Deutsche Bank drops last BlackBerrys to standardize on iOS

Posted:
in iPhone
After many years of allowing its employees to replace their corporate-assigned BlackBerry phones with iPhones under a "Bring Your Own Device" policy, Germany's Deutsche Bank is finally officially phasing out all of its BlackBerry devices for new Apple gear.




A report by Steven Arons and Gerrit De Vynck for Bloomberg noted that "Some clients had made fun of the bank for still using BlackBerrys."

The incremental phasing out of BlackBerry devices was hastened by the fact that BlackBerry itself stopped making its own hardware last September, choosing instead to license the rights to manufacture BlackBerry-branded phones to China's TCL."Some clients had made fun of the bank for still using BlackBerrys"

The number of BlackBerry OS devices sold globally plummeted from 32.5 million in 2012 to just 0.8 million last year, forcing BlackBerry (formerly known as RIM) to refocus the company on software used to manage fleets of enterprise devices, notably including iPhone and iPad.

Eight years ago, in late 2009, Deutsche Bank itself reported on the emerging enterprise trend toward iOS occurring among businesses, back when Apple shipped only around 2 million iPhones to corporate users, accounting for around 7 percent of the enterprise market.

Two years later in early 2011, Deutsche Bank itself announced an "overwhelmingly positive" experience in an internal study of a shift from BlackBerry devices with physical keyboards to iPhones.

The study noted that the "iPhone interface is vastly superior in terms of speed and accessibility and prioritizing key emails and we view the Blackberry trackball as archaic and cumbersome," adding that "there is no going back."

At the time, migrating to iPhones required leaving BlackBerry Enterprise Server (which did not yet support IOS) for a solution that combined Good Technologies software and Microsoft Exchange Server.

BlackBerry Gets Good

Motorola had initially acquired Good Technologies in 2006 in a failed effort to compete with BlackBerry and its BES messaging and device management software; however, the company was unable to make meaningful inroads into BlackBerry's enterprise device business.

Motorola later sold off Good's software shortly before Google acquired Motorola's hardware business in late 2011 in a similarly failed effort to design and build its own Android phones for both consumers and enterprise buyers.

After separating from Motorola, Good began reporting quarterly statistics showing that enterprise users increasingly favored Apple's mobile platform for their devices-- the first real threat to BlackBerry's once dominant position in mobile devices used for business.

By 2013, Good reported that iPhones accounted for 72 percent of all of its managed phones globally, while iPad represented 90 percent of its managed tablets-- largely due to the fact that more than 95 percent of enterprise apps were being deployed for iOS.

By September 2015, BlackBerry announced the acquisition of Good Technology in a move to expand support for managing iOS devices.

iOS unchallenged in the Enterprise

Apple's popularity among enterprise users-- driven by BYOD policies that enabled individuals to pick iPhones and iPads over competing devices selected by a firm's IT department-- has had a particularly brutal impact on efforts by Microsoft to leverage its existing Windows PC partnerships to sell Windows Phone, Windows Mobile, Windows Tablet PC, UMPC, Slate PC and Surface products to corporate accounts in sustainable volumes.

Apple's iOS devices are also clearly differentiated in the enterprise from generic devices running some version of Android or Linux, particularly due to their ease of setup, management and security in comparison to the hardware and software fragmentation and variations seen among Android licensees, despite inconsistent efforts by Google to attempt to target the enterprise.




That has effectively made iOS the modern "Windows" of mobile devices used in the enterprise, further cementing the stickiness of Apple's iOS platform overall among all users.The many years that it took for Apple to muscle into the corporate world--once completely dominated by Windows PCs and BlackBerry mobile devices--offers perspective into how difficult it will be for any other company to similarly displace iOS among enterprise users

At the same time, the many years that it took for Apple to muscle into the corporate world--once completely dominated by Windows PCs and BlackBerry mobile devices--offers perspective into how difficult it will be for any other company to similarly displace iOS among enterprise users. There are currently not even any credible contenders seeking to rival Apple.

Further, Apple isn't sitting still. In its most recent quarterly earnings call, the company noted that Walmart will be deploying 19,000 new iPads for training 225,000 employees across all 50 United States and that clients ranging from Bank of America to Medtronic to Panera Bread have plans to introduce the new 10.5 inch iPad Pro across their organizations.

It also highlighted partnerships to bolster network and iOS mobile device security with Cisco; noted that its recent iOS enterprise app partnership with SAP is now being deployed to 47 million users globally; and detailed the European expansion of its enterprise app partnership with Deloitte, now growing in parallel with its initial work with IBM to build custom iOS apps for businesses, an effort which started in 2014.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    Love the quote: "Some clients had made fun of the bank for still using BlackBerrys"
    watto_cobraAviesheklolliver
  • Reply 2 of 26
    We live in historic times. Who would have thought that Apple would surpass Microsoft in so many areas, and that the iPhone will obliterate BlackBerry. Apple is not immune to being complacent, that's always the tendency, but I guess they are better than most at challenging themselves all the time. Still, such a fast rise for Apple, and big fall for BlackBerry. Wow! I think BlackBerry never thought that people would accept a phone that you have to charge each evening. Just like some people did not think people would accept a smart watch you have to charge each evening. So after 10 years, we still charge our iPhones each evening. The Pluses can last two days, but we still hug the walls, as the BlackBerry CEO said. But it was their doom. For a better experience, people made that sacrifice.
    RacerhomieXwatto_cobraronnlkruppLukeCagemagman1979steveau
  • Reply 3 of 26
    RIP Crackberries 
    watto_cobraAviesheklolliver
  • Reply 4 of 26
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,964member
    I got my new iPad Pro 12.9" to replace my old iPad 3. I love it.  I was thinking maybe it would be a bit too large and maybe should have gotten the 10.5" version.  But in the week, today, that I've owned it, I'm glad I went this size.  I have my Windows desktops, but I'm glad I can leave ask the widows issue behind using the iPad. 

    Lots of great apps for home use and work use.
    RacerhomieXwatto_cobraRayz2016Avieshekmagman1979lolliver
  • Reply 5 of 26

    ...
    That has effectively made iOS the modern "Windows" of mobile devices used in the enterprise, further cementing the stickiness of Apple's iOS platform overall among all users.The many years that it took for Apple to muscle into the corporate world--once completely dominated by Windows PCs and BlackBerry mobile devices--offers perspective into how difficult it will be for any other company to similarly displace iOS among enterprise users
    ...
    Further, Apple isn't sitting still. In its most recent quarterly earnings call, the company noted that Walmart will be deploying 19,000 new iPads for training 225,000 employees across all 50 United States and that clients ranging from Bank of America to Medtronic to Panera Bread have plans to introduce the new 10.5 inch iPad Pro across their organizations.

    It also highlighted partnerships to bolster network and iOS mobile device security with Cisco; noted that its recent iOS enterprise app partnership with SAP is now being deployed to 47 million users globally; and detailed the European expansion of its enterprise app partnership with Deloitte, now growing in parallel with its initial work with IBM to build custom iOS apps for businesses, an effort which started in 2014.
    Also, the Accenture collaboration: http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/08/29/apple-gets-further-toehold-in-big-business-with-ios-focused-accenture-enterprise-partnership

    What's really interesting here is that it looks like iPhones and iPads, not "PCs" (Windows or Macs, for that matter) are becoming the tool of choice for enterprise users.
    RacerhomieXwatto_cobramagman1979lolliver
  • Reply 6 of 26
    I believe there's a whole other reason for corporate America supporting BYOD programs.  They save money.  We pay for our iPhones and iPads along with the data programs.  Huge savings for the companies we work for.
  • Reply 7 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,608member
    Both Microsoft and Blackberry laughed when Jobs pulled the iPhone out of pocket in 2007. The tech media laughed. The pundits laughed.The financial analysts laughed. John C Dvorak laughed (remember him?) The only ones who didn't laugh were the Android engineers... "As a consumer I was blown away. I wanted one immediately. But as a Google engineer, I thought ‘We’re going to have to start over."

    Well, no one is laughing now are they. Oh wait, those own AAPL are laughing all the way to the bank.
    edited September 2017 macxpressAvieshekStrangeDaysLukeCagemagman1979chianetmagelolliver
  • Reply 8 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,608member

    ...
    That has effectively made iOS the modern "Windows" of mobile devices used in the enterprise, further cementing the stickiness of Apple's iOS platform overall among all users.The many years that it took for Apple to muscle into the corporate world--once completely dominated by Windows PCs and BlackBerry mobile devices--offers perspective into how difficult it will be for any other company to similarly displace iOS among enterprise users
    ...
    Further, Apple isn't sitting still. In its most recent quarterly earnings call, the company noted that Walmart will be deploying 19,000 new iPads for training 225,000 employees across all 50 United States and that clients ranging from Bank of America to Medtronic to Panera Bread have plans to introduce the new 10.5 inch iPad Pro across their organizations.

    It also highlighted partnerships to bolster network and iOS mobile device security with Cisco; noted that its recent iOS enterprise app partnership with SAP is now being deployed to 47 million users globally; and detailed the European expansion of its enterprise app partnership with Deloitte, now growing in parallel with its initial work with IBM to build custom iOS apps for businesses, an effort which started in 2014.
    Also, the Accenture collaboration: http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/08/29/apple-gets-further-toehold-in-big-business-with-ios-focused-accenture-enterprise-partnership

    What's really interesting here is that it looks like iPhones and iPads, not "PCs" (Windows or Macs, for that matter) are becoming the tool of choice for enterprise users.
    Oh watch yourself there, buddy. The desktop fan club would beg to differ with you, vehemently.
    magman1979chia
  • Reply 9 of 26
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,085member
    “Never say never”, I know. But I don’t see how it’s even remotely possible for any company to display Apple anytime soon in either the consumer or enterprise space. Especially enterprise, which is an extremely tough nut to tack an which Apple has been working on since the 1st iPhone. Who could possible come spring that can compete with Apples entire package, including design, hardware, software, corporate culture, never-ending investments, ecosystem, financial war chest, brand equity, etc? I don’t see it. Apple is in a better position now than Microsoft was a couple decades ago, simply because people love the company and its products. 
    StrangeDaysmagman1979lolliver
  • Reply 10 of 26
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,323member
    lkrupp said:

    ...
    That has effectively made iOS the modern "Windows" of mobile devices used in the enterprise, further cementing the stickiness of Apple's iOS platform overall among all users.The many years that it took for Apple to muscle into the corporate world--once completely dominated by Windows PCs and BlackBerry mobile devices--offers perspective into how difficult it will be for any other company to similarly displace iOS among enterprise users
    ...
    Further, Apple isn't sitting still. In its most recent quarterly earnings call, the company noted that Walmart will be deploying 19,000 new iPads for training 225,000 employees across all 50 United States and that clients ranging from Bank of America to Medtronic to Panera Bread have plans to introduce the new 10.5 inch iPad Pro across their organizations.

    It also highlighted partnerships to bolster network and iOS mobile device security with Cisco; noted that its recent iOS enterprise app partnership with SAP is now being deployed to 47 million users globally; and detailed the European expansion of its enterprise app partnership with Deloitte, now growing in parallel with its initial work with IBM to build custom iOS apps for businesses, an effort which started in 2014.
    Also, the Accenture collaboration: http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/08/29/apple-gets-further-toehold-in-big-business-with-ios-focused-accenture-enterprise-partnership

    What's really interesting here is that it looks like iPhones and iPads, not "PCs" (Windows or Macs, for that matter) are becoming the tool of choice for enterprise users.
    Oh watch yourself there, buddy. The desktop fan club would beg to differ with you, vehemently.
    What I read the other day was that the Mac is about at a 5% level in business, or at least medium to large business, as in enterprise, which includes government. It is growing though.

    on the other hand, the iPhone is about 75%, and the iPad around 80%. But penetration of mobile hasn’t reached the penetration of traditional computers, which means that there’s a long way to go. On that road, there’s still a chance that Android can catch up. It will be hard. But if 90% of people have computers, which would make change difficult, and 50% have phones, then change is easier there still. And for tablets, penetration is still far less, about 10-15%, meaning that change is even easier there.

    but, and it’s a large but (not butt, to forestall comments), except for Samsung’s Knox, and feeble attempts by Blackberry, Android isn’t as easily secured, either out of the box, or afterwards. The problem is perhaps mainly the well known fragmentation issue. With the largest part of the Android base on a two year old version at about 40% share, and with a three year old version at over 30%, and with the version released a little over a year ago only at about 13%, it’s hard to properly secure older phones. This is an issue that’s going to dog Google for years to come, unless they can do something about their decision at the beginning to allow manufacturers to have”skins” that make it difficult to run a new OS version right away, and cell carriers who delay due to “network compatibility” issues.

    these issues have been holding Android back from most deployments. Samsung, with Knox, has had some success, but no one else has. As a result, most of the business and government level software has been aimed at iOS, which make moving from that difficult, the way moving from Windows is difficult.

    its worse with tablets, because other than Samsung’s efforts, there aren’t any really decent Android tablets available, and Apple just did serious damage to Samsung’s efforts with the $329 model, which goes against Samsung’s $600 model, which does come with a $50 Wacom enabled pen. But Apple’s tablet is a lot more powerful, and how many users really need than pen for business use? Samsung is goi g to have to do something about that, and the question is whether they can meet Apple’s new pricing, while coming anywhere near the performance, or build quality, or innate security.
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 11 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,704member
    slurpy said:
    “Never say never”, I know. But I don’t see how it’s even remotely possible for any company to display Apple anytime soon in either the consumer or enterprise space. Especially enterprise, which is an extremely tough nut to tack an which Apple has been working on since the 1st iPhone. Who could possible come spring that can compete with Apples entire package, including design, hardware, software, corporate culture, never-ending investments, ecosystem, financial war chest, brand equity, etc? I don’t see it. Apple is in a better position now than Microsoft was a couple decades ago, simply because people love the company and its products. 
    True...but it only takes one dipshit CEO to come into Apple and screw everything up. Just look at Steve Ballmer at Microsoft...

    This is exactly one of the main reasons why I don't want Tim Cook to leave, or be replaced. Some think its a horrible CEO, but I'd be really concerned (scared?) about who Apple would replace him with and the direction they would take Apple. Even Apple can start to falter. I'd glad we have a CEO that deeply cares about Apple and the empire its built. 
    badmonk
  • Reply 12 of 26
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,323member
    macxpress said:
    slurpy said:
    “Never say never”, I know. But I don’t see how it’s even remotely possible for any company to display Apple anytime soon in either the consumer or enterprise space. Especially enterprise, which is an extremely tough nut to tack an which Apple has been working on since the 1st iPhone. Who could possible come spring that can compete with Apples entire package, including design, hardware, software, corporate culture, never-ending investments, ecosystem, financial war chest, brand equity, etc? I don’t see it. Apple is in a better position now than Microsoft was a couple decades ago, simply because people love the company and its products. 
    True...but it only takes one dipshit CEO to come into Apple and screw everything up. Just look at Steve Ballmer at Microsoft...

    This is exactly one of the main reasons why I don't want Tim Cook to leave, or be replaced. Some think its a horrible CEO, but I'd be really concerned (scared?) about who Apple would replace him with and the direction they would take Apple. Even Apple can start to falter. I'd glad we have a CEO that deeply cares about Apple and the empire its built. 
    Forget about Microsoft. It took one dipshit ceo at Apple to almost sink the ship. That ceo was Michael Spindler. He came on right after John Sculley left. He was responsible for the failure of the Newton and Copeland. But his greatest failure was, during the holiday season of 1995, releasing a new line of “inexpensive” Macs using the Motorola 68040 chips, which Apple had been moving away from in favor of the PPC. That line was a complete failure from the very introduction. He then compounded his error in literally burying them in land dumps and in the ocean, rather than giving them away to the schools and libraries which were begging Apple for them. He was fired shortly afterwards.

    but this action led to the abandonment of Macs in corporate use, as CIOs, who weren’t thrilled with Macs to begin with, advised their bosses that Apple was finished, and so they should leave them for Windows.
    magman1979macxpress
  • Reply 13 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,608member
    macxpress said:
    slurpy said:
    “Never say never”, I know. But I don’t see how it’s even remotely possible for any company to display Apple anytime soon in either the consumer or enterprise space. Especially enterprise, which is an extremely tough nut to tack an which Apple has been working on since the 1st iPhone. Who could possible come spring that can compete with Apples entire package, including design, hardware, software, corporate culture, never-ending investments, ecosystem, financial war chest, brand equity, etc? I don’t see it. Apple is in a better position now than Microsoft was a couple decades ago, simply because people love the company and its products. 
    True...but it only takes one dipshit CEO to come into Apple and screw everything up. Just look at Steve Ballmer at Microsoft...

    This is exactly one of the main reasons why I don't want Tim Cook to leave, or be replaced. Some think its a horrible CEO, but I'd be really concerned (scared?) about who Apple would replace him with and the direction they would take Apple. Even Apple can start to falter. I'd glad we have a CEO that deeply cares about Apple and the empire its built. 
    Apple 's been there, done that. They've already had a dipshit CEO. They called him "The Diesel" and he liked to hide under his desk when things got tough.
    magman1979
  • Reply 14 of 26
    That has effectively made iOS the modern "Windows" of mobile devices

    Truth be told. 
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 15 of 26
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,408member
    "Deutsche Bank Drops Last Blackberries..."

    Low-hanging fruit...
  • Reply 16 of 26
    melgross said:

    on the other hand, the iPhone is about 75%, and the iPad around 80%. But penetration of mobile hasn’t reached the penetration of traditional computers, which means that there’s a long way to go. On that road, there’s still a chance that Android can catch up. It will be hard. But if 90% of people have computers, which would make change difficult, and 50% have phones, then change is easier there still. And for tablets, penetration is still far less, about 10-15%, meaning that change is even easier there.

    but, and it’s a large but (not butt, to forestall comments), except for Samsung’s Knox, and feeble attempts by Blackberry, Android isn’t as easily secured, either out of the box, or afterwards. The problem is perhaps mainly the well known fragmentation issue. With the largest part of the Android base on a two year old version at about 40% share, and with a three year old version at over 30%, and with the version released a little over a year ago only at about 13%, it’s hard to properly secure older phones. This is an issue that’s going to dog Google for years to come, unless they can do something about their decision at the beginning to allow manufacturers to have”skins” that make it difficult to run a new OS version right away, and cell carriers who delay due to “network compatibility” issues.

    these issues have been holding Android back from most deployments. Samsung, with Knox, has had some success, but no one else has. As a result, most of the business and government level software has been aimed at iOS, which make moving from that difficult, the way moving from Windows is difficult.

    its worse with tablets, because other than

    Samsung’s efforts, there aren’t any really decent Android tablets available, and Apple just did serious damage to Samsung’s efforts with the $329 model, which goes against Samsung’s $600 model, which does come with a $50 Wacom enabled pen. But Apple’s tablet is a lot more powerful, and how many users really need than pen for business use? Samsung is goi g to have to do something about that, and the question is whether they can meet Apple’s new pricing, while coming anywhere near the performance, or build quality, or innate security.

    Please don't mention Samsung KNOX, as it was already proven to be a massive joke in the security world and just another bullet point on Samsung's never ending meaningless spec sheet:

    http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/20766/hacking/samsung-knox-serious-flaw.html

    Let's also not forget that biometrics data on many Android devices, including Samsung's, are wide open to siphoning by malicious apps due to piss-poor storage and encryption methodologies.

    Any business where I see Android devices of any kind in use, especially in the collection of personal data such as POS systems, I don't go to, and won't give them my business, knowing what a POS Android is, and continues to be, in almost all aspects of the OS / platform.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 26
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,323member
    melgross said:

    on the other hand, the iPhone is about 75%, and the iPad around 80%. But penetration of mobile hasn’t reached the penetration of traditional computers, which means that there’s a long way to go. On that road, there’s still a chance that Android can catch up. It will be hard. But if 90% of people have computers, which would make change difficult, and 50% have phones, then change is easier there still. And for tablets, penetration is still far less, about 10-15%, meaning that change is even easier there.

    but, and it’s a large but (not butt, to forestall comments), except for Samsung’s Knox, and feeble attempts by Blackberry, Android isn’t as easily secured, either out of the box, or afterwards. The problem is perhaps mainly the well known fragmentation issue. With the largest part of the Android base on a two year old version at about 40% share, and with a three year old version at over 30%, and with the version released a little over a year ago only at about 13%, it’s hard to properly secure older phones. This is an issue that’s going to dog Google for years to come, unless they can do something about their decision at the beginning to allow manufacturers to have”skins” that make it difficult to run a new OS version right away, and cell carriers who delay due to “network compatibility” issues.

    these issues have been holding Android back from most deployments. Samsung, with Knox, has had some success, but no one else has. As a result, most of the business and government level software has been aimed at iOS, which make moving from that difficult, the way moving from Windows is difficult.

    its worse with tablets, because other than

    Samsung’s efforts, there aren’t any really decent Android tablets available, and Apple just did serious damage to Samsung’s efforts with the $329 model, which goes against Samsung’s $600 model, which does come with a $50 Wacom enabled pen. But Apple’s tablet is a lot more powerful, and how many users really need than pen for business use? Samsung is goi g to have to do something about that, and the question is whether they can meet Apple’s new pricing, while coming anywhere near the performance, or build quality, or innate security.

    Please don't mention Samsung KNOX, as it was already proven to be a massive joke in the security world and just another bullet point on Samsung's never ending meaningless spec sheet:

    http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/20766/hacking/samsung-knox-serious-flaw.html

    Let's also not forget that biometrics data on many Android devices, including Samsung's, are wide open to siphoning by malicious apps due to piss-poor storage and encryption methodologies.

    Any business where I see Android devices of any kind in use, especially in the collection of personal data such as POS systems, I don't go to, and won't give them my business, knowing what a POS Android is, and continues to be, in almost all aspects of the OS / platform.
    Well, it was a major problem for some time. But the pentagon does certify them for some people. It’s not all bad cherries.
  • Reply 18 of 26
    Deutsche Bank, the losers involved in laundering Russian oligarch money. Nice.
  • Reply 19 of 26
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,323member
    Deutsche Bank, the losers involved in laundering Russian oligarch money. Nice.
    And the only bank that will deal with Donald Trump.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    Great article DED and welcome back.  Hey where are the trolls?
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