Apple TV 4K impressions positive, depending on how bought-in users are to iTunes

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited September 2017
Early reviews of the Apple TV 4K are in, with most reviewers having a generally positive impression of the device -- but all point out that other than future-proofing there is no reason to invest in the device if you have no interest in the Apple iTunes ecosystem, or don't have a 4K television.




Engadget briefly examined the device, and published its examination of first impressions. Devindra Hardawar called it the "streaming box I've been waiting for" and trumpeted the device's easy setup with an iPhone. Hardawar also noted that the set automatically enabled Dolby Vision, as well as keeping HDR enabled all the time to prevent the television from switching between modes.

Films downloaded from Apple were "stunning" with videos playing within a second from selecting the title.

Nilay Patel from The Verge criticized the device for forces mostly out of Apple's control -- the lack of Disney-produced movies and YouTube in 4K HDR. Additionally, Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.

"The Apple TV 4K HDR processing blew out all the contrast in the image, sharpened everything to hell, and turned the film grain into noise," Wrote Patel. "The same movie looked fine on iTunes, but it just looked bad from HBO Go."

Patel later checked the same video on the fourth-generation Apple TV, and called it "fine" with "work to be done" on content from other apps -- but who is responsible for that work wasn't made clear.

Overall, Patel's review was positive, with several of his concerns about the device addressed by Apple during the course of the examination. He appears to have hope for the future with software upgrades to the Apple TV 4K over time.

David Katzmaier from cnet also generally praised the device with caveats, nothing that it had the "most polished streaming experience today" with the "best remote on the market."

Katzmaier also noted that while Apple's pricing for 4K content significiantly undercuts the other streaming players, that 4K and HDR content is scarce, and the device costs more than twice as much as a similar Roku device.

"Unless you're an Apple die-hard with extra cash, it's worth waiting a bit," write Katzmaier. "Stay tuned."

USA Today also briefly assessed the device from a user perspective, and less as a deep-dive into the technology. Mike Snider watched "Wonder Woman" on a compatible Samsung 4K television, and called it "as wonderful as in the theater."

"Apple is notable for the panache its products deliver," wrote Snider. "Apple devotees who have already embraced 4K -- or plan to do so soon -- will certainly want to give the new Apple TV a look."

Key takeaways

All of the reviewers noted that surround sound options peak at Dolby 7.1 -- with no inclusion of Atmos. Also, there is no television content from Apple available in 4K.

In short, it appears that the Apple TV 4K is squarely aimed at those who benefitted from prior purchases, and the free update to 4K HDR versions, where available.

AppleInsider evaluation is forthcoming

AppleInsider staffers have a variety of setups integrating the Apple TV. In a series of examinations of the device, we will be looking at not only streaming to the device from the Internet, but also the device performs across a local area network in conjunction with how the iTunes and Apple TV 4K combination deals with user-supplied 4K content.

Additionally, we will examine the device in an assortment of environments ranging from a small office to a home theater set up in a living room.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    Won't the YouTube 4K HDR issue get fixed by YouTube updating their app?  It's hard to imagine that they wouldn't do that.
    adm1Scot1
  • Reply 2 of 35
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,091member
    alandail said:
    Won't the YouTube 4K HDR issue get fixed by YouTube updating their app?  It's hard to imagine that they wouldn't do that.
    Well it was hard to believe when Amazon stopped selling the ATV and refused to produce an ATV Prime app, then came up with some lame reasoning for doing so. Who knows what Google will do. These actors are all competing with each other for the streaming market. On the other hand the naysayers are trashing the ATV5 for not including the 4K format that Google uses which is some open source product. Apple still doesn’t support Og Vorbis, the open source format Wikipedia uses. Apple has committed itself to h.264 and h.265 as the best choice for video streaming.
    hmurchison
  • Reply 3 of 35

    "Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.”


    I wonder if it will upscale ripped DVDs served from old iMac? I guess the question is partially answered in the next graph: perhaps, but poorly.

  • Reply 4 of 35
    sog35 said:
    ...
    THE BAD
    ...
    2. Remote is still to symmetrical. Hard to tell orientation without looking

    THIS! I always pick up the remote backwards.
    king editor the grate
  • Reply 5 of 35
    sog35 said:
    Having my HD videos turn into 4k videos for FREE is the killer feature.

    That alone will pay for the ATV 4k
    My Library is 170 movies of which many already show 4K options.  Apple’s aggressive pricing and upgrades means I’m buying at a minimum 3 ATV 4K. 


    Solicali
  • Reply 6 of 35
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,880member
    lkrupp said:
    alandail said:
    Won't the YouTube 4K HDR issue get fixed by YouTube updating their app?  It's hard to imagine that they wouldn't do that.
    Well it was hard to believe when Amazon stopped selling the ATV and refused to produce an ATV Prime app, then came up with some lame reasoning for doing so. Who knows what Google will do. These actors are all competing with each other for the streaming market. On the other hand the naysayers are trashing the ATV5 for not including the 4K format that Google uses which is some open source product. Apple still doesn’t support Og Vorbis, the open source format Wikipedia uses. Apple has committed itself to h.264 and h.265 as the best choice for video streaming.
    Apple has announced that the Amazon Prime Video AppleTV app has been delayed but will be coming to Apple TV sometime soon. As for Apple supporting a specialized Google format, there's nothing Apple can do but support the best standards-based video format and let users decide whether they want to continue using Amazon Prime. From what I've heard, the movie list in Amazon Prime is worse than Netflix but people have their own opinion about everything.
    Solicali
  • Reply 7 of 35
    I'm probably the odd one here, but I have no interest in 4K, HDR, and I don't mind the controller. Try putting a raised sticker on the bottom half of remote, it gives it some colour, it looks better and you can feel which way the controller is. 
    williamlondonpscooter63
  • Reply 8 of 35
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,880member

    "Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.”


    I wonder if it will upscale ripped DVDs served from old iMac? I guess the question is partially answered in the next graph: perhaps, but poorly.

    Apple can't control HBO's pathetic excuse for any kind of streaming. As for upscaling your ripped DVDs (as well as mine), you have to remember what happens when upscaling any image or video. If something isn't there, it won't be there when it's upscaled. Forget all those movies showing a heavily pixelized image magically becoming clear when they apply some secret government algorithm. Even NCIS quit showing that, saying there wasn't enough data to get anything better. 

    Even if you were to re-rip all those old DVDs into 4K (or even true 1080p), I don't believe there's enough original data to do a good job of it. I just noticed Handbrake has a new version 1.0.7 that includes a setting of Apple 1080p60 Surround gives you a H.264 video (up to 1080p60), AAC stereo audio and Dolby Digital (AC-3) surround audio that works with Apple TV4. We'll see if they upgrade to handling H.265/HEVC. Of course Handbrake doesn't decrypt encrypted movies but it still might be worth a test, which I'll do on some DVD's I own.

    It might require Blu-ray content to actually get high enough definition to look nice on a 4K screen so all of our DVDs might be worthless anyway.
    king editor the gratepscooter63
  • Reply 9 of 35
    FWIW, I got a smart Roku 4k TV at a good price to replace a failing 1080p HDTV. I didn't really want or need 4k or "smart" but decided the extra $50 was worth it. 

    My ATV4 works just fine on it through the HDMI port. But interestingly, since installing it a few weeks ago, I've yet to turn it on. The "smart" interface works great, the remote is much better that the ATV4. One thing I noticed right away: the FoxSportsGo app on ATV always asks me for login credentials each day. The Roku asked once, and remembers it. Funny how something so trivial is so appreciated.

    I was going to upgrade to the 4k HDTV, but have no need to now. I don't consume a lot of movies, and have some in iTunes. I appreciate the free upgrade to 4k on those I bought, but for now, it isn't worth the device price. 

    If/when ATV gets an OTA tuner with a antenna coax jack (like silicon dust/HDHomeRun), I'll be all in. But...as granpaw used to say: "no money in that." Pretty sure Apple has no business model for OTA content.
  • Reply 10 of 35
    adm1adm1 Posts: 839member
    mike54 said:
    I'm probably the odd one here, but I have no interest in 4K, HDR, and I don't mind the controller. Try putting a raised sticker on the bottom half of remote, it gives it some colour, it looks better and you can feel which way the controller is. 
    Having several 4K capable TVs for a year or so now and viewed plenty 4K content via Amazon and Sky Q - it really does blow you away. Can't say either way on HDR yet as all my TVs are 8-bit, not full 10bit capable. It's overkill (4K) for your average TV soap viewing but in an Attenborough documentary for example, it's beautiful.
    hmurchison
  • Reply 11 of 35
    mike54 said:
    I'm probably the odd one here, but I have no interest in 4K, HDR, and I don't mind the controller. Try putting a raised sticker on the bottom half of remote, it gives it some colour, it looks better and you can feel which way the controller is. 
    Having to put stickers on the remote (or rubber bands as i do) means you do in fact also have a problem with its poor symmetrical design. 
    Soliwilliamlondonpscooter63
  • Reply 12 of 35
     I would prefer that my Dolby at most Denon receiver upscale 4K content or that my LG oled television upscale the content rather than Apple device. 
  • Reply 13 of 35

    "Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.”


    I wonder if it will upscale ripped DVDs served from old iMac? I guess the question is partially answered in the next graph: perhaps, but poorly.

    I don't know how great the AppleTV's upscaler will be nor do I know if it is better than the one in my 4K TV's (all have them, but depending on what you paid for your TV there will be distinct differences in the quality). It would be nice to be able to turn off the upscaling at the AppleTV and let the TV give it go before deciding which way to go. I doubt the AppleTV's upscaler will fair favorably against the ones in the top of the line TV's
  • Reply 14 of 35
    adm1 said:
    mike54 said:
    I'm probably the odd one here, but I have no interest in 4K, HDR, and I don't mind the controller. Try putting a raised sticker on the bottom half of remote, it gives it some colour, it looks better and you can feel which way the controller is. 
    Having several 4K capable TVs for a year or so now and viewed plenty 4K content via Amazon and Sky Q - it really does blow you away. Can't say either way on HDR yet as all my TVs are 8-bit, not full 10bit capable. It's overkill (4K) for your average TV soap viewing but in an Attenborough documentary for example, it's beautiful.
    It is. As with any tech though, deciding on its value is a very personal decision. 

    I have no doubt there are many, many people that truthfully say: "I have an am radio, so I have no need for Apple Music, HomePods, AirPods, iPods, or any of that overpriced hooey." They save thousands of dollars.
    cali
  • Reply 15 of 35
    Early reviews of the Apple TV 4K are in, with most reviewers having a generally positive impression of the device -- but all point out that other than future-proofing there is no reason to invest in the device if you have no interest in the Apple iTunes ecosystem, or don't have a 4K television.




    Engadget briefly examined the device, and published its examination of first impressions. Devindra Hardawar called it the "streaming box I've been waiting for" and trumpeted the device's easy setup with an iPhone. Hardawar also noted that the set automatically enabled Dolby Vision, as well as keeping HDR enabled all the time to prevent the television from switching between modes.

    Films downloaded from Apple were "stunning" with videos playing within a second from selecting the title.

    Nilay Patel from The Verge criticized the device for forces mostly out of Apple's control -- the lack of Disney-produced movies and YouTube in 4K HDR. Additionally, Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.

    "The Apple TV 4K HDR processing blew out all the contrast in the image, sharpened everything to hell, and turned the film grain into noise," Wrote Patel. "The same movie looked fine on iTunes, but it just looked bad from HBO Go."

    Patel later checked the same video on the fourth-generation Apple TV, and called it "fine" with "work to be done" on content from other apps -- but who is responsible for that work wasn't made clear.

    Overall, Patel's review was positive, with several of his concerns about the device addressed by Apple during the course of the examination. He appears to have hope for the future with software upgrades to the Apple TV 4K over time.

    David Katzmaier from cnet also generally praised the device with caveats, nothing that it had the "most polished streaming experience today" with the "best remote on the market."

    Katzmaier also noted that while Apple's pricing for 4K content significiantly undercuts the other streaming players, that 4K and HDR content is scarce, and the device costs more than twice as much as a similar Roku device.

    "Unless you're an Apple die-hard with extra cash, it's worth waiting a bit," write Katzmaier. "Stay tuned."

    USA Today also briefly assessed the device from a user perspective, and less as a deep-dive into the technology. Mike Snider watched "Wonder Woman" on a compatible Samsung 4K television, and called it "as wonderful as in the theater."

    "Apple is notable for the panache its products deliver," wrote Snider. "Apple devotees who have already embraced 4K -- or plan to do so soon -- will certainly want to give the new Apple TV a look."

    Key takeaways

    All of the reviewers noted that surround sound options peak at Dolby 7.1 -- with no inclusion of Atmos. Also, there remains to be no television content from Apple available in 4K.

    In short, it appears that the Apple TV 4K is squarely aimed at those who benefitted from prior purchases, and the free update to 4K HDR versions, where available.

    AppleInsider evaluation is forthcoming

    AppleInsider staffers have a variety of setups integrating the Apple TV. In a series of examinations of the device, we will be looking at not only streaming to the device from the Internet, but also the device performs across a local area network in conjunction with how the iTunes and Apple TV 4K combination deals with user-supplied 4K content.

    Additionally, we will examine the device in an assortment of environments ranging from a small office to a home theater set up in a living room.
    4K is 5 years away. If it happens... it’s the least explained gimmick ever.

    4k is a differentiating function the nearly profitless television set makers have forced on us early to explain away the strange pricing of a flat panel monitor in 2017.

     I could go even deeper on this but I feel like I’m gonna lose people if I explain it but the bottom line is that 4K TVs will not happen until 4K monitors (computer monitors) are known and used as equals and the coalesce around a common codec. FYI there’s no money in content creation created for YouTube so this open source nonsense is as usual underunformed. Patel sucks.  

    for example a 65 inch uhd tv is about 1k at Best Buy today and provided the content played on it is native 4K that’s a great deal. But the 300$ 1080p one next to it is the real steal because it’s 300$ and plays all ur stuff.

    comparatively if I booted my pc to play gtav in 4K I would be told to buy a 4k monitor that per pixel would cost thousands for an equally sized unit (they don’t exist) but we’re I to ignore that and  hook my 4K gaming rig to that same tv - the 1000$ Tv would display the game in full 4K (after messing in settings a bit)

    the industry literally doesn’t know what to sell and that’s doing nothing for pushing the content creators to pick a flipping codec for sound or video. We still are being told that there different things when the singles both digital and using the same hdmi cord. 

     Until a 4K OTA signal is pumped through for free (which would require gov’t mandate just like the HD conversion did) there’s very little reason to heavily invest in the format when you have a lifetime sized collection of awesome hd stuff.

    Can’t help but notice that a whole lot of “coming soon” tech was added after the products were released... Way more than usual. 

    Also I only consume I have no idea how complex it is to promise, invent, market and release a perfect product... 

    im concerned that they lean to heavy on my trust and yours when they fall short - even for the best reasons. 

    What I’d appreciate more is a whole lot less of reading about the Verges or Patel’s opinions on Apple insider’s website as opposed to me going there and reading it for myself which I wouldn’t do

     there could not be a more biased blog

     Having said all that the problem with 4K is that there is not enough original 4K content made by the content creators not the Streamers not the publishers - anyone but the firms and studios themselves that put it out there unless it is in 4K to begin with it’s essentially upscaled

     Upscaled always means less. The benefit is they’re providing you the best version of what they could give you but it’s never going to be the full version if it wasnt it filmed in 4K

    It gets even more complicated if you start factoring in where in the stream of their upscaling it is happening,  on the streamer ? is it happening on the television?  is it happening at the studio ?

    all of those things matter

    so basically unless it’s in 4K to begin with it’s upscaled on some level and therefore not what they’re selling nor should we be expecting that it will come that way

    they can’t magically turn content 1080p into 4K

     Cd players cannot play tapes
    tape players could not play VHS tapes and eight tracks should have never happened

    they’re doing us a favor it’s not something to review or not review it’s a favor they simply cannot make 4K out of not 4K content. 

    use your brains friends. HBO has no money to make by offering its free for subscribers streaming service HBOGo (which it no longer makes people pay for because they have HBO now) in 4K - that makes no sense

    it it makes me crazy that he’s using HBO as an example of a “con” when it’s clearly an iTunes device is just ridiculous and that it’s quoted here is even more ridiculous

    Also the whole sticker idea that someone said...  about putting a sticker on the bottom 👊

    im not gonna put a sticker on the bottom of my $200 remote when I can just flip it over 

    Hannah dropping the ball with the apps on the television because frankly it should be just a giant iPhone and you letting that you can use for stuff that’s more graphically intensive say I’m looking at your stupid  6 inch phone

    They should build it out and make it the iOS Mac Mini that’s what it is anyway

     theyd probably sell more

    filled with ideas today lol
    williamlondoncalimacplusplus
  • Reply 16 of 35
    <snip>

    Yeah, blocked. Bye.

  • Reply 17 of 35
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,408member
    rob53 said:

    "Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.”


    I wonder if it will upscale ripped DVDs served from old iMac? I guess the question is partially answered in the next graph: perhaps, but poorly.

    Apple can't control HBO's pathetic excuse for any kind of streaming. As for upscaling your ripped DVDs (as well as mine), you have to remember what happens when upscaling any image or video. If something isn't there, it won't be there when it's upscaled. Forget all those movies showing a heavily pixelized image magically becoming clear when they apply some secret government algorithm. Even NCIS quit showing that, saying there wasn't enough data to get anything better. 

    Even if you were to re-rip all those old DVDs into 4K (or even true 1080p), I don't believe there's enough original data to do a good job of it. I just noticed Handbrake has a new version 1.0.7 that includes a setting of Apple 1080p60 Surround gives you a H.264 video (up to 1080p60), AAC stereo audio and Dolby Digital (AC-3) surround audio that works with Apple TV4. We'll see if they upgrade to handling H.265/HEVC. Of course Handbrake doesn't decrypt encrypted movies but it still might be worth a test, which I'll do on some DVD's I own.

    It might require Blu-ray content to actually get high enough definition to look nice on a 4K screen so all of our DVDs might be worthless anyway.
    On the Patel comment regarding the 4K upscaling of the HBO Go title, the methodology he used is clearly flawed.  It is not enough to use ATV5 for upscaling - see an issue, then compare with iTunes of the same content, and indicate a problem with ATV5.  He would also have had to test that same HBO Go content with another 4K upscaling device - perhaps a 4K TV itself (with a streamer that provides pass-through to the TV at the HBO Go native resolution).  Only then is it a true test (and still only sample content of 1) - perhaps the issue is with poorly encoded content, which will tend to look bad when upscaled.

    Ripped DVDs upscaled to 4K?  I don't see how that is going to look good.  DVDs are 480p content.  It would take some massive amount of artificial intelligence to interpolate how to fill in the blanks.

    For certain, if you don't have a 4K TV, there isn't much point other than future proofing to get it - unless Apple updates their iTunes content for 1080p with H.265 encoding (and other content providers) which would use less b/w for HD streaming.
    king editor the gratepatchythepirate
  • Reply 18 of 35
    The only people who use the phrase "future-proofing" is TV salesmen when they are trying to flog something to someone they think is a bit dim. Really grinds my gears that phrase.

    The best thing about the Apple TV is the deal Apple have got around 4K pricing. All the other retailers will demand the same deal so this will eventually benefit everyone, which is great.

    In general the Apple Watch 3, Apple TV, and iPhone 8 are all very minor incremental updates. Pretty boring tbh and tough to sell to people who own the previous gen version.

    The big Apple products this year are the X and the Speaker. Save your cash for those.


    edited September 2017 cali
  • Reply 19 of 35
    sog35 said:
    Early reviews of the Apple TV 4K are in, with most reviewers having a generally positive impression of the device -- but all point out that other than future-proofing there is no reason to invest in the device if you have no interest in the Apple iTunes ecosystem, or don't have a 4K television.




    Engadget briefly examined the device, and published its examination of first impressions. Devindra Hardawar called it the "streaming box I've been waiting for" and trumpeted the device's easy setup with an iPhone. Hardawar also noted that the set automatically enabled Dolby Vision, as well as keeping HDR enabled all the time to prevent the television from switching between modes.

    Films downloaded from Apple were "stunning" with videos playing within a second from selecting the title.

    Nilay Patel from The Verge criticized the device for forces mostly out of Apple's control -- the lack of Disney-produced movies and YouTube in 4K HDR. Additionally, Patel noted that any sub-4K content you own is upscaled on the device with what the Apple TV picks for settings as a default, and processed into 4K HDR regardless of source, at 60Hz. The upscaling apparently works fine for Apple-provided content, but fell down with a HBO Go viewing of "The Dark Knight" in HD.

    "The Apple TV 4K HDR processing blew out all the contrast in the image, sharpened everything to hell, and turned the film grain into noise," Wrote Patel. "The same movie looked fine on iTunes, but it just looked bad from HBO Go."

    Patel later checked the same video on the fourth-generation Apple TV, and called it "fine" with "work to be done" on content from other apps -- but who is responsible for that work wasn't made clear.

    Overall, Patel's review was positive, with several of his concerns about the device addressed by Apple during the course of the examination. He appears to have hope for the future with software upgrades to the Apple TV 4K over time.

    David Katzmaier from cnet also generally praised the device with caveats, nothing that it had the "most polished streaming experience today" with the "best remote on the market."

    Katzmaier also noted that while Apple's pricing for 4K content significiantly undercuts the other streaming players, that 4K and HDR content is scarce, and the device costs more than twice as much as a similar Roku device.

    "Unless you're an Apple die-hard with extra cash, it's worth waiting a bit," write Katzmaier. "Stay tuned."

    USA Today also briefly assessed the device from a user perspective, and less as a deep-dive into the technology. Mike Snider watched "Wonder Woman" on a compatible Samsung 4K television, and called it "as wonderful as in the theater."

    "Apple is notable for the panache its products deliver," wrote Snider. "Apple devotees who have already embraced 4K -- or plan to do so soon -- will certainly want to give the new Apple TV a look."

    Key takeaways

    All of the reviewers noted that surround sound options peak at Dolby 7.1 -- with no inclusion of Atmos. Also, there remains to be no television content from Apple available in 4K.

    In short, it appears that the Apple TV 4K is squarely aimed at those who benefitted from prior purchases, and the free update to 4K HDR versions, where available.

    AppleInsider evaluation is forthcoming

    AppleInsider staffers have a variety of setups integrating the Apple TV. In a series of examinations of the device, we will be looking at not only streaming to the device from the Internet, but also the device performs across a local area network in conjunction with how the iTunes and Apple TV 4K combination deals with user-supplied 4K content.

    Additionally, we will examine the device in an assortment of environments ranging from a small office to a home theater set up in a living room.
    4K is 5 years away. If it happens... it’s the least explained gimmick ever.

    4k is a differentiating function the nearly profitless television set makers have forced on us early to explain away the strange pricing of a flat panel monitor in 2017.

     I could go even deeper on this but I feel like I’m gonna lose people if I explain it but the bottom line is that 4K TVs will not happen until 4K monitors (computer monitors) are known and used as equals and the coalesce around a common codec. FYI there’s no money in content creation created for YouTube so this open source nonsense is as usual underunformed. Patel sucks.  

    for example a 65 inch uhd tv is about 1k at Best Buy today and provided the content played on it is native 4K that’s a great deal. But the 300$ 1080p one next to it is the real steal because it’s 300$ and plays all ur stuff.

    comparatively if I booted my pc to play gtav in 4K I would be told to buy a 4k monitor that per pixel would cost thousands for an equally sized unit (they don’t exist) but we’re I to ignore that and  hook my 4K gaming rig to that same tv - the 1000$ Tv would display the game in full 4K (after messing in settings a bit)

    the industry literally doesn’t know what to sell and that’s doing nothing for pushing the content creators to pick a flipping codec for sound or video. We still are being told that there different things when the singles both digital and using the same hdmi cord. 

     Until a 4K OTA signal is pumped through for free (which would require gov’t mandate just like the HD conversion did) there’s very little reason to heavily invest in the format when you have a lifetime sized collection of awesome hd stuff.

    Can’t help but notice that a whole lot of “coming soon” tech was added after the products were released... Way more than usual. 

    Also I only consume I have no idea how complex it is to promise, invent, market and release a perfect product... 

    im concerned that they lean to heavy on my trust and yours when they fall short - even for the best reasons. 

    What I’d appreciate more is a whole lot less of reading about the Verges or Patel’s opinions on Apple insider’s website as opposed to me going there and reading it for myself which I wouldn’t do

     there could not be a more biased blog

     Having said all that the problem with 4K is that there is not enough original 4K content made by the content creators not the Streamers not the publishers - anyone but the firms and studios themselves that put it out there unless it is in 4K to begin with it’s essentially upscaled

     Upscaled always means less. The benefit is they’re providing you the best version of what they could give you but it’s never going to be the full version if it wasnt it filmed in 4K

    It gets even more complicated if you start factoring in where in the stream of their upscaling it is happening,  on the streamer ? is it happening on the television?  is it happening at the studio ?

    all of those things matter

    so basically unless it’s in 4K to begin with it’s upscaled on some level and therefore not what they’re selling nor should we be expecting that it will come that way

    they can’t magically turn content 1080p into 4K

     Cd players cannot play tapes
    tape players could not play VHS tapes and eight tracks should have never happened

    they’re doing us a favor it’s not something to review or not review it’s a favor they simply cannot make 4K out of not 4K content. 

    use your brains friends. HBO has no money to make by offering its free for subscribers streaming service HBOGo (which it no longer makes people pay for because they have HBO now) in 4K - that makes no sense

    it it makes me crazy that he’s using HBO as an example of a “con” when it’s clearly an iTunes device is just ridiculous and that it’s quoted here is even more ridiculous

    Also the whole sticker idea that someone said...  about putting a sticker on the bottom 👊

    im not gonna put a sticker on the bottom of my $200 remote when I can just flip it over 

    Hannah dropping the ball with the apps on the television because frankly it should be just a giant iPhone and you letting that you can use for stuff that’s more graphically intensive say I’m looking at your stupid  6 inch phone

    They should build it out and make it the iOS Mac Mini that’s what it is anyway

     theyd probably sell more

    filled with ideas today lol
    I 0909898

    You have your prices WAY OFF.

    The price difference between a 1080p and 4k set is only about $100-$200.  
    Yea. 4K TV's are pretty standard now, they aren't expensive. You can buy a 50inch 4K TV for much less than the cost of an iPhone.
  • Reply 20 of 35
    sog35 said:
    Having my HD videos turn into 4k videos for FREE is the killer feature.

    That alone will pay for the ATV 4k
    Well, not really "free" since the device costs twice as much as the competition. The 4K fee is cooked into the price of the unit.
Sign In or Register to comment.