Review: Koogeek P1 Smart Plug an affordable way to get started with Apple's HomeKit

Posted:
in iPhone
We may be in a renaissance of HomeKit peripherals after iOS 11 ships, but if you're ready to get in now, the Koogeek P1 Smart Plug is a decent starting point -- but not perfect.




The recently released Koogeek P1 Smart Plug does what it says on the packaging -- it plugs into any outlet, and converts it into a HomeKit controllable one. Fully HomeKit compatible, the hardware and app allows for schedule setting, use in Scenes, Siri control, and control from outside the house, when used in conjunction with a HomeKit Hub.

The app allows for monitoring of real-time, daily, and monthly power consumption of devices plugged into the socket -- which opens up a number of possibilities for monitoring of so-called "vampire power" consumed by power adapters.

The plug is a little chunky

Purely from a physical standpoint, the device is a little big, and can block adjacent outlets. It's also a little rough on power strips, and can block one or more adjacent plugs on device if not well positioned.




This is the case for most of the HomeKit plugs, so if this is a problem will vary very much from user to user.

iPhone SE for scale
iPhone SE for scale

Pairing process, and maintenance

Like the Koogeek Smart Socket that we previously examined, the Smart Plug does what it says it will do, just from a different side of the power supply. After registering the socket with the iPhone's camera in a quick and painless process, it will take a command from an app, and turn on or off.



But, the Koogeek ecosystem does require 2.4GHz wireless access, so if you've got that disabled in favor of only 5Ghz, you're going to have a problem. We've tested it with a Verizon FiOS router, and the Apple Airport Extreme, and haven't had any issues.

Since our last examination of the Koogeek ecosystem, the app has been polished, some. But, Firmware update notification is still a problem.

For instance, it will alert you to a firmware update with a notification, and launch the app if you tap on it. However, there's no clear way to start the firmware update. You've got to select the device, choose Detail and then it will give you the option of installing the firmware -- but what's getting installed isn't at all clear.



At least this time, the Koogeek app and hardware passed the notification that the firmware update was completed to Apple's Home app -- it took almost two weeks to do so last time.

As before, our advice is to stick with Apple's Home app -- add the accessory in the Koogeek app, and forget you've got it afterwards. But, improvements are happening to the app, with three updates to it since we reviewed the Smart Socket.

Cut the power!

As with the Smart Socket, if the plug is manually turned off electrically by a switch or by yanking it out of the wall, it will "fail shut" and re-connect when power returns in the on position, regardless of app setting. This is good, and how it should work.
Selecting what the right HomeKit device is can be problematic
However, it takes some time to update its status to either Apple's Home app, or the Koogeek app.

Ideal use cases

In the month we've lived with Smart Plug, we've used it for two main applications -- our living room light, and an entertainment center's power socket.

In the case of the former, we used a standalone lamp that we've had for years with the rotary power switch right under the bulb. On the way home, we hit the control, and we were good to go. We only got sunk once by the light being turned off at the lamp, but that was by a houseguest who wasn't aware that the particular lamp we were using was basically turned on or off once a day.

In the office, connecting a power switch to a power strip cut down power consumed by devices on standby considerably. This is known as "vampire power" or standby power.

After getting behind the entertainment center to insert the Smart Plug inline between the wall and the power strip, we cut down vampire power draws from devices that were off and on standby from 72W to 0.7W.

We're not proud about this, but we've also used it to kill power to a speaker set to summon a child who didn't respond to calls to eat. After complaints about that tactic, we've used it as a "last call" connected to a light to blink it remotely as an attention-getter.

One step closer

HomeKit is best as an all-or-nothing system, ideally with everybody in the house educated on how the system works. The most refined smart setups can be defeated by a power switch killing electricity to the HomeKit device by a well-intentioned guest, as we demonstrated. This is hard on a bulb-only system, but can be controlled by a Smart Plug's location -- so less of an issue in this regard.

Possibly good, and possibly bad, if you've killed power to a device at the Smart Plug with your phone, somebody who wants to turn power on is out of luck unless they pull the socket out of the wall, and plug it back in.

Selecting what the right HomeKit device is can be problematic. There are situations where a smart bulb is good, more times where the Smart Plug P1 works well, but the ultimate HomeKit control besides a paired device itself is a light switch -- and that is yet another review.

If you're going to use HomeKit devices, realize that not everybody in the house wants to go to a phone to turn a socket on or off. That, and we still want the app cleaned up.

Score: 3.5 out of 5

image

Where to buy

The Koogeek P1 Smart Plug is currently available from Amazon.com for $30 in either black or white color options.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    bocaboybocaboy Posts: 26member
    Skip the Koogeek and stick with either TP-Link or WeMo, in that order. I've been using these switches for a couple years now. I have the plug-in and wall switch from both vendors. My recommendation tips towards TP-Link. Their wireless reception performs better where a WiFi signal isn't very strong. In areas where WiFi reception is good, both are equally good. Every device I have connected to either a TP-Link or WeMo is controlled by Amazon Echo and allows for a completely automated home.

    Here a couple other things to consider when deciding on a vendor.
    1. When the WeMo devices need to update their firmware, be prepared to have to reprogram your entire system, one by one. The process that Belkin engineers have instituted to update these devices is on the verge of sinister. In over two years of using WeMos, I've never had an update go smoothly.
    2. TP-Link has the exact same automatic programming choices as WeMo except one: the switch can't be automated to turn on or off relative to sunrise or sunset. As an example, I have two lamps that I want turned on 15 minutes prior to sunset. TP-Link can only turn them on/off at either a specific time or exactly at sunrise/sunset.
    3. TP-Link is less expensive, especially from Amazon.
    4. TP-Link customer service blows away Belkin. If you have a problem, TP-Link responds very quickly and don't hesitate to replace a problematic product. I had a couple TP-Link powerline connectors that went bad, and TP-Link replaced them promptly with no fuss. On the other hand, dealing with Belkin is like talking to the DMV. They really aren't approachable and really don't care about customer input.
    5. A minor design feature, but one that you may find important. If you ever find that you need to access a switch that is behind a bed stand or other furniture, the WeMo off/on switch is on the top and easy to reach, even blindly. The TP-Link is on the front, and more difficult to reach.
    When all is said and done, TP-Link is my preferred product. It's ability to be more tenacious in holding on to a weak wireless signal and not being fussy during upgrades are the two reasons I use them. The sunrise/sunset problem will hopefully be fixed in a future update of their Kasa app. Either way, both can be controlled by an Echo, which is way more functional than Homekit. 
    xzuamarkaplorin schultz
  • Reply 2 of 29
    teejay2012teejay2012 Posts: 274member
    bocaboy said:
    Skip the Koogeek and stick with either TP-Link or WeMo, in that order. I've been using these switches for a couple years now. I have the plug-in and wall switch from both vendors. My recommendation tips towards TP-Link. Their wireless reception performs better where a WiFi signal isn't very strong. In areas where WiFi reception is good, both are equally good. Every device I have connected to either a TP-Link or WeMo is controlled by Amazon Echo and allows for a completely automated home.

    When all is said and done, TP-Link is my preferred product. It's ability to be more tenacious in holding on to a weak wireless signal and not being fussy during upgrades are the two reasons I use them. The sunrise/sunset problem will hopefully be fixed in a future update of their Kasa app. Either way, both can be controlled by an Echo, which is way more functional than Homekit. 
    Uh.. This article is about Homekit. TP-Link and WeMo make good hardware but they do not work with Homekit directly, and require users to set up Homebridge - not for the technically timid.

    We have Koogeek and iHome devices, and they all have equivalent glitches in terms of firmware updating, and becoming 'unavailable' or 'updating' at random times, which could be related to our complicated Apple hardware based network (many Expresses to 'extend'). We still have a few lights controlled with ancient X10 devices and ironically they are more stable than our Homekit stuff - but we wanted to have ability to control some of the lights away from home.


    Soliindyfxmike1jahblade
  • Reply 3 of 29
    amarkapamarkap Posts: 54member
    bocaboy said:
    Skip the Koogeek and stick with either TP-Link or WeMo, in that order. I've been using these switches for a couple years now. I have the plug-in and wall switch from both vendors. My recommendation tips towards TP-Link. Their wireless reception performs better where a WiFi signal isn't very strong. In areas where WiFi reception is good, both are equally good. Every device I have connected to either a TP-Link or WeMo is controlled by Amazon Echo and allows for a completely automated home.

    When all is said and done, TP-Link is my preferred product. It's ability to be more tenacious in holding on to a weak wireless signal and not being fussy during upgrades are the two reasons I use them. The sunrise/sunset problem will hopefully be fixed in a future update of their Kasa app. Either way, both can be controlled by an Echo, which is way more functional than Homekit. 
    Uh.. This article is about Homekit. TP-Link and WeMo make good hardware but they do not work with Homekit directly, and require users to set up Homebridge - not for the technically timid.

    We have Koogeek and iHome devices, and they all have equivalent glitches in terms of firmware updating, and becoming 'unavailable' or 'updating' at random times, which could be related to our complicated Apple hardware based network (many Expresses to 'extend'). We still have a few lights controlled with ancient X10 devices and ironically they are more stable than our Homekit stuff - but we wanted to have ability to control some of the lights away from home.


    Uh...just because an article is about HomeKit doesn't mean every comment has to be about HomeKit and HomeKit specific products.  Bocaboy comment was acceptable and informative.  As well, I appreciate your informative comment.

    Regarding this technology, I think it all has a way to go.  All this stuff is just a bit too complicated to setup and configure.  Eventually Home Builders/Contractors will be hired to setup your home with the necessary outlets/switches so every outlet is compatible and WiFi signal is strong at all parts of your home.  Then it is just a matter of plugging devices in and attaching them to your phone (if you wanted too).  We are not there yet and thus this technology is just for the select few that get into this stuff.  

    I have two lamps in my home that have timers attached to them to come on in the evenings and shut off around 10:00PM.  Yes, a few times a year I have to readjust the setting but it is fine.  It works and costs less than $10.00.


    anantksundaramwilliamlondon
  • Reply 4 of 29
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,061member
    All of these 'solutions' are the equivalent of dropping a piano to kill an insect. 

    No thanks, I'll wait a couple of years. 
    amarkaprandominternetpersonjahblade
  • Reply 5 of 29
    amarkap said:
    bocaboy said:
    Skip the Koogeek and stick with either TP-Link or WeMo, in that order. I've been using these switches for a couple years now. I have the plug-in and wall switch from both vendors. My recommendation tips towards TP-Link. Their wireless reception performs better where a WiFi signal isn't very strong. In areas where WiFi reception is good, both are equally good. Every device I have connected to either a TP-Link or WeMo is controlled by Amazon Echo and allows for a completely automated home.

    When all is said and done, TP-Link is my preferred product. It's ability to be more tenacious in holding on to a weak wireless signal and not being fussy during upgrades are the two reasons I use them. The sunrise/sunset problem will hopefully be fixed in a future update of their Kasa app. Either way, both can be controlled by an Echo, which is way more functional than Homekit. 
    Uh.. This article is about Homekit. TP-Link and WeMo make good hardware but they do not work with Homekit directly, and require users to set up Homebridge - not for the technically timid.

    We have Koogeek and iHome devices, and they all have equivalent glitches in terms of firmware updating, and becoming 'unavailable' or 'updating' at random times, which could be related to our complicated Apple hardware based network (many Expresses to 'extend'). We still have a few lights controlled with ancient X10 devices and ironically they are more stable than our Homekit stuff - but we wanted to have ability to control some of the lights away from home.


    Uh...just because an article is about HomeKit doesn't mean every comment has to be about HomeKit and HomeKit specific products.  Bocaboy comment was acceptable and informative.  As well, I appreciate your informative comment.

    Regarding this technology, I think it all has a way to go.  All this stuff is just a bit too complicated to setup and configure.  Eventually Home Builders/Contractors will be hired to setup your home with the necessary outlets/switches so every outlet is compatible and WiFi signal is strong at all parts of your home.  Then it is just a matter of plugging devices in and attaching them to your phone (if you wanted too).  We are not there yet and thus this technology is just for the select few that get into this stuff.  

    I have two lamps in my home that have timers attached to them to come on in the evenings and shut off around 10:00PM.  Yes, a few times a year I have to readjust the setting but it is fine.  It works and costs less than $10.00.


    No, I think you're absolutely and utterly wrong. This article and thread is about HomeKit only. Of course there are other alternatives, including stupid timers you plug into the wall that turn on/off based on a simple dial, but I don't want to read about those here, nor do I want when the title is "HomeKit" to hear about anything that isn't HomeKit as well. Pick another thread if you want to discuss non-HomeKit products, but I'd suggest at that point, perhaps this forum/site isn't the best for that either.
    teejay2012jahblade
  • Reply 6 of 29
    teejay2012teejay2012 Posts: 274member
    amarkap said:
    Uh...just because an article is about HomeKit doesn't mean every comment has to be about HomeKit and HomeKit specific products.  Bocaboy comment was acceptable and informative.  As well, I appreciate your informative comment.


    I have two lamps in my home that have timers attached to them to come on in the evenings and shut off around 10:00PM.  Yes, a few times a year I have to readjust the setting but it is fine.  It works and costs less than $10.00.


    The topic is Homekit and Koogeek P1 - which I own and use. In forums, it is polite to stay on topic. The comment made was 'off topic' and might mislead some into thinking that TP-link and WeMo are Homekit compatible, which I wanted to correct. As to which system is 'better', well that's another topic. :)
    williamlondonbshankjahbladetofino
  • Reply 7 of 29
    AplusAplus Posts: 5member
    We've been using them for a year or so with the lower price being the main attraction. I didn't install the Koogeek app, just added them directly by scanning the sticker using the HomeKit app. No Koogeek app means no firmware updates, but since they worked right out of the box and have kept working through power cuts, etc this seems a simpler way to go unless you encounter problems. We are using the always-awesome Apple AirPort Extreme, so your mileage may vary. I like them. Does what it says it will do with no fuss.
    williamlondonwatto_cobrajahblade
  • Reply 8 of 29
    Aplus said:
    We've been using them for a year or so with the lower price being the main attraction. I didn't install the Koogeek app, just added them directly by scanning the sticker using the HomeKit app. No Koogeek app means no firmware updates, but since they worked right out of the box and have kept working through power cuts, etc this seems a simpler way to go unless you encounter problems. We are using the always-awesome Apple AirPort Extreme, so your mileage may vary. I like them. Does what it says it will do with no fuss.
    Thanks for this, that's very good to know. Live in a small apartment here and not much opportunity to install big HomeKit accessories, but something simple like this (which seems much cheaper than other more comprehensive alternatives) which can be used and is working well for others is actually rather exciting.

    BTW, welcome to the forum!
  • Reply 9 of 29
    Aplus said:
    We've been using them for a year or so with the lower price being the main attraction. I didn't install the Koogeek app, just added them directly by scanning the sticker using the HomeKit app. No Koogeek app means no firmware updates, but since they worked right out of the box and have kept working through power cuts, etc this seems a simpler way to go unless you encounter problems. We are using the always-awesome Apple AirPort Extreme, so your mileage may vary. I like them. Does what it says it will do with no fuss.
    Thanks for this, that's very good to know. Live in a small apartment here and not much opportunity to install big HomeKit accessories, but something simple like this (which seems much cheaper than other more comprehensive alternatives) which can be used and is working well for others is actually rather exciting.

    BTW, welcome to the forum!
    One feature of the Koogeek app (besides firmware updates) is that it provides basic power consumption information, including current watts being consumed. Not something that I use, but of interest to some for sure. Another point about them. While they are easy to set up generally, things sometimes do not work first time, and I have had to reset them. To reset a Koogeek, you need to hold the power button in while inserting into power, and hold down for a good 10 seconds - LED flashes and changes color. Then to add it to your network, go to Settings->WiFi and find the device which will appear like a WiFi station, 'click on it' to add it to your network, and then you will be instructed to add its code to complete. They are ok devices and a bit cheaper than others, but Koogeek does not have easy to find detailed instructions if first attempt does not work. I have 4 of them and they work well for the most part, although they seem to go 'offline' once in a while - unplug and plug and things right themselves. Welcome to Homekit, the early days!
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 29
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,349administrator
    Aplus said:
    We've been using them for a year or so with the lower price being the main attraction. I didn't install the Koogeek app, just added them directly by scanning the sticker using the HomeKit app. No Koogeek app means no firmware updates, but since they worked right out of the box and have kept working through power cuts, etc this seems a simpler way to go unless you encounter problems. We are using the always-awesome Apple AirPort Extreme, so your mileage may vary. I like them. Does what it says it will do with no fuss.
    That's good, I'm glad you're having a great experience!

    However, Apple themselves don't recommend this approach because of the Firmware update issue. Firmware updates provide more than just functionality fixes -- it also rectifies security problems.
    watto_cobrabshank
  • Reply 11 of 29
    amarkapamarkap Posts: 54member
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     

    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    anantksundaramwilliamlondon
  • Reply 12 of 29
    teejay2012teejay2012 Posts: 274member
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     

    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    I think you are making this into something bigger than it deserves. The author talked about Koogeek as being a good entry into Homekit. I agree. Bocaboy did not have an opinion about Koogeek (I suspect he has not used one) apart from advising us to stay away from Homekit, and promoting 'another' home automation system and several devices that do not work with Homekit. Really? I pointed  this out in my post and suggested we comment about Koogeek and Homekit, to be of use to those who have an interest in Koogeek switches. I am sure that AI will (or has had) articles comparing Homekit and the other systems mentioned.  I would welcome comments on merits of each by someone who had actually used both, in an objective comparison - not some glib dismissal of Koogeek without supporting facts or personal experience. I think it is great that we have choices in home automation and hope that prices will come down with competition from companies like Koogeek. I liked the article :)
    amarkapwilliamlondontofino
  • Reply 13 of 29
    amarkapamarkap Posts: 54member
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     
    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    I think you are making this into something bigger than it deserves. The author talked about Koogeek as being a good entry into Homekit. I agree. Bocaboy did not have an opinion about Koogeek (I suspect he has not used one) apart from advising us to stay away from Homekit, and promoting 'another' home automation system and several devices that do not work with Homekit. Really? I pointed  this out in my post and suggested we comment about Koogeek and Homekit, to be of use to those who have an interest in Koogeek switches. I am sure that AI will (or has had) articles comparing Homekit and the other systems mentioned.  I would welcome comments on merits of each by someone who had actually used both, in an objective comparison - not some glib dismissal of Koogeek without supporting facts or personal experience. I think it is great that we have choices in home automation and hope that prices will come down with competition from companies like Koogeek. I liked the article :)
    Teejay2012 your points and comments are always informative.  I appreciate all of them.  I was simply letting the other poster know that I was not "absolutely and utterly wrong" when I mentioned that Bocaboy comments are allowed.  They are within guidelines of these forums.  

    They may not be want we want them to be, they may not be factually true, they may mislead others, and they may be considered off-topic but they are allowed and could be of value to someone. Thankfully your helpful posts will counter any information contained in Bocaboy's posts.  :smile:  For that, I do thank you Teejay2012.

    Thank you,
  • Reply 14 of 29
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     

    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    Are you kidding me? This is utterly ridiculous (not you, *this* whole conversation). I would consider the posts into non-HomeKit stuff to be more than a slight diversion, number one and two above are being interpreted by you to be whatever you want them to mean, that's quite obvious, and as for number 3, you are way, way, way off here. It really annoys me when people cry foul when there is none, no logical fallacy, nothing I wouldn't say to your face, if you think that wasn't civil, I'd just suggest you couldn't be more wrong.

    Keep on topic and we'll be fine and don't claim fouls when there are none, because they're far too important not to dilute falsely when there actually *is* an ad hominem or incivility (which happens far too often on sites like this). And lastly, if you have a problem, go to the mods, don't pick up the rules and claim *you* are the law, it's really quite insulting, which I think is rather ironic considering your claim of foul above in #3.

    Now let's get back on topic and discuss these new HomeKit offerings.
  • Reply 15 of 29
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,852member
    bocaboy said:
    Skip the Koogeek and stick with either TP-Link or WeMo, in that order. I've been using these switches for a couple years now. I have the plug-in and wall switch from both vendors. My recommendation tips towards TP-Link. Their wireless reception performs better where a WiFi signal isn't very strong. In areas where WiFi reception is good, both are equally good. Every device I have connected to either a TP-Link or WeMo is controlled by Amazon Echo and allows for a completely automated home.

    Here a couple other things to consider when deciding on a vendor.
    1. When the WeMo devices need to update their firmware, be prepared to have to reprogram your entire system, one by one. The process that Belkin engineers have instituted to update these devices is on the verge of sinister. In over two years of using WeMos, I've never had an update go smoothly.
    2. TP-Link has the exact same automatic programming choices as WeMo except one: the switch can't be automated to turn on or off relative to sunrise or sunset. As an example, I have two lamps that I want turned on 15 minutes prior to sunset. TP-Link can only turn them on/off at either a specific time or exactly at sunrise/sunset.
    3. TP-Link is less expensive, especially from Amazon.
    4. TP-Link customer service blows away Belkin. If you have a problem, TP-Link responds very quickly and don't hesitate to replace a problematic product. I had a couple TP-Link powerline connectors that went bad, and TP-Link replaced them promptly with no fuss. On the other hand, dealing with Belkin is like talking to the DMV. They really aren't approachable and really don't care about customer input.
    5. A minor design feature, but one that you may find important. If you ever find that you need to access a switch that is behind a bed stand or other furniture, the WeMo off/on switch is on the top and easy to reach, even blindly. The TP-Link is on the front, and more difficult to reach.
    When all is said and done, TP-Link is my preferred product. It's ability to be more tenacious in holding on to a weak wireless signal and not being fussy during upgrades are the two reasons I use them. The sunrise/sunset problem will hopefully be fixed in a future update of their Kasa app. Either way, both can be controlled by an Echo, which is way more functional than Homekit. 
    Belkin has announced that HomeKit support for Wemo is finally "coming soon". Can't happen soon enough.
  • Reply 16 of 29
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,061member
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     

    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    Are you kidding me? This is utterly ridiculous (not you, *this* whole conversation). I would consider the posts into non-HomeKit stuff to be more than a slight diversion, number one and two above are being interpreted by you to be whatever you want them to mean, that's quite obvious, and as for number 3, you are way, way, way off here. It really annoys me when people cry foul when there is none, no logical fallacy, nothing I wouldn't say to your face, if you think that wasn't civil, I'd just suggest you couldn't be more wrong.

    Keep on topic and we'll be fine and don't claim fouls when there are none, because they're far too important not to dilute falsely when there actually *is* an ad hominem or incivility (which happens far too often on sites like this). And lastly, if you have a problem, go to the mods, don't pick up the rules and claim *you* are the law, it's really quite insulting, which I think is rather ironic considering your claim of foul above in #3.

    Now let's get back on topic and discuss these new HomeKit offerings.
    Move along, man. Last I checked, you're not the Mod here.
    edited July 2017 williamlondon
  • Reply 17 of 29
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     
    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    Are you kidding me? This is utterly ridiculous (not you, *this* whole conversation). I would consider the posts into non-HomeKit stuff to be more than a slight diversion, number one and two above are being interpreted by you to be whatever you want them to mean, that's quite obvious, and as for number 3, you are way, way, way off here. It really annoys me when people cry foul when there is none, no logical fallacy, nothing I wouldn't say to your face, if you think that wasn't civil, I'd just suggest you couldn't be more wrong.

    Keep on topic and we'll be fine and don't claim fouls when there are none, because they're far too important not to dilute falsely when there actually *is* an ad hominem or incivility (which happens far too often on sites like this). And lastly, if you have a problem, go to the mods, don't pick up the rules and claim *you* are the law, it's really quite insulting, which I think is rather ironic considering your claim of foul above in #3.

    Now let's get back on topic and discuss these new HomeKit offerings.
    Move along, man. Last I checked, you're not the Mod here.
    Oh the irony is so very thick here.
  • Reply 18 of 29
    rivertriprivertrip Posts: 112member
    72w vampire power?
  • Reply 19 of 29
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,061member
    amarkap said:
    @williamlondon ;

    From AppleInsider Guide to posting on these forums (link provided below):
     
    1) We definitely want you to: Share unique perspectives, opinions, or insights based on your experience.  -  Bocaboy and I were both within guidelines in sharing our insights and experiences using TP-Link and "stupid timers you plug into the wall" as you put it.  

    2) Veer things off-topic. A slight diversion is OK deeper into the comments, but we will use our judgment here.  -  As you can see there is no hard line when it comes to going "off-topic" if it was really that far off-topic I'm sure the Editors would have removed our postings.

    3) When all else fails, just remember - be civil! Don't say things here that you wouldn't say face-to-face. -  Based on the tone of your reply and the choice of words you used, I'd say your post was pretty much what they don't want to see in these forums

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/184333/appleinsiders-updated-commenting-guidelines/p1

    Thank you




    Are you kidding me? This is utterly ridiculous (not you, *this* whole conversation). I would consider the posts into non-HomeKit stuff to be more than a slight diversion, number one and two above are being interpreted by you to be whatever you want them to mean, that's quite obvious, and as for number 3, you are way, way, way off here. It really annoys me when people cry foul when there is none, no logical fallacy, nothing I wouldn't say to your face, if you think that wasn't civil, I'd just suggest you couldn't be more wrong.

    Keep on topic and we'll be fine and don't claim fouls when there are none, because they're far too important not to dilute falsely when there actually *is* an ad hominem or incivility (which happens far too often on sites like this). And lastly, if you have a problem, go to the mods, don't pick up the rules and claim *you* are the law, it's really quite insulting, which I think is rather ironic considering your claim of foul above in #3.

    Now let's get back on topic and discuss these new HomeKit offerings.
    Move along, man. Last I checked, you're not the Mod here.
    Oh the irony is so very thick here.
    Glad you see that. 
  • Reply 20 of 29
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,349administrator
    rivertrip said:
    72w vampire power?
    Older plasma television, older HD set-top box, two consoles.
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