Growing glass crack appears at Michigan Ave. Apple store in Chicago

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2018
A large crack recently appeared in one of the windows at Apple's Michigan Avenue store, and has not only gone unfixed but actually gotten bigger, photos show.

Image Credit: 9to5Mac
Image Credit: 9to5Mac


The crack -- spanning multiple feet -- has reportedly been present for several weeks. A new photo reveals that the crack is branching out, 9to5Mac observed on Monday.

The damage is unlikely to affect the structural integrity of the building, but could pose a safety hazard to shoppers or passersby if the glass shatters.

Apple has been keen to highlight the unusual design of Michigan Avenue, but the outlet became a subject of criticism early on when the company had to rope off surrounding areas to deal with falling ice and snow -- a problem any building in Chicago should be equipped for. A spokesman blamed the issue on a malfunctioning warming system, and said the system was quickly reprogrammed.

Despite this, heating issues continue, 9to5Mac claims. When it works the system should melt ice and snow, allowing runoff to drain through internal support columns.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    bb-15bb-15 Posts: 265member
    It is Apple's fate to be held to a different standard compared with other tech companies and in this case other retail store companies. 
    Around the US and the world some shopping malls have structural problems. Some are in the process of being closed down with buildings / store fronts in disrepair.
    During harsh winters the problem of falling ice is common with buildings in cities which experience such cold weather.

    It's interesting how there is a vast audience for architecture news with stories which trash Apple for window cracks and the potential for falling ice.  
    edited February 2018 jony0ronnStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 34
    Probably just Sir Jony Ive pushing design to new levels!  Soon, all Iphones will come with an aesthetic crack which will then be copied by Android manufacturers!
    macky the mackybaconstang
  • Reply 3 of 34
    smalmsmalm Posts: 656member
    The damage is unlikely to affect the structural integrity of the building, but could pose a safety hazard to shoppers or passersby if the glass shatters.
    That's laminated glass. In all likelihood it will not shatter.
    But it's interesting that it cracked at all. The roof seems to apply an uneven load to the glass sheets.
    If true it won't help to just exchange the glass, the next one would crack as well...
    ronnlkruppwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 34
    dachardachar Posts: 330member
    If the building structure relies on the roof heating to deal with ice and snow, and then the system failed, will the structural components be designed to take the additional load without any consequences ?

    Glass curtain walling would not normally be part of the structural integrity of the building. I have no knowledge of how much glass like this expands and contracts or how flexible the expansion joints could be. The Architects and Structural Engineers should have taken this all into consideration when designing the building.

    If everything is properly designed and the loss of the roof heating was not critical then it might be an issue with just one glass window. If it is not a one off then that is possibly more significant and could required alterations to the design. 
  • Reply 5 of 34
    Slow news day?  ;)
    randominternetpersonmac_dogpscooter63ronndjames4242fruitstandninjawatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 34
    Slow news day?  ;)
    Let's see if this makes it to the evening news.

    Next week:  "Someone spilled a milkshake near the iPhone cases in a Miami Apple store and it still haven't been mopped up!"
    SpamSandwichStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 34
    The first person to call this "Glassgate" is gonna get a swift kick in the...er...glass.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 34
    Slow news day?  ;)
    Apparently so. I’m sure Business Insider will contact architectural experts to explain the flaw in Foster & Partner’s design.
    jony0randominternetpersonmacxpressStrangeDayscornchip
  • Reply 9 of 34
    I would assume that this cannot be repaired on site. I am also confident that these panels are 100% custom and not in stock at Lowes. Probably just lead time to get replacement panel in and then pane properly replaced...thoughts?
    zroger73pscooter63bsimpsenandrewj5790ronnwlymrandominternetpersonwatto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 10 of 34
    I would assume that this cannot be repaired on site. I am also confident that these panels are 100% custom and not in stock at Lowes. Probably just lead time to get replacement panel in and then pane properly replaced...thoughts?
    “Apple has all the money in the world, therefore they should be have been able to hire a team of warlocks to conjure unbreakable glass to replace the panel within 5 minutes of the crack appearing. They are evil and greedy however, so this new magical tech will be withheld from the next iPhone.” 

    sincerely,
    macrumors/9to5Mac comment section

    /s
    edited February 2018 wlymrandominternetpersonStrangeDayswatto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 11 of 34
    I walk my dog by the new Apple Store. This crack has been there at least two weeks, if not three. I hate to say it, but the property and building doesn't seem to be handling a relatively mild Chicago winter very well. I hate to see what happens during a harsh winter season.
  • Reply 12 of 34
    I walk my dog by the new Apple Store. This crack has been there at least two weeks, if not three. I hate to say it, but the property and building doesn't seem to be handling a relatively mild Chicago winter very well. I hate to see what happens during a harsh winter season.
  • Reply 13 of 34
    I would assume that this cannot be repaired on site. I am also confident that these panels are 100% custom and not in stock at Lowes. Probably just lead time to get replacement panel in and then pane properly replaced...thoughts?
    I imagine it's as you say. The replacement panel might well have been ordered the moment the crack appeared and will be replaced the moment the replacement arrives.

    My wife and I have had two homes built over the last 30 years. In both of them, tempered glass skylights and/or doors glass have spontaneously broken, usually shortly after construction/move-in, on sunny days. The temperature stress, coupled with flaws in the tempered glass, was enough to trigger the crack. When I was in college, the new engineering school lost a few tempered glass windows for exactly the same reasons. This is not unusual, nor is the general public's ignorance of expected minor failures in new structures.
    edited February 2018 ronnrandominternetpersonStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 34
    I told them not to throw stones!
    gatorguyStrangeDays
  • Reply 15 of 34
    sandorsandor Posts: 541member
    I would assume that this cannot be repaired on site. I am also confident that these panels are 100% custom and not in stock at Lowes. Probably just lead time to get replacement panel in and then pane properly replaced...thoughts?

    definitely the case.

    all commercial glass is "custom" (ie you cannot cut this glass down to size, it is always manufactured to the specific dimensions.)
    so they are waiting for the replacement.

    probably also some argument as to who is paying for it as well.
    eating that one piece could be a large chunk of the glazier's profits.

    was the glass smacked by another trade? was it an edge defect? and installation issue? did someone pop the trim off & put it back on wrong?

    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 34
    sandorsandor Posts: 541member
    smalm said:
    The damage is unlikely to affect the structural integrity of the building, but could pose a safety hazard to shoppers or passersby if the glass shatters.
    That's laminated glass. In all likelihood it will not shatter.
    But it's interesting that it cracked at all. The roof seems to apply an uneven load to the glass sheets.
    If true it won't help to just exchange the glass, the next one would crack as well...
    but laminated glass can still fragment & fall.
    a 5 pound V of glass can cause a lot of arterial damage from 8 feet up.

    if it really is above a door, i am shocked more hasn't been done to secure it.
  • Reply 17 of 34
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 357member
    No doubt under warranty so the manufacturer is making and shipping a new pane. That’s from Europe iirc. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 34
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,123member
    BubbaTwo said:
    Probably just Sir Jony Ive pushing design to new levels!  Soon, all Iphones will come with an aesthetic crack which will then be copied by Android manufacturers!
    I will be called the Plumber's Special Red Edition.
  • Reply 19 of 34
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,420member
    The glass panel is likely from Sedak/Seele, the German glass manufacturer who has provided glass panels for many Apple retail stores as well as the glass panels at Apple Park.

    As mentioned by Sandor, all of these panels are custom made for Apple, they aren't standard windows that one buys at Home Depot or Lowe's.
    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 34
    lukeilukei Posts: 332member
    dachar said:
    If the building structure relies on the roof heating to deal with ice and snow, and then the system failed, will the structural components be designed to take the additional load without any consequences ?

    Glass curtain walling would not normally be part of the structural integrity of the building. I have no knowledge of how much glass like this expands and contracts or how flexible the expansion joints could be. The Architects and Structural Engineers should have taken this all into consideration when designing the building.

    If everything is properly designed and the loss of the roof heating was not critical then it might be an issue with just one glass window. If it is not a one off then that is possibly more significant and could required alterations to the design. 
    Thanks Sherlock /s
    watto_cobra
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