Apple halting new iTunes LP content as of April, pulling existing bundles [u]

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited March 2018
Apple will no longer accept any new iTunes LP content after March, and the company will in fact be removing existing content from the iTunes Store throughout 2018, a report indicated on Tuesday, which was later confirmed by the company.




"Apple will no longer accept new submissions of iTunes LPs after March 2018," Apple said in an email sent to music industry professionals, seen by Metro. "Existing LPs will be deprecated from the store during the remainder of 2018. Customers who have previously purchased an album containing an iTunes LP will still be able to download the additional content using iTunes Match."

iTunes LP was originally launched in 2009 as a way of making whole-album downloads more appealing, including the sort of extras sometimes bundled with vinyl records. Artists ranging from The Beatles and Taylor Swift through to downtempo electronic band Zero 7 have put out enhanced material.

As quickly as 2010, though, word emerged that the LP format wasn't having the desired effect. Allegedly it may not have been Apple's idea, but rather created as a way to placate the music industry, concerned about the tendency of people to buy individual songs -- typically just 99 cents at the time.

Since then Apple's music revenues have transitioned away from downloads in general, thanks to the 2015 launch of Apple Music. Rumors have sometimes swirled that the company will even abandon iTunes music downloads entirely in the next few years, but no concrete news has emerged. That might also risk upsetting record labels and artists, for whom downloads are far more profitable than the revenue sharing from streaming.

The Metro report suggests that the iTunes LP format possible demise is a sign of things to come, implying that Apple is intending to discontinue music sales on the service. However, there is nothing suggesting that is the case in the discontinuation of a nine-year-old bundling maneuver to try to get consumers to buy entire albums that never gained that much traction.

Update: Apple has confirmed that the iTunes LP format will not be accepted after March. Existing content will remain, and will still be purchasable and downloadable.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    Speaking as someone who frequently buys music through iTunes, and often entire albums: I've never purchased an "iTunes LP", and actually forgot that the concept even existed.
    randominternetpersonbaconstang
  • Reply 2 of 21
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 901member
    I'm totally unfamiliar with iTunes LP. Does it contain music with extras such as wow and flutter, pops, hiss, skips, scratches, pre and post echo, low dynamic range, variations in download quality, and progressively worse sound as you play the songs more and more? And automatically pauses halfway through?
    ihatescreennamesloquiturrandominternetpersonorthicon
  • Reply 3 of 21
    applericappleric Posts: 33member
    WOW! I actually have bought several albums because of the LP content. Same with why I buy movies with iTunes Extras, because it's a digital version of the physical release. So… are we going to see this happen in their movies too? And will we get reimbursed for the LP purchases? So, for example, here's Foster The People's iTunes LP (notice the Ping link? teehee)
    edited March 2018
  • Reply 4 of 21
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 239member
    Step 1: Destroy peoples iTunes Libraries
    Step 2: Make people dependent on iTunes downloads
    Step 3: Discontinue iTunes downloads - force people to Apple Music subscriptions
    Step 4: Vehemently defend class-action in court
    Step 5: ROFL at morons who stick with Apple as a music source



    baconstang
  • Reply 5 of 21
    78Bandit78Bandit Posts: 232member
    I haven't bought an entire album in years. In fact, the last complete album I purchased was on a physical CD. Since downloads have been available I'll just listen to the song samples and buy the one or two songs I like. I have bought some compilation albums, but in those cases I knew I liked a number of songs and the album purchase price was less than the cost of the individual songs. The days of paying for filler material are long gone for me. No amount of digital extras is going to get me to pay $15 for just a couple of songs I will listen to more than once.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 6 of 21
    stukestuke Posts: 83member
    I enjoy my Apple Music subscription to explore music genre. I also equally enjoy purchasing music (song or album), sometimes from new music heard from the AM subscription, but mostly from my past musical interests. I would be one person very disappointed with the removal of iTunes purchased music content.  Why the two can’t coexist is beyond me...they do today to my bliss. In fact, Apple’s iTunes model to legally purchase music was just to outlet I needed to stop searching for songs using Acquisition!  I prefer buying music...and gladly choose to do that using iTunes...so don’t stop that Apple!
  • Reply 7 of 21
    Lab4UsLab4Us Posts: 30member
    Prior to Apple Music, and even a year or so after, I generally always bought full albums.  I find I usually end up liking album content over the “singles” pushed by the industry.  A few of those came with the “LP”, but I can honestly say I never even opened and listened to any of the “LP”s.  Now I much prefer the $14.99 for Apple Music family and listening to whatever I want.  I estimate I save between $100-$200 a month.
    randominternetpersonlolliver
  • Reply 8 of 21
    I can count on one hand the number of albums where I liked all or even most of the tracks. Singles forever for me.
  • Reply 9 of 21
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 721member
    bitmod said:
    Step 1: Destroy peoples iTunes Libraries
    Step 2: Make people dependent on iTunes downloads
    Step 3: Discontinue iTunes downloads - force people to Apple Music subscriptions
    Step 4: Vehemently defend class-action in court
    Step 5: ROFL at morons who stick with Apple as a music source



    iTunes LP was originally launched in 2009 as a way of making whole-album downloads more appealing, including the sort of extras sometimes bundled with vinyl records. Artists ranging from The Beatles and Taylor Swift through to downtempo electronic band Zero 7 have put out enhanced material.

    So you have zero idea what iTunes LP was/is.
    eliangonzallollivergilly33GeorgeBMacjony0
  • Reply 10 of 21
    I have always loved the freedom to purchase by song. I am betting I miss out on some great songs by doing this though. I always remember hating having to buy full albums back in the day but that is also how I fell in love with some of my favorite artists music...now with the subscription model I can have best of both worlds...I can download the album and listen to it all without that impacting my pocket...pretty sweet actually. Once I have given it a listen I can then skim out the songs I am not feeling.
    randominternetpersonlolliverflashfan207
  • Reply 11 of 21
    I'm really getting tired of the music industry being in denial about the impact they're having on their customers.

    Albums were a way for the music industry to package more content from the musicians and sell it, whether it be less-successful music tracks or additional artwork and stories centered around the material.  iTunes LP was a way to take that additional content, with its additional sales volume, and bring it to the download industry.  The reality is that people don't want albums any more-- people aren't interested in the things the music industry wants to shovel at them and they have been in their death throes for a while.

    If they don't embrace the changes they are being forced to endure I don't have much hope for them-- much like I don't have much hope for the brick-and-mortar stores and the DVD purchase industry-- these are industries that are being made irrelevant quickly by modern technology and the adage "adapt or die" is becoming more and more appropriate.


    lollivergilly33
  • Reply 12 of 21
    bitmod said:
    Step 1: Destroy peoples iTunes Libraries
    Step 2: Make people dependent on iTunes downloads
    Step 3: Discontinue iTunes downloads - force people to Apple Music subscriptions
    Step 4: Vehemently defend class-action in court
    Step 5: ROFL at morons who stick with Apple as a music source



    Step 6. Ignore the trolls who "forget" that we can have AAC local copies of any music we've purchased from Apple.
    lollivergilly33
  • Reply 13 of 21
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,980member
    bitmod said:
    Step 1: Destroy peoples iTunes Libraries
    Step 2: Make people dependent on iTunes downloads
    Step 3: Discontinue iTunes downloads - force people to Apple Music subscriptions
    Step 4: Vehemently defend class-action in court
    Step 5: ROFL at morons who stick with Apple as a music source
    Step 6. Ignore the trolls who "forget" that we can have AAC local copies of any music we've purchased from Apple.
    Step 7: lament how many people seem to lack basic rationality & critical thinking skills, and consider the effects that has on the world.
  • Reply 14 of 21
    The reality is that people don't want albums any more-- people aren't interested in the things the music industry wants to shovel at them and they have been in their death throes for a while.

    If they don't embrace the changes they are being forced to endure I don't have much hope for them.


    Things college freshmen say. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 15 of 21
    I always opt for more options, not fewer.
  • Reply 16 of 21
    aegeanaegean Posts: 114member
    I don't buy music from iTunes due to lossy content, but I do have Apple Music subscription just to have some fun activity and explore some more artists though I have lots of other ways to explore and discover more music. But nowhere iTunes Store or Apple Music is my main mode of listening to/buying music. I am an audiophile and it's been 46 years now, I still love listening to LP records. There's absolutely no alternatives/substitute for me.
    edited March 2018
  • Reply 17 of 21
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,686member
    aegean said:
    I don't buy music from iTunes due to lossy content, but I do have Apple Music subscription just to have some fun activity and explore some more artists though I have lots of other ways to explore and discover more music. But nowhere iTunes Store or Apple Music is my main mode of listening to/buying music. I am an audiophile and it's been 46 years now, I still love listening to LP records. There's absolutely no alternatives/substitute for me.
    All my TV is on vinyl.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    appleric said:
    WOW! I actually have bought several albums because of the LP content. Same with why I buy movies with iTunes Extras, because it's a digital version of the physical release. So… are we going to see this happen in their movies too? And will we get reimbursed for the LP purchases? So, for example, here's Foster The People's iTunes LP (notice the Ping link? teehee)
    Oooooohhhhhhh, Torches is an awesome album!
  • Reply 19 of 21
    I have always loved the freedom to purchase by song. I am betting I miss out on some great songs by doing this though. I always remember hating having to buy full albums back in the day but that is also how I fell in love with some of my favorite artists music...now with the subscription model I can have best of both worlds...I can download the album and listen to it all without that impacting my pocket...pretty sweet actually. Once I have given it a listen I can then skim out the songs I am not feeling.
    I completely agree. The one thing I’m sitting here thinking though, and this comes from not truly understanding the music streaming/subscription model, is there a practice in place that gives the artist a certain amount of money every time their song is played, and then perhaps a little bit more when it’s downloaded or added to a playlist maybe? Obviously without a reward system in place for the creators, why would they continue creating? Anyway, not really trying to make a point, just tossin’ ideas around. 
  • Reply 20 of 21
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,298member
    I have always loved the freedom to purchase by song. I am betting I miss out on some great songs by doing this though. I always remember hating having to buy full albums back in the day but that is also how I fell in love with some of my favorite artists music...now with the subscription model I can have best of both worlds...I can download the album and listen to it all without that impacting my pocket...pretty sweet actually. Once I have given it a listen I can then skim out the songs I am not feeling.
    huh?
    "Back in the day" you had a choice between a 33 LP album collection or a single song (with a backside) on a "45".   Apple didn't invent anything new with the $.99 single...

    For myself, I always preferred the album.   Not because you got more songs.  But because, in most well thought out albums, there was a continuity and a connectedness between songs -- much like you experience at a concert.   They didn't/don't just throw random songs at you that were pulled out of a hat.   There's flow that links them together and makes the whole experience greater than the sum of its parts...

    And too, even going with single songs, one of the things we lost with Apple Music was to define your own genres (such as: "80's soft jazz") and assign individual songs to it.   Yes, you can create play lists, but they are a hastle and don't actually do the same...
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