TiVo's Next-Gen Platform aims to help cable TV providers stream to Apple TV, iPhone, iPad

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
TiVo has revealed a plan to make it as easy as possible for viewers to watch the programming they want, with the announced "Next-Gen Platform" claimed to help provide cable and streaming service providers device and operating system-agnostic methods for content distribution, including to the Apple TV, iPhone, and iPad.




The Next-Gen Platform is described as a framework that can manage and deliver content to subscribers of a cable TV or Internet TV service on the company's behalf, with the platform handling all tasks relating to making that content viewable on whatever hardware the customer wants to use. According to TiVo, this can include managed set-top boxes running on Linux and Android TV, as well as unmanaged devices like the Apple TV, via mobile apps, and viewing through a browser.

Customers of services electing to use the new platform will apparently benefit from TiVo's existing software and services, including personalized recommendations based on viewing habits, voice control in certain apps and hardware configurations, and more freedom about how they consume their content.

It also promises to help service providers capitalize on "new monetization opportunities" that may not have been previously accessible for the firms.

As part of the platform, the TiVo for Streamers element aims to help operators bring their services to unmanaged streaming devices, including the Apple TV, Amazon Fire, and Android TV, typically via an app made for the platform. The TiVo for Mobile segment will also operate through a custom app, which can be made to work as a standalone cloud-enabled IPTV service, as well as offering extra features when used with a set-top box.




For managed devices, such as cable set-top boxes, it has launched TiVo for Android TV and TiVo for Linux STBs, software that adds the personalization, conversational voice commands, and other elements to existing hardware. The software also enables the "seamless integration of content" across linear, over-the-top (OTT), DVR, and on-demand services like Netflix, and lets it work alongside other devices for multi-screen functionality.

Running on a cloud-based architecture that offers "rapid agility for faster time to market and scalability," the Next-Gen platform will also help cable providers make the transition to IPTV from the digital television standard QAM, with it able to operate in a hybrid capacity that operates using both technologies during migration.

For cable companies, TiVo's Next-Gen Platform may be seen as a way to keep up with pure Internet TV providers, to stem subscriber losses from customers electing to "cut the cord." Offering a way to provide their service via an iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV alongside other devices may give potential cord cutters a reason to stay with their existing subscription.

It isn't just Internet TV services that cable TV providers have to worry about, as on-demand services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video continue to produce original and exclusive content that have the capability of pulling customers away. Apple is also part of this second group, with multiple reports indicating it too is expanding its original content strategy to draw more users to its Apple Music subscription.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    It seems to me that further TV sources will come over the Internet, instead of Cable or Satellite. I've subscribed to DirecTV for 17 years and I think in the near future those days are numbered and will be way cheaper than what I pay now!
    bshank
  • Reply 2 of 15
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    It's a cable box, modem, wifi router in one box. Another opportunity to spend money. 
    bshank
  • Reply 3 of 15
    zroger73zroger73 Posts: 722member
    When the dust settles and the transition is complete, we'll be paying as much or more for internet and live/on-demand programming than we ever did for a cable TV and internet subscription. The cable companies are already adapting to ensure they don't lose revenue. I'm already paying almost as much for internet alone as what I was paying for internet and television just a few years ago.
    minicoffeegatorguygregoriusm
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Given that I'm a sports fan, I don't expect the total package to be cheaper going forward -- if anything, more expensive as the "basic cable" model collapses.

    But I'm a TiVo user from way back, currently using a single Bolt with two satellites (Minis). I'm mad at my cable provider for dropping Starz recently (or, more precisely, my wife is a big Outlander fan, so I'm mad that now we're going to have to either get Hulu or subscribe to Starz independently).

    If this new TiVo development allows cable providers to use a more à la carte approach then that would be great. Starz can charge whatever they want and I can decide if it's worth adding them to my lineup. I really don't need my cable company to decide that for me.

    Indeed, I'm snowed in today so I think I will do the math on cutting the cord. Will report back in this thread on my results if I get through it without too much chagrin.
    bshank
  • Reply 5 of 15
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    zroger73 said:
    When the dust settles and the transition is complete, we'll be paying as much or more for internet and live/on-demand programming than we ever did for a cable TV and internet subscription. The cable companies are already adapting to ensure they don't lose revenue. I'm already paying almost as much for internet alone as what I was paying for internet and television just a few years ago.
    This is axiomatic.

    I think one of the next things you'll see baked into these systems will be means to prohibit credential sharing.

    However, competition is good. More choice and delivery options enabled by technological innovation makes for competition. The core issue of course, is that many people do not have choices. 



    zroger73
  • Reply 6 of 15
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 601member
     I have a feeling this will remain very fragmented for a long time...I don't see cable companies voluntarily putting their user data in another company's hands..ie.CurentC, Walmart Pay, and all the others...
  • Reply 7 of 15
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 601member
    And just to comment on the photo… Every single company is now advertising their products with the same layout started by Apple...products spaced out perfectly on a slant...it's really funny, even amazon was selling clothes under $10 and had the same layout. 
  • Reply 8 of 15
    This platform is like inventing a way to forward all your landline calls to your iPhone so you can have a landline and still have the freedom of mobile phone! It’s brilliant. /s
  • Reply 9 of 15
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,586member
    zroger73 said:
    When the dust settles and the transition is complete, we'll be paying as much or more for internet and live/on-demand programming than we ever did for a cable TV and internet subscription. The cable companies are already adapting to ensure they don't lose revenue. I'm already paying almost as much for internet alone as what I was paying for internet and television just a few years ago.
    Sounds like you may be overpaying for your internet. In my area you can get a year of 30 megabit service for $30/mo. 

    The people I know with cable tv spend well over 100 bucks. If you try to replace all that garbage with ala cart sure it will add up. But for those who realized they don’t need a hundred channels of shit to choose from and prefer netflix and seasonal HBO, and the occasional season pass, we save. Going on 15 years of cord cutting savings here.
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 10 of 15
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,288member
    As long as I can continue to use the TiVo “peanut” remote I’ll be a happy man. The TV remote is a torture device designed by someone who never uses it. Jony. 
    zroger73bluefire1
  • Reply 11 of 15
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    zroger73 said:
    When the dust settles and the transition is complete, we'll be paying as much or more for internet and live/on-demand programming than we ever did for a cable TV and internet subscription. The cable companies are already adapting to ensure they don't lose revenue. I'm already paying almost as much for internet alone as what I was paying for internet and television just a few years ago.
    Sounds like you may be overpaying for your internet. In my area you can get a year of 30 megabit service for $30/mo. 

    The people I know with cable tv spend well over 100 bucks. If you try to replace all that garbage with ala cart sure it will add up. But for those who realized they don’t need a hundred channels of shit to choose from and prefer netflix and seasonal HBO, and the occasional season pass, we save. Going on 15 years of cord cutting savings here.
    I pay $50/mo for ~30mps service in seattle from comcast. I had to commit to a year of it to get the "discount." I do have an alternative (centurylink) but i've had consistent, reliable operation of my paid-for and fully amortized cable modem, so I hesitate to switch for unknown savings. CL pushes their bundles hard, there's a lotta upselling, and for sure an initial investment of not only new equipment, but the hassles of "installation." 

    I am also fortunate to be able to get a plethora of HDTV OTA channels. That plus the options you recite gets me all I need or want, at much less cost that paying form the crap that is delivered from a cable TV provider. Riddence.
  • Reply 12 of 15
    zroger73zroger73 Posts: 722member
    zroger73 said:
    When the dust settles and the transition is complete, we'll be paying as much or more for internet and live/on-demand programming than we ever did for a cable TV and internet subscription. The cable companies are already adapting to ensure they don't lose revenue. I'm already paying almost as much for internet alone as what I was paying for internet and television just a few years ago.
    Sounds like you may be overpaying for your internet. In my area you can get a year of 30 megabit service for $30/mo. 

    The people I know with cable tv spend well over 100 bucks. If you try to replace all that garbage with ala cart sure it will add up. But for those who realized they don’t need a hundred channels of shit to choose from and prefer netflix and seasonal HBO, and the occasional season pass, we save. Going on 15 years of cord cutting savings here.
    "Overpay" means to pay more than what is due. Like many (most?) people, I have one only reasonable source of "broadband" internet access. For me, that's Suddenlink. I currently pay $74/mo. for unlimited, 100 Mbps internet. That's a promotional rate given to me by the customer retention department. The normal price is $90/mo. Their least expensive internet for existing customers is $69/mo. ($41/mo. for new customers) for 50 Mbps with a 250 GB monthly limit. 50 Mbps is more than adequate for my needs, but I easily exceed the 250 GB monthly limit.

    My other choices for internet access are:

    A couple of local/regional wireless providers that are VERY slow and even more expensive than Suddenlink.
    Satellite, such as Excede or HughesNet, which are slow, limited, and expensive.
    Dial-up. That was a waste of time to even type.
    Cellular-based Wi-Fi hot spot. Can you imagine how expensive this would get to use 250+ GB per month?

    So, I'm paying as little as I possibly can for internet that meets my needs without "overpaying".

    When I first moved in five years ago, I had internet, cable TV, and two TiVo boxes that I paid just over $110/mo. for. Five years later, I'm paying almost that much for internet alone. Adding cable TV and a couple of TiVo boxes back in would push that close to $200/mo.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 13 of 15
    [...] For cable companies, TiVo's Next-Gen Platform may be seen as a way to keep up with pure Internet TV providers, to stem subscriber losses from customers electing to "cut the cord." Offering a way to provide their service via an iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV alongside other devices may give potential cord cutters a reason to stay with their existing subscription. [...]
    Okay, as mentioned my comment above, I'm home watching the wind blow snow into the areas I've just shoveled (I go out every three hours, my dog loves the snow and the quiet and so goes nuts running around), so it seemed like time to once again research my TV options.

    I have "300/35" Mbps, that's the minimum tier I need to do my job, so it's a moot question -- I can't function with cheaper, I've tried. The next step up is "400/40" for $20 more, nice but probably not necessary.

    Here's what I currently pay monthly:
    • $90 for “Silver package” [includes HBO, Showtime]
    • $9 for “Sports package” [includes beIN Sports]
    • $4 for “Broadcast TV” surcharge
    • $7 for “Sports TV” surcharge
    • $2 for CableCARD rental
    • $65 for internet
    • $20 for phone
    • Netflix $11
    • Hulu w/o commercials $12

    = TOTAL $220

    NO CABLE I [Playstation Vue]

    • $75 for internet and phone
    • Netflix $11
    • Hulu w/o commercials $12
    • Playstation Vue Ultra $75 (includes HBO and Showtime)
    • [no beIN Sports]                                                    

    = TOTAL $173

    NO CABLE II [Hulu with Live TV]

    • $75 for internet and phone
    • Netflix $11
    • Hulu with Live TV $40 (includes Hulu w/ commercials) [Not sure if it will be available w/o commercials. Still in beta.]
    • HBO & Showtime $24
    • [no beIN Sports]

    = TOTAL $150

    NO CABLE III [Sling TV]

    • $75 for internet and phone
    • Sling TV Orange and Blue $40
    • Sling TV Sports Extra (includes beIN Sports) $10
    • Netflix $11
    • Hulu w/o commercials $12
    • HBO $15
    • Showtime $10

    = TOTAL $173

    The savings is enough that we will probably do this, and soon. If Apple and/or TiVo catch up, then we will change.

    Interesting how, for our needs, Playstation Vue and Sling TV come out exactly the same. Hulu seems to offer the best value going forward, but beIN Sports is a plus, as my aforementioned wife is a La Liga fan, so I think maybe Sling TV is slightly ahead at this point.

    I should probably have looked into Amazon, but didn't.

    The weirdest thing is my internet and phone costs would actually go down by $10.

    EDIT: I suppose the next thing is to try to learn which of these functions the best -- has the least problems, most useful features, best UI, and so on. Since the price is not that different for mostly the same content, that's really the difference-maker...
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 14 of 15
    A few more thoughts on this, as a note to myself. 

    The biggest single loss of function will be the loss of our high-capacity TiVo DVR -- I have things that have been sitting on there for a very long time, for various reasons -- in looking at competing services, how they handle cloud-based DVR (if at all) is important.

    Another factor in the cost savings has been mentioned by others above, the ability to use, say, HBO or Showtime or Hulu "seasonally" -- shut them down for part of the year while waiting for desired original content. So that would argue for keeping them separate via iTunes and Apple TV, rather than tying them to an internet TV package. I think eventually this practice will lead to HBO et al. offering discounts if you buy an annual subscription rather than monthly, but so far, to my knowledge, that hasn't happened.
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 15 of 15
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    A few more thoughts on this, as a note to myself. 

    The biggest single loss of function will be the loss of our high-capacity TiVo DVR -- I have things that have been sitting on there for a very long time, for various reasons -- in looking at competing services, how they handle cloud-based DVR (if at all) is important.

    Another factor in the cost savings has been mentioned by others above, the ability to use, say, HBO or Showtime or Hulu "seasonally" -- shut them down for part of the year while waiting for desired original content. So that would argue for keeping them separate via iTunes and Apple TV, rather than tying them to an internet TV package. I think eventually this practice will lead to HBO et al. offering discounts if you buy an annual subscription rather than monthly, but so far, to my knowledge, that hasn't happened.
    The seasonal pass is something I use too. But interestingly, I've also discovered that my local public library has a really great website, good service, and stocks a lot of content on DVD for free...and they have a robust "hold" system. Free is a good price. and great for binge watching.

    iTunes sells "season passes" for TV shows, but they seem awfully expensive. $25 or so. If you could serially rent episodes for like $5 for a season, it might be tenable. Maybe.

    I'd also be interested in live streaming sports on a game by game basis. I might spring for a $.99 single NHL or NFL game. Not gonna happen though. Unless, of course, someone gets the ability to deliver that...and customize the commercial content the leagues build into their TV time outs. 
    edited January 2018
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