory viewing of 50 Shades of Grey ?

    Have you provided a local method of controlling frequently used lights? Decades of muscle memory is a hard thing to remap/remaster.

    I got a Hue Kit with a wireless remote and put a piece of tape over the regular wall switch. After six months I still try to use it once in a while.

    My ultimate fix may be to remove some wall switches, wire the light On inside the electrical box and install one of the Hue dimmer panels. Two considerations with this: it may not be legal in your city/county/state/country and the only way then to secure power to the sockets would be through a breaker.

    Someone may now or eventually make an actual HomeKit compatible smartswitch similar to the old X10 switches that were 'push-On, push-Off' and remotely controllable. I've tried the WeMo and view them as crap. But such a switch would have to be similarly self-contained, HomeKit compatible, Hue hub compatible, or require their own hub. This would be expensive.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,157member
    macxpress said:
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's a question. For those who own networked light bulbs, how do you get everyone in the household to not flip associated light switches off, rendering the whole point of networked bulbs useless? I have a couple of lamps plugged into networked plug-in adapters, and even those required a stiff learning curve to prevent the lamps themselves from getting switched off. Replacing hard-wired wall switches that control hard-wired light fixtures seems to me to have been the only way to prevent regular disabling of networked lighting.

    Here's the scenario: the techie member of the household gets everything set up to have networked light bulbs timed to go on and off, plus the ability to switch them on and off remotely so that a simulated at-home appearance is ready to go before the two-week family vacation. After the plane lands at a destination a thousand miles away, the techie spouse learns that the non-techie spouse went through the house right before they left to check the stove and all the locks and faucets and switch off all the lights, just to be sure everything was squared away for the trip. You know this has happened out there somewhere, more than once.
    Simple solution...

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerelle-Switch-Guards-2-Pack-CSG1/100628705
    Brilliant! That's much better than my cellophane tape across the switch. I'll head out today to get a set. Thanks!
  • Reply 18 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,157member

    Ok, this is even more brilliant! If I swap out the standard flip switch for a rocker switch and use this shield with tabs removed, I don't have to rewire the box and buy more Hue dimmers.  Thank you!
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