Who does Apple's Marketing?

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Does anyone know how to contact Apple's marketing team? I've got a new idea on the switchover campaign that they may be interested in pursuing. Thanks in advance.



Mark

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    [quote]Originally posted by Airweasel45:

    <strong>Does anyone know how to contact Apple's marketing team? I've got a new idea on the switchover campaign that they may be interested in pursuing. Thanks in advance.



    Mark</strong><hr></blockquote>



    <a href="http://www.apple.com/pr/bios/schiller.html"; target="_blank">Phil Schiller</a>: VP, Worldwide Product Marketing



    Apple's Switch: <a href="http://www.apple.com/switch/tell/us.html"; target="_blank">Tell Us</a> Page



    Apple's <a href="http://www.apple.com/contact/"; target="_blank">Contact</a> Page



    HTH.



    - Johnny Dangerously
  • Reply 2 of 11
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    You can always try the backdoor approach, and contact Lee CLow at TWBA Chiat/Day or Errol Morris.
  • Reply 3 of 11
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    Marketsource.com is another one i know they use. they hire for Demo Days and the like.
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Phil Schiller is the person to contact. The others are involed in Advertising and Promotions, not really marketing. However, no company will accept outside ideas except if it comes from hired third partes. Too many pitfalls and potential legal problems. You need to be working for the company or Chiat/Day et al , then your ideas will be considered. That's the way it is I'm afraid.



    [ 12-13-2002: Message edited by: MacsRGood4U ]</p>
  • Reply 5 of 11
    So, basically, no ideas will even be considered if they don't come from a hired third party? So how can innovation happen if the market for ideas isn't open?
  • Reply 6 of 11
    The other way to look at it is how can innovation happen when someone suggests an idea that you use only to find it accompanied by a lawsuit requesting compensation after aired?



    On Apple's site looking for OS X feedback, if you read the fine print, there was a clause stating that anything you submit as feedback becomes the immediate property of Apple, etceteras...



    Why that couldn't be implemented for this I don't know, I'm not really savvy on this whole thing...



    But it's probably also an ego thing. If there is one thing I've learned in art school, it is to leave your ego at the door. If you bring it with you to critiques, they're just going to rip it off you, toss it on the floor, step on it, drench it in gasoline, light it on fire, step on it some more, and probably repeat a few times.



    But some people don't lose their fragile egos and don't really like taking suggestions from outsiders. I mean, were you qualified to suggest anything to them, you would be a member of their marketing team. But since you're not, you're obviously not qualified and not worth wasting time on (read: Our fragile egos couldn't handle the thought of a snot-nose little brat like you offering whatever comes out of your puny little brain)



    The way things work. Should they work that way? Maybe not. Is it worth fighting to change? No. Life's about picking your battles...
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Good points-and well stated, too. I murdered my ego long ago, but it died a gruesome death full of pleadings for mercy. I guess theres no point bitching about the way things are if I haven't even tried to contact them yet. "We shall see", said the blind man to his deaf child.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    der kopfder kopf Posts: 2,275member
    [quote]Originally posted by M3D Jack:

    <strong>If there is one thing I've learned in art school, it is to leave your ego at the door. If you bring it with you to critiques, they're just going to rip it off you, toss it on the floor, step on it, drench it in gasoline, light it on fire, step on it some more, and probably repeat a few times.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Would you mind then if I ask you this personal question: how does one put one's ego at the door? I ask you this in a serious way, because I feel the truth of what you say, and have tried to not take things personal, but have not succeeded 100%. Is there a trick you tend to use? Some mind-spiel?
  • Reply 9 of 11
    I think an inventors trick might help here.



    Write your idea down and post it to apple. Also post an IDENTICAL package to yourself via recorded mail and do not open it. So it is date stamped the same as the other one.



    If any problems arise, you can open your copy infront of legal witnesses to prove it was your idea.



    If on the otherhand just seeing your idea is enough credit for yourself then just use the std feedback chans and tell them your idea.



    [ 12-18-2002: Message edited by: Gargoyle ]</p>
  • Reply 10 of 11
    [quote]Originally posted by der Kopf:

    <strong>



    Would you mind then if I ask you this personal question: how does one put one's ego at the door? I ask you this in a serious way, because I feel the truth of what you say, and have tried to not take things personal, but have not succeeded 100%. Is there a trick you tend to use? Some mind-spiel?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Well, I think you need to be willing to accept the fact that you're not always right When someone criticizes me, I have to discipline myself to take it as if I am wrong and this person is right... at least at the time it is happening. People tend not to do things out of thin air and for no reason whatsoever, and when someone critiques you, it isn't just for the hell of it. This is obviously something this person has noticed, and in their minds, it is 'a truth'. It is 'a truth' because it is their perception, and their perception is always true to them, as is mine, and I respect that. Just like when you anger somebody, and you think that they are unjust in being upset at you for whatever reason. I stand back, and attempt to accept the fact that they are right and I am wrong. I ponder this, and attempt to learn from it; apply it to my life.



    I don't always walk away believing that they are right and I am wrong, but what I do consistently benefit from is seeing life through a different set of eyes. This has been beneficial to the point where I feel honored at times for someone to share their perception of life with me. People will say it doesn't matter what other people think, and I'd say that's a depressingly conceited way to look at life. It's all about what other people think of you. But that should not justify your actions, there is a line here. You should digest what people say, and see how it goes. Really go over it all with yourself. Because there is a reason someone is criticizing you, and it is obviously important enough to them to be telling you. So respect that, it's common courtesy.



    Don't turn into a doormat though, you need to maintain a backbone of some sort. Consider it... like the art of diplomacy



    There isn't really any good way to do it. It's like anything else... staying healthy, getting up on time: You have to force yourself to do it, but once you start and realize how beneficial it can be, you don't want to stop. Nothing is ever easy or free
  • Reply 11 of 11
    [quote]Originally posted by Gargoyle:

    <strong>I think an inventors trick might help here.



    Write your idea down and post it to apple. Also post an IDENTICAL package to yourself via recorded mail and do not open it. So it is date stamped the same as the other one.



    If any problems arise, you can open your copy infront of legal witnesses to prove it was your idea.



    If on the otherhand just seeing your idea is enough credit for yourself then just use the std feedback chans and tell them your idea.



    [ 12-18-2002: Message edited by: Gargoyle ]</strong><hr></blockquote>



    This is exactly why Apple has a flat out policy refusing any outside info. They don't want your unsolicited ideas. And if you DO still send them something, they've openly stated that they take ownership of the idea. They might not try to prove they originated it; they'll just say that their policies allowed them to do what they wanted with an unsolicited idea.



    [ 12-19-2002: Message edited by: clonenode ]</p>
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