Apple Watch Series 3 teardown finds slightly bigger battery, few other changes beyond LTE

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in Apple Watch
A teardown of the Apple Watch Series 3 published on Monday found that the device is largely similar to the Series 2, but with some redesign work to accommodate LTE technology.




The LTE version of the Series 3 includes "a whole new section" of RF chips, including an ST Microelectronics part believed to be the eSIM, iFixit said. Other parts come from the likes of Avago and SkyWorks, and of course Apple, which has touted its W2 wireless chip as providing better power effiency and faster Wi-Fi connections.




The Series 3 battery is a 1.07 watt-hour unit, up almost 4 percent from the 1.03 watt-hours in the Series 2. That indicates that Apple is relying heavily on chip improvements elsewhere -- such as the W2 -- to compensate for the power demands of LTE.

The Watch's barometric altimeter has been relocated to the case, next to the microphone. Notably, while an altimeter was present in the Series 2, Apple didn't make an announcement of the technology until the newer model.

iFixit gave the Series 3 a 6 out of 10 on its repairability scale, suggesting that while most logic board repairs are impossible and replacing component cables involves microsoldering, owners can theoretically replace the screen and battery as long as they have the right tools.

The product first hit shelves and doorsteps on Friday. The company is already trying to fix a problem with unauthenticated Wi-Fi networks which can prevent a Watch from connecting to LTE.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,180member
    What, so I can’t fix it myself, add more memory or a bigger hard drive??

    NO SALE!

    maestro64EsquireCatspscooter63slprescottairnerdwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 16
      Rayz2016 said:
    What, so I can’t fix it myself, add more memory or a bigger hard drive??

    NO SALE!


    Kind of like people can not fix their own Rolex... should not be a surprise with Apple now bigger than Rolex... :'(
    jbdragonstanhopeairnerdwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 16
    An old iPod nano was not much larger and I was able to repair it a couple of times to extend its life. Not sure I want to try that with a watch but interesting that I potentially can.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 16
    Disappointed the steel/sapphire series only comes with cellular. 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 5 of 16
    MacProMacPro Posts: 16,952member
    I bet it's a little larger when the add the 'beam me up Scotty' hardware.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    netmage said:
    Disappointed the steel/sapphire series only comes with cellular. 
    Yet doesn’t require that you actually put it on a plan. 


    stanhopewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 16
    I've been impressed with the battery life on my Series 3 watch since I got it on Friday. Yesterday, for example, I took my watch off charge around 9 AM and by midnight I still had a 64% charge. That includes several short calls as well as a 10 mile "active" bike ride. Not too shabby and much better than my Series 2 watch.
    Rayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 16
    So if the series two has an altimeter can you get it to turn on?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 16
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,166member
    chopper09 said:
    So if the series two has an altimeter can you get it to turn on?
    I wonder if anyone has checked that with OS 4? If it’s available, it should be seen in the health app, along with steps.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 16
    So, another nonsense from Fixit, little change... Except the CPU, LTE, storage and battery, well ... Oh, it is a lot of change then,
    Not sure why they repeat that every time. What on earth would qualify as big change? Shuffling the components around randomly.
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 11 of 16
    During impacts (not necessarily directly to the device, but to the wrist) or under excessive heat (like a jacket rubbing on it), the battery on the prior model that looked like that can "pop" ..it still functions, but the expansion causes pressure to be exerted on the bottom of the screen, which eventually lifts up and begins dangling from the device by its tiny flex cable, which eventually snaps. The End.

    Batteries have been known to do more than bloat up like that and perhaps a new criteria should be added for selecting an Apple Watch band: how fast it can be removed in an emergency...
  • Reply 12 of 16
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,166member
    During impacts (not necessarily directly to the device, but to the wrist) or under excessive heat (like a jacket rubbing on it), the battery on the prior model that looked like that can "pop" ..it still functions, but the expansion causes pressure to be exerted on the bottom of the screen, which eventually lifts up and begins dangling from the device by its tiny flex cable, which eventually snaps. The End.

    Batteries have been known to do more than bloat up like that and perhaps a new criteria should be added for selecting an Apple Watch band: how fast it can be removed in an emergency...
    What?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 16
    During impacts (not necessarily directly to the device, but to the wrist) or under excessive heat (like a jacket rubbing on it), the battery on the prior model that looked like that can "pop" ..it still functions, but the expansion causes pressure to be exerted on the bottom of the screen, which eventually lifts up and begins dangling from the device by its tiny flex cable, which eventually snaps. The End.

    Batteries have been known to do more than bloat up like that and perhaps a new criteria should be added for selecting an Apple Watch band: how fast it can be removed in an emergency...
    Wth are you talking about. The battery pops the screen if it has problems and expands, not because of rubbing or impact

    if the impact is strong enough to puncture the battery you would   likely  be mangled beyond recognition from that impact and would have other issues to worry about.
  • Reply 14 of 16
    Rayz2016 said:
    What, so I can’t fix it myself, add more memory or a bigger hard drive??

    NO SALE!

    Actually, not even Apple can repair them -- at least not internal issues.

    When my the haptic engine on my watch stopped working the genius bar said they could not even diagnose it themselves -- so they sent it to an Apple Watch repair site -- who just replaced the watch rather than repairing it. 
  • Reply 15 of 16
    netmage said:
    Disappointed the steel/sapphire series only comes with cellular. 
    Yet doesn’t require that you actually put it on a plan. 


    Then why pay for LTE chip? That is a seventy dollar addition. Apple once again taking away choices for the customer. 
  • Reply 16 of 16
    netmage said:
    Disappointed the steel/sapphire series only comes with cellular. 
    Yet doesn’t require that you actually put it on a plan. 


    Then why pay for LTE chip? That is a seventy dollar addition. Apple once again taking away choices for the customer. 
    ROFl...  That's like complaining that Cadillac doesn't offer any cars without Air Conditioning.   If you want high end products you get high end features.   Deal with it.
    jony0
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