Apple Maps vehicles to start touring Scotland & Wales later this month

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple Maps vehicles will begin collecting street-level data in Scotland and Wales for the first time later in October, according to an updated schedule.




Vehicles will initially roam Fort William in Scotland, and Bridgend County Borough in Wales. Exact dates are unknown, but collection should kick off sometime between Oct. 9 and 22, ending by Nov. 5.

Apple has been vague about the reasons for needing vehicles, saying only that it wants to "collect data which will be used to improve Apple Maps," some of which should be "published in future Apple Maps updates." Like Google, the company has said it's blurring any faces and license plates in recorded images.

Apple, though, doesn't have an equivalent of the Street View mode in Google Maps, which suggests either that it will eventually add one, or that the company is simply looking to obtain high-level road detail. Indeed Apple's vehicles are fitted not just with cameras but advanced sensors such as LiDAR.

Apple could conceivably apply the data to its self-driving car platform. Work is currently believed to be focused on software, with the eventual goal of use in a ridehailing service -- likely a partner firm however, rather than one run by Apple.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    Use the TrueDepth camera for 3D (if there are enough available)
    calimizhou
  • Reply 2 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,100member
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
  • Reply 3 of 17
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,632member
    I don't understand why Apple is so slow to get every road and walking space mapped.
  • Reply 4 of 17
    Soli said:
    I don't understand why Apple is so slow to get every road and walking space mapped.
    It might very well be a as mundane and impossible task to map every corner of the world and every sheep running around.  And then to keep it updated...
    Why would Google crowdsource this effort to the public as of recently ? 
    Are Apple's methodologies significantly better than Google's - or does their overload of cash make for some insane decision making ?
    edited October 2017
  • Reply 5 of 17
    entropys said:
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
    If Apple released the product in one area at a time, I sense you would complain about that. You have the bases covered for complaining, which is your right.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 17

    Bacillus3 said:
    Soli said:
    I don't understand why Apple is so slow to get every road and walking space mapped.
    It might very well be a as mundane and impossible task to map every corner of the world and every sheep running around.  And then to keep it updated...
    Why would Google crowdsource this effort to the public as of recently ? 
    Are Apple's methodologies significantly better than Google's - or does their overload of cash make for some insane decision making ?
    If Google is crowdsourcing the effort to the public then in my opinion Google is attempting to move faster to stay ahead of whatever Apple might develop. The problem I see for Google's outsourcing is data validation. Humanity has an uncanny knack for screwing data just for the fun of doing so.
  • Reply 7 of 17
    Just got back from two weeks of touring in England via rental car and public transit. Used Apple Maps and navigation for everything. Worked superbly, though I blew through a lot of data. London bus and tube navigation was especially good. Thanks Apple. 
    chiabb-15argonaut
  • Reply 8 of 17




    That is one lovely picture. It could almost pass off as a painting.
    chia
  • Reply 9 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,100member
    entropys said:
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
    If Apple released the product in one area at a time, I sense you would complain about that. You have the bases covered for complaining, which is your right.
    Yes I would. At the least I would expect Apple to roll it out globally as quick as google did. In fact, I hold Apple to a higher standard than google, and for street level stuff, seeing as it already has Google's example, Apple should be able to raise the bar quite a bit. How many years have they been doing this now?
  • Reply 10 of 17
    adm1adm1 Posts: 831member




    That is one lovely picture. It could almost pass off as a painting.
    I believe that's Portree, on the Isle of Skye. Plenty of wee fishing villages around here have mad paint schemes. 

    My issue with Apple Maps in Scotland was the search - not the actual map itself. I'd search for a street or town I know is approx 20miles away and it gives me a result from somewhere in the USA and offers directions. wtf. Many of the streets in my own town were not found if I typed them in, but if I zoomed in, the street names showed up so I'm not sure if these camera cars will help with that.
    chiaargonaut
  • Reply 11 of 17
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,368member

    Bacillus3 said:
    Soli said:
    I don't understand why Apple is so slow to get every road and walking space mapped.
    It might very well be a as mundane and impossible task to map every corner of the world and every sheep running around.  And then to keep it updated...
    Why would Google crowdsource this effort to the public as of recently ? 
    Are Apple's methodologies significantly better than Google's - or does their overload of cash make for some insane decision making ?
    If Google is crowdsourcing the effort to the public then in my opinion Google is attempting to move faster to stay ahead of whatever Apple might develop. The problem I see for Google's outsourcing is data validation. Humanity has an uncanny knack for screwing data just for the fun of doing so.
    ... and we are talking Android users for the most part I'd guess.  A new huge database of mom and dads' basements. ;)
  • Reply 12 of 17
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,368member





    That is one lovely picture. It could almost pass off as a painting.
    Knowing the place well I can say for sure this was modified with in a photo editor to the point where it may as well be a painting.  Picturesque sure, those colors ... not so much.  It is one of my favorite parts of the world.  I was based in Edinburgh for many years but I've been in USA for nearly 30 years and the north west of Scotland's scenery is about the only thing I miss from UK apart from pork pies and bacon with meat ;)
    argonaut
  • Reply 13 of 17
    Wait. I thought we weren't supposed to like Street View:
    http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/08/30/apples_ios_6_3d_flyovers_aim_to_be_more_helpful_less_creepy_than_google_street_view

    Then again, we've been told that no one wants wireless charging, contactless payments, or a phone larger than an iPhone 5.
     



    Soli
  • Reply 14 of 17
    entropys said:
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
    Me too. I'm not even frustrated that they haven't rolled out the new Maps yet. It seems clear that Apple has an incredible vision for Apple Maps as an augmented reality playground. All the pieces are in place, and it should be pretty amazing once released. I love Apple Maps currently (it's gotten a lot better), so I have no problem patiently yet eagerly waiting for the big update.

    You can relax about the glaciers. AGW is about 90% myth. The following statements are verifiable facts:
    -CO2 correlation does not equal causation, it is actually expected. When water (i.e. ocean) heats up, volatile gases, like CO2, are released.
    -CO2 makes up only 0.04% of the earth's atmosphere, and furthermore, it doesn't even absorb the primary IR wavelengths emitted from earth's surface. In other words, the black body effect is minimal.
    -Historically, CO2 rises *after* the temperature rises, which again is expected. And, historically, ice ages are triggered at *peak* CO2 levels. There is something else driving global temperature fluctuations, and scientists don't know what it is.
    -Nearly every headline about the catastrophic effects of AGW are based on worst-case scenarios (from otherwise mild scientific studies) which are in turn based on historically inaccurate algorithms that are then extrapolated 60-1000 years into the future.
    -Many of the proponents of AGW are hypocritical opportunists with no credibility. Take al gore, for example, who made $70-$100 million dollars by selling his Current TV to an oil-producing, terrorist-sponsoring country.
    edited October 2017
  • Reply 15 of 17
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,368member
    Wait. I thought we weren't supposed to like Street View:
    http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/08/30/apples_ios_6_3d_flyovers_aim_to_be_more_helpful_less_creepy_than_google_street_view

    Then again, we've been told that no one wants wireless charging, contactless payments, or a phone larger than an iPhone 5.
     



    Having just gone from an iPhone 5 to a 7 Plus after the priced dropped on 7 family, I have to retract any comment I ever made regarding the last part of your comment.  How did I ever use the 5?  I love the 7 Plus to bits.
  • Reply 16 of 17
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,368member

    entropys said:
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
    Me too. I'm not even frustrated that they haven't rolled out the new Maps yet. It seems clear that Apple has an incredible vision for Apple Maps as an augmented reality playground. All the pieces are in place, and it should be pretty amazing once released. I love Apple Maps currently (it's gotten a lot better), so I have no problem patiently yet eagerly waiting for the big update.

    You can relax about the glaciers. AGW is about 90% myth. The following statements are verifiable facts:
    -CO2 correlation does not equal causation, it is actually expected. When water (i.e. ocean) heats up, volatile gases, like CO2, are released.
    -CO2 makes up 0.04% of the earth's atmosphere, and furthermore, it doesn't even absorb the primary IR wavelengths emitted from earth's surface. In other words, the black body effect is minimal.
    -Historically, CO2 rises *after* the temperature rises, which again is expected. And, historically, ice ages are triggered at *peak* CO2 levels. There is something else driving global temperature fluctuations, and scientists don't know what it is.
    -Nearly every headline about the catastrophic effects of AGW are based on worst-case scenarios (from otherwise mild scientific studies) which are in turn based on historically inaccurate algorithms that are then extrapolated 60-1000 years into the future.
    -Many of the proponents of AGW are hypocritical sociopaths with no credibility. Take al gore, for example, who made $70-$100 million dollars by selling his Current TV to an oil-producing, terrorist-sponsoring country.
    So you and a minuscule number scientists on Earth are in agreement, well  whoop-de-doo.  
  • Reply 17 of 17
    MacPro said:

    entropys said:
    I am so looking forward to this once it is a global product.

    Meanwhile, the glaciers will melt first, and I feel like it's a bit like skating to where the puck was in last week's game.
    Me too. I'm not even frustrated that they haven't rolled out the new Maps yet. It seems clear that Apple has an incredible vision for Apple Maps as an augmented reality playground. All the pieces are in place, and it should be pretty amazing once released. I love Apple Maps currently (it's gotten a lot better), so I have no problem patiently yet eagerly waiting for the big update.

    You can relax about the glaciers. AGW is about 90% myth. The following statements are verifiable facts:
    -CO2 correlation does not equal causation, it is actually expected. When water (i.e. ocean) heats up, volatile gases, like CO2, are released.
    -CO2 makes up 0.04% of the earth's atmosphere, and furthermore, it doesn't even absorb the primary IR wavelengths emitted from earth's surface. In other words, the black body effect is minimal.
    -Historically, CO2 rises *after* the temperature rises, which again is expected. And, historically, ice ages are triggered at *peak* CO2 levels. There is something else driving global temperature fluctuations, and scientists don't know what it is.
    -Nearly every headline about the catastrophic effects of AGW are based on worst-case scenarios (from otherwise mild scientific studies) which are in turn based on historically inaccurate algorithms that are then extrapolated 60-1000 years into the future.
    -Many of the proponents of AGW are hypocritical sociopaths with no credibility. Take al gore, for example, who made $70-$100 million dollars by selling his Current TV to an oil-producing, terrorist-sponsoring country.
    So you and a minuscule number scientists on Earth are in agreement, well  whoop-de-doo.  
    You misunderstand.

    1) I agree with the majority of scientists surveyed that humans have some impact on the climate.

    However..

    2) The (incontrovertible) evidence, some of which I posted above, shows that humans' affect on the climate* is minimal, at least insofar as CO2 is concerned. Those are not nitpicked facts I cited. They are established facts that address core theory of AGW.

    Based on the repeated onslaughts of AGW hyperbole from the media, I can see how this would be difficult to accept. I encourage you to critically analyze my argument, and objectively verify, or challenge any statements or facts I presented.

    *Not to be confused with the environment, on which humans have an enormous impact through habitat destruction, species extinction, pollution, etc. It's beyond sad that this CO2 bs draws so many needed resources away from these genuinely catastrophic issues that are occurring this moment, not issues that will theoretically occur 100 years from now based on worst-case scenarios.
    edited October 2017
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