Apple revises developer guidelines, restricts 'loot boxes' & amends template-generated app...

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2017
Apple's rule that prevented apps generated from commercial templates in the App Store has been modified, with the new rule allowing it if submitted by the provider of the app's data, rather than by the developer.




The revision, dated Dec. 20 was first spotted by TechCrunch. In the revision to section 4.2.6 of the App Store Guidelines requires the content provider to submit the app, or allows developers to generate a single binary to host all client content in an aggregated model, with separate entries for each client.

This will require small businesses, said to be most impacted by the rule change, to sign up for a developer's account, rather than relying on the contracted developer's account.

The move caught the attention of Congressman Ted W. Lieu (D-Calif), who wrote a letter to Apple. Congressman Lieu asked that Apple "examine possible changes" to the guidelines issued in June, as it was "casting too wide a net" while "weeding out several bad actors."

Following in the wake of the "Star Wars: Battlefront II" debacle about "loot boxes," the new guidelines require vendors to disclose the odds of receiving each possible item as a "drop" both for paid boxes, and for unpaid post-game rewards.

The purge began in June, with the initial rule change to section 4.2.6. At the same time, Apple was exterminating 32-bit titles, and other clones. However, the rule change had unintended consequences, hitting small businesses reliant on templates for menu apps, and similar methods of inexpensively getting an app together.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    I wonder if Apple's new guidelines have anything to do with the legal challenges around the world over loot boxes? It's going to be interesting to see when Belgium rules if loot boxes are considered gambling or not. All it takes is one ruling for the dominos to fall. This whole loot box issue and future legal rulings will definitely alter the gaming landscape. 
  • Reply 2 of 14
    Lieu is an awful politician. And whose interests are really being served by his intervention? 
    mike1
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,972administrator
    Lieu is an awful politician. And whose interests are really being served by his intervention? 
    Well, in this case, pretty clearly small businesses relying on templates for apps.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 4 of 14
    This is great news for folks like DropSource.  No, I don't have a dog in the fight, but these guys are making it unbelievably easy to produce iOS and mobile apps for the other guys too - I have heard they call it Android or something like that.
  • Reply 5 of 14
    That's what it was called: "Loot Boxes". My Kids are playing a game called "Animal Jam" It seems harmless enough for small cute animals dresses and chat online. However, the game also has different "boxes" that gives random items if you play these "gambling games". The more you play, it seems that you get more chances to "win" rare items. We had to limit how much time they play these types of games or they'd play all day all night.
  • Reply 6 of 14
    What was the Battlefront II debacle?
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 7 of 14
    Lieu is an awful politician. And whose interests are really being served by his intervention? 
    Well, in this case, pretty clearly small businesses relying on templates for apps.
    Should small businesses be nudged to use a website for getting information out if it doesn't involve the special capabilities of the phone?  Could save money.  And be way easier to maintain.  Should our money be better spent by Apple on a smaller App Store that has a vibrant set of offerings?
  • Reply 8 of 14
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,889member
    Lieu is an awful politician. And whose interests are really being served by his intervention? 
    Well, in this case, pretty clearly small businesses relying on templates for apps.
    Well it sure ain’t the consumer wanting quality apps. But I don’t know the guy myself and what his motives may be.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,941member
    Lieu is an awful politician. And whose interests are really being served by his intervention? 
    He just wanted to beat Chuck Shumer to the podium.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    What was the Battlefront II debacle?
    Loot Boxes essentially ruined the game. It was basically a pusdeo-gambling system for players to get better abilities and power ups. You pay for loot boxes and you might get some power ups you needed or not. No odds were posted. And, you could earn loot boxes, but it required such a ridiculous amount of playtime that they were basically unobtainable for free.

    Killed the game for me because if you didn't loot box, you were definitely playing at a disadvantage. 
    bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 11 of 14
    What was the Battlefront II debacle?
    The loot box system in Battlefront 2 made the game pay to win. I figured EA would do something like that when they announced there wasn't going to be a paid season pass like the first game. After public outcry, EA removed the paid loot boxes, but that decision came from Bob Iger at Disney. The kicker is the removal of microtransactions is only temporary so it will be interesting to see how they are added back into the game. 
    bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 12 of 14
    So glad this shit didnt exist when I was really into gaming. Instead game devs focused on making games fun rather than rigging them for microtransactions. Crazy, huh.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    Are you listening Transformers: Earth Wars?

    I paid $14.99(NZ) for a Dinobot bundle and literally ended up with three versions of Slug that I already had before getting a level 3 version of Strafe.

    If Apple is limiting this then freaking awesome.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    Thanks @Smaffei & @Boltsfan17 for the info.
Sign In or Register to comment.