Bogus version of 'Cuphead' appears on Apple's App Store, developer gets it pulled [u]

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2017
A fake version of Studio MDHR's popular animated platform shooter, "Cuphead," appeared on the App Store on Monday, drawing attention to the problem of copycat mobile apps.




The release was confirmed as bogus in an email to AppleInsider from Studio MDHR's Director of Experience, Ryan Moldenhauer. The fake app is still available, and $4.99, whereas the original Xbox and Windows versions are $19.99 apiece.




"We don't have any message other than that we would like to warn 'Cuphead' fans that it is not legitimate, and that we are working on having the infringing app removed," Moldenhauer told AppleInsider.

A bogus website was set up for the title, that still says that an iOS version is "coming soon."

In the real "Cuphead," one or two players take on a series of lengthy boss fights, intermixed with occasional side challenges. Much of the attention around the game has revolved around its hand-animated art, done in the style of 1930s cartoons like Max Fleischer's. The game also has an original jazz soundtrack, which hit ninth place on Billboard's Jazz Albums chart.

The game has garnered a reputation as being one of the most difficult action games available, even in its Simple mode.





Popular games are often imitated on the App Store, but direct thefts are less common. It is not clear how the malicious version passed Apple's reviews process.

Update: The developer has succeeded in the bid to get the title removed. AppleInsider suggests anyone who may have purchased the app to request a refund from Apple through the normal channels.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    Already down. I can't find it searching for Cuphead or the StudioMDHR
  • Reply 2 of 12
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,276member
    On another site it's been reported there's other bogus/fake/possibly malicious apps that Apple has now been made aware of. 
  • Reply 3 of 12
    “...we are working on having the infringing app removed,” Moldenhauer told AppleInsider.

     :| 

    Priorities. If the demand is there, perhaps you should work on porting the game to iOS?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 12
    anomeanome Posts: 1,118member
    “...we are working on having the infringing app removed,” Moldenhauer told AppleInsider.

     :| 

    Priorities. If the demand is there, perhaps you should work on porting the game to iOS?
    Maybe they are, but don't they have an exclusive deal with MS that has to expire first? I think I heard that mentioned somewhere. I would expect if it does legitimately become available, there will be some fanfare, unless all the excitement's died down by then.
    LukeCage
  • Reply 5 of 12
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,817member
    Apple's review process strikes again... 
  • Reply 6 of 12
    I'm glad Appleinsider reported on this story like professionals, unlike some unnamed websites. Good on you Appleinsider
    nhughes
  • Reply 7 of 12
    What's great about being Apple customers is with this kind of case they will refund you promptly & completely. There is no way the review process will know about copyright issue. It doesn't mean to work like that.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 8 of 12
    “...we are working on having the infringing app removed,” Moldenhauer told AppleInsider.

     :| 

    Priorities. If the demand is there, perhaps you should work on porting the game to iOS?

    Actually, this may be a wake up call for them to port the game to iOS, but their priority should definitely be to get the fake app removed.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 9 of 12
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,313member
    I think the code and all the royalties should be handed over and then let them decide if they want to keep it on the store.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    I wonder how long it takes for Apple to pay developers, be they legitimate or not, and how much money the 'devs' may have received for their fake app, before it got the kibosh.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    One of my reasons for staying completely within the Apple ecosystem is the "walled garden." I'm not interested in being a security expert and curator, so I pay higher prices to get stuff from a supplier that ostensibly does that for me. I'm concerned that fake and even malicious apps are getting through. It feels like maybe I'm not getting everything I'm paying for.

    I realize that this likely happens less often with Apple than other platforms, and appreciate that issues are usually resolved in a fairly timely fashion, but any and every breach of the wall is another shot to my confidence. I'm not panicking or saying the sky is falling, but I am gradually becoming more wary, which makes me less likely to buy apps, services, and content.

    Is Apple becoming a victim of its own success? Is the curation workload overwhelming the people and systems that do it? Is the popularity of the platform making it a more frequent target than in the past? What, if anything, can be done to prevent things like this from happening? I'm experiencing fear, uncertainty, and doubt. Should I be?
  • Reply 12 of 12
    What happened when the app was run? Did some other developer actually port Cuphead to iOS? Or did this app just display non-playable video?

    The article here refers to the app as "malicious"; did it do something other than play a game?
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