Was that a 2.2GHz laptop or a 1.1GHz one?

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
All laptops to some extent cut speeds at certain times but perhaps this will serve as a warning for those people that look to compare and purchase cheap laptops.



<a href="http://www6.tomshardware.com/mobile/02q4/021101/index.html"; target="_blank">Dell makes crap laptops =P</a>



Somehow I don't think these would sell very well if Dell advertised this fact.



I'd be interested to know how well the G3/G4 holds its speed when running on battery because I'd be willing to bet it would do so a lot better. In fact given the G3's power requirements I wonder if it cuts speeds at all except when it is being underutilised.



[ 11-03-2002: Message edited by: Telomar ]</p>

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    To my knowledge they don't slow down the processor at all. Apple would rather the processor have low enough power requirements to run effectively in a laptop/desktop as in the case of the Ti they are the SAME processor



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  • Reply 2 of 8
    Powerbooks and iBooks do the same thing, the clock speed is just that much slower that it isn't so dramatic
  • Reply 3 of 8
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    [quote]Originally posted by Stagflation Steve:

    <strong>Powerbooks and iBooks do the same thing, the clock speed is just that much slower that it isn't so dramatic</strong><hr></blockquote>



    well they have processor cycling and also an option to reduce processor speed... I think it reduces it to a set speed on G3s and like 20 percent on G4s
  • Reply 4 of 8
    telomartelomar Posts: 1,804member
    The mobile PIV generally reduces when it isn't doing anything and I am sure the G3 and G4 do the same. What I'm not sure of is if they reduce from peak clock rates during peak operation even while under battery power.



    They definitely don't just have their clock rates halved permanently while under battery power though.
  • Reply 5 of 8
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    The PowerBook G4 800 runs at 667 if you tell it to. I don't know if the 667 has a reduced power setting.
  • Reply 6 of 8
    In sys pref&gt;energy saver you can presumably lower the processor speed through selecting "longest battery life" rather than "Fastest Performance." At least I think that's what it implies.
  • Reply 7 of 8
    eskimoeskimo Posts: 474member
    [quote]Originally posted by Telomar:

    <strong>The mobile PIV generally reduces when it isn't doing anything and I am sure the G3 and G4 do the same. What I'm not sure of is if they reduce from peak clock rates during peak operation even while under battery power.



    They definitely don't just have their clock rates halved permanently while under battery power though.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Well you certainly don't have to have it slow down if you don't want. Intel utilizes a technology known as Speed Step which does in fact lower the clock speed quite considerably (not always in 1/2 though, my P3-650 goes to 500). The default option is to have Speed Step engage whenever the laptop is on battery power and turn off when the laptop is plugged in. The user can easily change this setting to whatever they want.



    AMD has a much more granular power technology called PowerNow which will reduce the clockspeed in 50-100MHz increments to adjust to the CPU demand of the applications running. Then Transmeta has their LongRun technology which supposedly increments by 1MHz steps to match system requirements.
  • Reply 8 of 8
    If the user wants to use SpeedStep to save battery life (while unplugged), even the intermittent lower clock speeds of this processor are hundred of MHz faster than anything Apple is offering, so what's the point of this really?



    [ 11-04-2002: Message edited by: Patchouli ]</p>
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