iPhone X took over two years to develop, marks new chapter in iPhone design, says Jony Ive...

Posted:
in iPhone edited October 2017
In a brief interview with Japanese design magazine Casa Brutus, Apple's Chief Design Officer Jony Ive dropped a few interesting tidbits about the development, future technological implications and public reception of iPhone X.




According to Ive, who was interviewed by Casa Brutus in Cupertino, Calif., after last month's iPhone event, iPhone X represents one of the most difficult projects Apple has undertaken, with an incubation period of more than two years.

That the product was ready in time for iPhone's 10th anniversary in 2017 was a "wonderful coincidence," Ive said.

Discussing the inner workings of iPhone X, Ive said the inclusion of Face ID is the culmination of years of work toward a non-contact user interface. From a user's perspective, features that do not require physical interaction make a device feel simpler, yet at the same time more robust. Ive goes on to say the replacement of Touch ID, a capacitive fingerprint reading solution included in all iPhone models since iPhone 5s, equates to a heightened user experience.

On the handset's design, Ive said previous models felt like a combination of many different parts, the most obvious being the chassis and display. With iPhone X, the design feels contiguous and integrated. It took many years to achieve that level of fit and finish, Ive said, adding that Apple is already working on next-generation designs.

Looking back to the first iPhone, Ive said multitouch, a feature smartphone users now take for granted, was both its most important feature and the biggest design challenge. Building a new hardware platform meant miniaturizing and incorporating cutting edge components, but also required a rethinking of human interface guidelines.

Over the past ten years iPhone has transformed from a simple telephone/internet/music device to become something much more integral to daily life. That transition continues today, as Ive remembers first using iPhone for phone calls, then video calls with FaceTime and later emoji in iMessage. With iPhone X and the depth-sensing TrueDepth camera system, owners can communicate with Animoji, Apple's marketing term for emoji characters that animate based on a user's facial expressions.

Instead of thinking of iPhone X as the ultimate expression of "iPhone," Ive said the device represents a new chapter in the platform's history.

Japanese blog Mac Otakara reported on the Casa Brutus interview earlier today.
don_stone
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 90
    Of course it was. I can’t believe people are stupid enough to think that something like FaceID was added at the last minute because TouchID under the screen wasn’t ready. Or that Apple sits around to see what others do and then copies them.

    If you want a perfect example of a device rushed to market look at Andy Rubins Essential Phone. Despite being in development for some time it reeks of rushing to market. Lousy camera (compared to other flagships) and lots of software issues. Then you have the iFixit teardown, giving it a 1 out of 10 score and noting the inside looks like a bunch of parts just thrown together.
    lostkiwichiaradarthekatredgeminipaMacProspherictdknoxedredlkruppnetmage
  • Reply 2 of 90
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    But my teen friends in 9th grade say the original iPhone was developed in a few weeks!!

    Wouldn’t iPhone X take a few days?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 90
    Of course it was. I can’t believe people are stupid enough to think that something like FaceID was added at the last minute because TouchID under the screen wasn’t ready. Or that Apple sits around to see what others do and then copies them.
    You mean Ming Chi Kuo’s anonymous sources were wrong (aka full of shit).  I just can’t believe it.

    Nor can I believe that Apple would introduce a technology it couldn’t produce in volume (mom Kuo bullshit). 
    JWSCwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 90
    mr omr o Posts: 1,040member
    At first I was horrified, but I must admit, the notch has grown on me … I really like it, it makes the iPhone distinguishable.

    A silver back would make this iPhone truly irresistible. With chrome edges, it would make iPhone X very reminiscent to the original iPhone. Perhaps with iPhone X series 2?

    >:x
    kitatitmike54JWSCDon.Andersenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 90
    mike54mike54 Posts: 146member
    Yea, the notch is fine. The cameras and speaker need to be there, and the ears are handy showing the important info. It really maximises the use of the whole front area.
    Hope that FaceID works as intended and that there won't be any manufacturing or design faults when its released. 
    redgeminipanetmageschlackJWSCrepressthiswatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 6 of 90
    You will see that people will start using FaceID just like TouchID (and they gonna love it). People always criticize all new things. 
    schlackjbdragonJWSCStrangeDaysrepressthislolliverwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 90
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,158member

    AuthenTec before Apple made it into Touch ID





    PrimeSense before Apple made it into Face ID


    chiaradarthekatredgeminipaanantksundaramsphericLukeCagetdknoxnetmagerandominternetpersonpatchythepirate
  • Reply 8 of 90
    I can see where the iPhone X is the culmination of years of work and development on many levels.
    But, as Ive's says, rather than being a revolution: 
    ....."the device represents a new chapter in the platform's history".

    If you look at the device as 'just another computer' or a "platform", the truth of that statement becomes clear.   The possibilities of a computer you can carry in your pocket are as unlimited as the possibilities of a computer you can carry in your briefcase were in 1995 -- and maybe more so.

    So often here on ai, I hear people speak of desktops, laptops, tablets and phones as being almost sacred where boundaries cannot be broached:  Their vision is limited to just more of the same -- just faster.   Yet, they are all just computers with the main difference being shape and size.  They all have input & output sources, CPUs, GPUs, storage, memory and some software...  

    They're just computers...  
     
    zompJWSC
  • Reply 9 of 90
    neilmneilm Posts: 515member
    mr o said:
    A silver back would make this iPhone truly irresistible. With chrome edges, it would make iPhone X very reminiscent to the original iPhone. Perhaps with iPhone X series 2?

    >:x
    Because its metallic content a would impede "wireless" charging, a silver back isn't likely to happen.
    SoundJudgmentnetmagejbdragonrepressthislollivermr owatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 90
    I can see where the iPhone X is the culmination of years of work and development on many levels.
    But, as Ive's says, rather than being a revolution: 
    ....."the device represents a new chapter in the platform's history".

    If you look at the device as 'just another computer' or a "platform", the truth of that statement becomes clear.   The possibilities of a computer you can carry in your pocket are as unlimited as the possibilities of a computer you can carry in your briefcase were in 1995 -- and maybe more so.

    So often here on ai, I hear people speak of desktops, laptops, tablets and phones as being almost sacred where boundaries cannot be broached:  Their vision is limited to just more of the same -- just faster.   Yet, they are all just computers with the main difference being shape and size.  They all have input & output sources, CPUs, GPUs, storage, memory and some software...  

    They're just computers...  
     
    That's what Skynet wants you to think.
    edredJWSCrepressthiswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 90
    neilm said:
    mr o said:
    A silver back would make this iPhone truly irresistible. With chrome edges, it would make iPhone X very reminiscent to the original iPhone. Perhaps with iPhone X series 2?

    >:x
    Because its metallic content a would impede "wireless" charging, a silver back isn't likely to happen.
    Plus it would get EXTREMELY hot from the sun
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 90
    holyoneholyone Posts: 349member
    "Discussing the inner workings of iPhone X, Ive said the inclusion of Face ID is the culmination of years of work toward a non-contact user interface. From a user's perspective, features that do not require physical interaction make a device feel simpler, yet at the same time more robust. Ive goes on to say the replacement of Touch ID, a capacitive fingerprint reading solution included in all iPhone models since iPhone 5s, equates to a heightened user experience." Wow Jony what dubious reasoning, sure raising the iPhone and have it ready and unlocked with out interaction is less friction, but the home button paradigm was just as simple considering that you don't just look at iPhone X and have it read youre mind thus forfulling this zero interaction premiss, you still have to touch the phone to interacting with it and since you're going to touch the phone any ways using one of those " touchese" for biometric features is just as clean I think. The fact is the iPhone user experience is still firmly interaction heavy and very much "heightened", IMO killing touch ID is a horrendous mistake and is testament to Apple being technology drunk, technological fetuses are just being thrown in there for technology sake with weak and half assed though, the touch bar in MBP's which though not completely useless is just there because Apple can put it there and serves little els, the cylindrical Mac which looked great but was as a result of technology allowing it and no other consideration, if you looking at where those things are now its disappointing. Personally I'm thrilled with Face ID I've been hoping for it on the MBs and iMacs forever but it should have been in addition to Touch ID not replacement for it, not that the X in not great, but Face ID seems like a fan boy geeking out with little thought beyond the obvious, this becomes clear if you unbiasedly consider "simplicity" in touch ID Apple pay and face ID Apple pay. But hey who cares when all that matters is profits on top of profits, shout out to sog 35 ;) and to Strange Days and gang unless to challenge points above please spare me, thanks
  • Reply 13 of 90
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,158member
    MacRumors are going nuts about this interview with Jony Ive. They keep saying that if it's not about the 10 year anniversary they why call it iPhone X. Clearly that's the marketing department capitalizing on the timing, not the technology involved to create this amazing jump into the future of the iPhone.
    pscooter63StrangeDaysrepressthislolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 90
    tshapitshapi Posts: 269member
    Nor can I believe that Apple would introduce a technology it couldn’t produce in volume (mom Kuo bullshit). 
    I kind of believe that. They are producing it in volume. Just not the volume they traditionally would. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 90
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,447member
    Soli said:
    MacRumors are going nuts about this interview with Jony Ive. They keep saying that if it's not about the 10 year anniversary they why call it iPhone X. Clearly that's the marketing department capitalizing on the timing, not the technology involved to create this amazing jump into the future of the iPhone.
    I don't see what's so difficult to understand. 

    They've been developing this generation of iPhone for several years. That it would be ready to announce on the tenth anniversary is a happy coincidence, which I'm sure became an internal target at some point, so they took the opportunity and named it "X" to commemorate that.

    Why the hell would anybody get in a tizzy over that? What is there even to discuss about the obvious?
    SoliGG1netmagerandominternetpersonpscooter63JWSCStrangeDaysrepressthisfastasleeplolliver
  • Reply 16 of 90
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,156member
    holyone said:
    "Discussing the inner workings of iPhone X, Ive said the inclusion of Face ID is the culmination of years of work toward a non-contact user interface. From a user's perspective, features that do not require physical interaction make a device feel simpler, yet at the same time more robust. Ive goes on to say the replacement of Touch ID, a capacitive fingerprint reading solution included in all iPhone models since iPhone 5s, equates to a heightened user experience." Wow Jony what dubious reasoning, sure raising the iPhone and have it ready and unlocked with out interaction is less friction, but the home button paradigm was just as simple considering that you don't just look at iPhone X and have it read youre mind thus forfulling this zero interaction premiss, you still have to touch the phone to interacting with it and since you're going to touch the phone any ways using one of those " touchese" for biometric features is just as clean I think. The fact is the iPhone user experience is still firmly interaction heavy and very much "heightened", IMO killing touch ID is a horrendous mistake and is testament to Apple being technology drunk, technological fetuses are just being thrown in there for technology sake with weak and half assed though, the touch bar in MBP's which though not completely useless is just there because Apple can put it there and serves little els, the cylindrical Mac which looked great but was as a result of technology allowing it and no other consideration, if you looking at where those things are now its disappointing. Personally I'm thrilled with Face ID I've been hoping for it on the MBs and iMacs forever but it should have been in addition to Touch ID not replacement for it, not that the X in not great, but Face ID seems like a fan boy geeking out with little thought beyond the obvious, this becomes clear if you unbiasedly consider "simplicity" in touch ID Apple pay and face ID Apple pay. But hey who cares when all that matters is profits on top of profits, shout out to sog 35 ;) and to Strange Days and gang unless to challenge points above please spare me, thanks
    NP;DR

    (No Paragraphs; Didn’t Read)
    Solitdknoxretrogustodotcomctonetmagetmaymrboba1pscooter63sphericphilboogie
  • Reply 17 of 90
    holyoneholyone Posts: 349member
    don_stone said:
    You will see that people will start using FaceID just like TouchID (and they gonna love it). People always criticize all new things. 
    Every horrible idea Apple has had and evetually abandoned was at the point of announcement also new and amazing, something bieng new is no justification for it bieng better, yes Face ID is a much much better biometric feature than Touch ID, but it's no where near as good as ( Touch ID + Face ID together) would be no?
  • Reply 18 of 90
    tshapitshapi Posts: 269member
    Of course it was. I can’t believe people are stupid enough to think that something like FaceID was added at the last minute because TouchID under the screen wasn’t ready. Or that Apple sits around to see what others do and then copies them.
    I do also think that face id was intended to accompany Touch ID, but since they couldn’t get Touch ID to work to there standards under the screen they went on the PR stance that it was always intended to replace Touch ID. 

    First of all, face id apparently can’t handle multiple faces atm. So retina id or Touch ID would rectify this. 
    repressthis
  • Reply 19 of 90
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,156member
    don_stone said:
    You will see that people will start using FaceID just like TouchID (and they gonna love it). People always criticize all new things. 
    Well, new things from Apple anyway. 

    Good piece though. Ive won’t be happy until he delivers a wafer-thin slab of glass that reads minds. 
    asdasdrepressthiswatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 90
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,158member
    spheric said:
    Soli said:
    MacRumors are going nuts about this interview with Jony Ive. They keep saying that if it's not about the 10 year anniversary they why call it iPhone X. Clearly that's the marketing department capitalizing on the timing, not the technology involved to create this amazing jump into the future of the iPhone.
    I don't see what's so difficult to understand. 

    They've been developing this generation of iPhone for several years. That it would be ready to announce on the tenth anniversary is a happy coincidence, which I'm sure became an internal target at some point, so they took the opportunity and named it "X" to commemorate that.

    Why the hell would anybody get in a tizzy over that? What is there even to discuss about the obvious?
    And it's not really the 10th anniversary except for the calendar year. The original iPhone was announced in January 2007 and release in June 2007. It wasn't until the iPhone 4s in 2011 that they moved from a Summer release to an Autumn release. If component supplies were just a little off or some SW was too far behind we could've easily seen this get a release date the next calendar year, which isn't uncommon for Apple.
    repressthis
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