Apple partners with Malala Fund to provide educational opportunities to more girls in deve...

Posted:
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Apple has pledged support to the Malala Fund, the organization led by Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai, with the assistance expected to increase the Fund's impact in providing education to girls living in developing countries, including new programs in India and Latin America.




Founded by Malala Yousafzai and Ziauddin, her father, the Malala Fund aims to champion every girl's right to an education for 12 years, one that is both safe and free to attend. The Malala Fund has been in operation since 2013, working with other organizations, private companies, and governments to help provide educational opportunities, with the Fund's own Gulmakai Network supporting programs in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Nigeria.

By supporting the fund, Apple's assistance is expected to help double the number of grants provided by the Gulmakai Network, as well as extending the funding programs to India and Latin America. The initial goal is to extend secondary education opportunities to more than 100,000 girls.

Apple will also help the organization to scale up, assisting with technology, curriculum, and research into policy changes needed to help girls attend school and complete their education, wherever they are located. Apple CEO Tim Cook will also take a seat on the Malala Fund leadership council.

"My dream is for every girl to choose her own future," said Malala Yousafzai. "Through both their innovations and philanthropy, Apple has helped educate and empower people around the world. I am grateful that Apple knows the value of investing in girls and is joining Malala Fund in the fight to ensure all girls can learn and lead without fear."

In a statement, Cook advised "We believe that education is a great equalizing force, and we share Malala Fund's commitment to give every girl and opportunity to go to school." On Malala herself, Cook called her a "courageous advocate for equality and one of the most inspiring figures of our time."

Malala became known around the world following an attempted assassination by the Taliban in 2012, in response to her advocacy of increased access to education for girls in Pakistan. Aged 15 at the time, a gunman's attack on Malala was condemned by world leaders, with the outpouring of support also helping raise awareness and support for her educational work.

Current global estimates suggest there are approximately 130 million girls not enrolled in any educational program.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,343member
    Does Tim Cook have the mutant ability to teleport?

    StrangeDays
  • Reply 2 of 16
    kestralkestral Posts: 202member
    He has the same mutant ability as Batman: he's rich.
    chiaRayz2016bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 3 of 16
    mike54mike54 Posts: 264member
    A reasonably priced headless mac would help your company and them. So why ignore the mac mini for so long.

  • Reply 4 of 16
    This is really great. Nice work, Apple and Cook. 
    anome
  • Reply 5 of 16
    mike54 said:
    A reasonably priced headless mac would help your company and them. So why ignore the mac mini for so long.
    Oh jesus christ.
    chia
  • Reply 6 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,755member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Does Tim Cook have the mutant ability to teleport?

    Private jet, no layovers, no airport delays, no airline delays, no fuel rationing, edible food, etc., makes for much more efficient and effective use of his travel time. But the bummer side of the story is that he doesn't get any frequent flier miles. 

    It's really good to see Tim Cook continuing to build his portfolio of philanthropic and humanitarian causes. At some point these will become his primary focus and the day to day running of Apple will be handed off to someone else. The only question is - how soon? Life is short.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    chiachia Posts: 687member
    mike54 said:
    A reasonably priced headless mac would help your company and them. So why ignore the mac mini for so long.

    You've made quite a tenuous link to the article in expressing a potentially off-topic view about what products Apple should market.  I do hope you've read the recently revised commenting guidelines.

    Nevertheless, I shall give you the benefit of the doubt in disagreeing with you as to what is useful for education in the developing countries cited.
    Many of the developing countries have unreliable electricity grids, or a grid that is to geographically or economically out of reach for those in rural areas or the depths of poverty.  Instead of buying a Mac Mini that'll just sit in a corner doing nothing but look pretty without electricity, use the money to buy an iPad.
    The iPad in the developing world has numerous advantages over the Mac Mini setup:

    1. Cheaper, all in one design that can be used straight away without extra cost and complication of monitor, keyboard etc.
    2. Portable so can be shared across different people or even different communities.
    3. Built in cellular data so easier connection with internet.
    4. Battery powered so can be used when the power goes off and where there is no power
    5. Portable so it can be taken to where the power is to be recharged
    6. Relatively small power required compared to desktop thus can be charged from small, inexpensive solar panels

    An iPad offers at least the total utility of an iPhone with the bonus of a large screen comparable to that of a small laptop.
    The iPad can definitely do all the basics that most desktops still do now: document writing, emails, browsing the web etc.
    Furthermore the iPad is capable of image processing and even 1080p HD movie editing with iMovie.
    Wakaliwood is a good example of what people can achieve with even very limited resource.

    Most people in the developed world don't make use of the applications which require the complexity of a "desktop" Mac: most of them don't code, carry out complex CAD, create broadcast quality 4K content or use other apps which tax processing capability.  Hence, when seen from that context the idea, that a "headless Mac" would help those in the developing world struggling to maintain basic food, water, shelter and energy in addition to accessing education is ludicrous.  "On the ground", an iPad is the more pragmatic solution for aiding with education and information sharing.  As with the "developed world", there will be a path for those in the "developing world" with the talent and need to use the more "complex desktop machines"; I strongly suspect the proportion who fit into this category is even smaller than that in the developed world.

    Malala is a remarkable young woman.  I will go as far as to say that she is as an inspiration to Tim Cook.  She is a wonderful example of how precious we all are as human beings and an example of how important education is for all of us upon Planet Earth, wherever and whomever we may be.
    edited January 22 StrangeDayszoetmbmontrosemacsjony0
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,343member
    dewme said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Does Tim Cook have the mutant ability to teleport?

    Private jet, no layovers, no airport delays, no airline delays, no fuel rationing, edible food, etc., makes for much more efficient and effective use of his travel time. But the bummer side of the story is that he doesn't get any frequent flier miles. 

    It's really good to see Tim Cook continuing to build his portfolio of philanthropic and humanitarian causes. At some point these will become his primary focus and the day to day running of Apple will be handed off to someone else. The only question is - how soon? Life is short.
    He’s the CEO, so the day to day running of Apple is already being handled by other people. Cook sees the philanthropy as part of Apple’s strategy, and is good publicity for the company in light of its recent missteps. 
    edited January 22 chiaStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 9 of 16
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,319member
    It's a fund I'd not heard of until today but it's apparently been at work for some time, attracting support from a number of well-known companies from media to big tech to individuals and foundations (for instance JJ Abrams is one of the donors). IMO it seems like a wonderful group filling a great need, and operating as a well-organized outreach, so hat's off to Malala Yousafzai and the hard work she's put in to bringing so many resources together. How amazing that she started speaking out for girls at the age of 11 and by 15 her Malala Fund was already taking shape. Wow...
    https://www.malala.org/girls-education
    https://www.malala.org/donors

    edited January 22 singularitymontrosemacsjony0
  • Reply 10 of 16
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,341member
    chia said:

    The iPad in the developing world has numerous advantages over the Mac Mini setup:

    All true, but the iPad is still far too expensive a device for the developing world.   What would be great is if Apple made a much lower cost model (or made one of the older models available at lower cost) for the developing world and also developed a solar power supply for it.    
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Another worthwhile cause supported by Apple. Good to see Cook carrying on with the ethos of Apple isn't just about the bottom line. Companies can enrich the world as well making profits.
    StrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 12 of 16
    chiachia Posts: 687member
    zoetmb said:
    chia said:

    The iPad in the developing world has numerous advantages over the Mac Mini setup:

    All true, but the iPad is still far too expensive a device for the developing world.   What would be great is if Apple made a much lower cost model (or made one of the older models available at lower cost) for the developing world and also developed a solar power supply for it.    

    I do not follow, can you elaborate as to what the iPad is too expensive to in comparison to what device for the developing world?
    There's also no need for a specific solar power supply for it: there are plenty of appropriate solar power solutions readily available.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 13 of 16
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,319member
    chia said:
    zoetmb said:
    chia said:

    The iPad in the developing world has numerous advantages over the Mac Mini setup:

    All true, but the iPad is still far too expensive a device for the developing world.   What would be great is if Apple made a much lower cost model (or made one of the older models available at lower cost) for the developing world and also developed a solar power supply for it.    

    I do not follow, can you elaborate as to what the iPad is too expensive to in comparison to what device for the developing world?

    Similar to relatively inexpensive devices used in American schools. In that market Chromebooks have become the go-to. 
  • Reply 14 of 16
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,698member
    gatorguy said:
    It's a fund I'd not heard of until today but it's apparently been at work for some time, attracting support from a number of well-known companies from media to big tech to individuals and foundations (for instance JJ Abrams is one of the donors). IMO it seems like a wonderful group filling a great need, and operating as a well-organized outreach, so hat's off to Malala Yousafzai and the hard work she's put in to bringing so many resources together. How amazing that she started speaking out for girls at the age of 11 and by 15 her Malala Fund was already taking shape. Wow...
    https://www.malala.org/girls-education
    https://www.malala.org/donors

    I don't think there's any other form of charitable giving that can have as high an impact per $ spent. Another excellent charity working in this area is camfed. I didn't find info for what malala's fund overhead is like, but over 90% of funds raised by camfed goes directly to their education programs. This is a much higher percentage than most "mainstream" charities.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,755member
    Rayz2016 said:
    dewme said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Does Tim Cook have the mutant ability to teleport?

    Private jet, no layovers, no airport delays, no airline delays, no fuel rationing, edible food, etc., makes for much more efficient and effective use of his travel time. But the bummer side of the story is that he doesn't get any frequent flier miles. 

    It's really good to see Tim Cook continuing to build his portfolio of philanthropic and humanitarian causes. At some point these will become his primary focus and the day to day running of Apple will be handed off to someone else. The only question is - how soon? Life is short.
    He’s the CEO, so the day to day running of Apple is already being handled by other people. Cook sees the philanthropy as part of Apple’s strategy, and is good publicity for the company in light of its recent missteps. 
    Yeah, I know that. Tim has a staff of SVPs and their direct reports and underlings who run the mind bending day to day stuff. As CEO Tim has day to day CEO things that get him hands-on at the CEO level, including implicitly setting the high water mark on the cultural standards of the organization. Few CEOs anywhere do a better job in that regard. Tim Cook has all the money he'll ever need in life and then some. This is a near infinite resource for him but I don't believe that is what drives him at all. He obviously derives a great sense of satisfaction in making a hugely positive impact on so many people's lives, especially those who work for/with Apple. What Tim doesn't have an infinite source of is time. So what I'm talking more about a Bill Gates style transition to nearly full-time humanitarian and philanthropic causes that are near and dear to him. Sure he can continue to influence positive change from within Apple, but Apple is a great organization that is well endowed with a sense of purpose, direction, leadership, and people who make things happen at all levels. Many of the causes outside of Apple that Tim supports don't have these attributes with the same abundance that Apple has. It's up to Tim to decide how he can be most fulfilled, but I don't think Tim's time with Apple will be the pinnacle of his life's achievements, much like Bill Gates, Jimmy Carter, and others who have gone on to great second, third, or beyond "careers."
  • Reply 16 of 16
    chia said:
    mike54 said:
    A reasonably priced headless mac would help your company and them. So why ignore the mac mini for so long.

    You've made quite a tenuous link to the article in expressing a potentially off-topic view about what products Apple should market.  I do hope you've read the recently revised commenting guidelines.

    Nevertheless, I shall give you the benefit of the doubt in disagreeing with you as to what is useful for education in the developing countries cited.
    Many of the developing countries have unreliable electricity grids, or a grid that is to geographically or economically out of reach for those in rural areas or the depths of poverty.  Instead of buying a Mac Mini that'll just sit in a corner doing nothing but look pretty without electricity, use the money to buy an iPad.
    The iPad in the developing world has numerous advantages over the Mac Mini setup:

    1. Cheaper, all in one design that can be used straight away without extra cost and complication of monitor, keyboard etc.
    2. Portable so can be shared across different people or even different communities.
    3. Built in cellular data so easier connection with internet.
    4. Battery powered so can be used when the power goes off and where there is no power
    5. Portable so it can be taken to where the power is to be recharged
    6. Relatively small power required compared to desktop thus can be charged from small, inexpensive solar panels

    An iPad offers at least the total utility of an iPhone with the bonus of a large screen comparable to that of a small laptop.
    The iPad can definitely do all the basics that most desktops still do now: document writing, emails, browsing the web etc.
    Furthermore the iPad is capable of image processing and even 1080p HD movie editing with iMovie.
    Wakaliwood is a good example of what people can achieve with even very limited resource.

    Most people in the developed world don't make use of the applications which require the complexity of a "desktop" Mac: most of them don't code, carry out complex CAD, create broadcast quality 4K content or use other apps which tax processing capability.  Hence, when seen from that context the idea, that a "headless Mac" would help those in the developing world struggling to maintain basic food, water, shelter and energy in addition to accessing education is ludicrous.  "On the ground", an iPad is the more pragmatic solution for aiding with education and information sharing.  As with the "developed world", there will be a path for those in the "developing world" with the talent and need to use the more "complex desktop machines"; I strongly suspect the proportion who fit into this category is even smaller than that in the developed world.

    Malala is a remarkable young woman.  I will go as far as to say that she is as an inspiration to Tim Cook.  She is a wonderful example of how precious we all are as human beings and an example of how important education is for all of us upon Planet Earth, wherever and whomever we may be.


    I liked this response.


    But I liked this better:


    mike54 said:
    A reasonably priced headless mac would help your company and them. So why ignore the mac mini for so long.
    Oh jesus christ.


    MacPro
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