Tim Cook speaks out on Cambridge Analytica debacle, calls for stricter consumer privacy sa...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2018
At the China Development Forum this weekend, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke about Facebook's misuse of customer data, and sounded the call for stricter rules across the board on what companies are allowed to do with harvested information.




First reported by Bloomberg on early Saturday morning, Cook was asked at a discussion about the Cambridge Analytica debacle, and if the use of consumer data should be dialed back as a result.

"I think that this certain situation is so dire and has become so large that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary," said Cook. "The ability of anyone to know what you've been browsing about for years, who your contacts are, who their contacts are, things you like and dislike and every intimate detail of your life -- from my own point of view it shouldn't exist."

Cook noted that Apple had been aware of the possibility of misuse of consumer data for a long time.

"We've worried for a number of years that people in many countries were giving up data probably without knowing fully what they were doing and that these detailed profiles that were being built of them," added Cook. "That one day, something would occur and people would be incredibly offended by what had been done without them being aware of it. Unfortunately that prediction has come true more than once."

Cook has notably in the past obliquely referred to companies' use of consumer data, noting that if a product was free, then the consumer -- and all associated data -- was the product paying for the service.

The FTC is probing Facebook following the revelation that the UK-based Cambridge Analytica acquired the data of as many as 50 million Facebook users, reports Bloomberg, which may have been misused to influence a number of political events world-wide.

In a post on March 21, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained that Aleksandr Kogan, the researcher at the center of the scandal, had accessed data of 300,000 Facebook users with permission when he created a personality quiz back in 2013. In doing so, the users who took the poll gave up information on millions of connections without their permission with an academic account, and not a commercial one.

Kogan shared that harvested data with Cambridge Analytica, with some debate over whether or not Cambridge Analytica deleted the data even after promising Facebook that it had done so.

In the wake of the revelations, Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica and parent company Strategic Communications Laboratories for violating the site's Terms of Service, specifically rules about the collection and retention of data.

Cook also spoke out in the wake of a series of hacks in 2014, and detailed Apple's stance on user data and privacy.

"Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products. We don't build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don't 'monetize' the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don't read your email or your messages to get information to market to you," Cook wrote in an open letter to customers. "Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple."
brakken
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,862administrator
    Yesterday was one of the heaviest moderated days for breaking the forum rules since we updated them.

    So, as a reminder, we didn't make this political, and neither will you. Read the commenting guidelines if you need clarification on it. If you want to know why we have the rules and enforce them, please feel free to shoot me a civil message, and we can talk.

    This is about Facebook, Cambridge Analytica's misuse of the data, and Cook's response.
    edited March 2018 williamlondonlongpathMartin57fotoformatmagman1979roundaboutnowking editor the gratewatto_cobrajSnivelyGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 64
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,370member
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    racerhomie3magman1979viclauyycdewmewatto_cobraanton zuykovbaconstanganantksundaramjony0
  • Reply 3 of 64
    FB doesn’t sell great products to consumers, it sells consumers’ data to corporate entities. So it would seem any regulations on that would more or less impede FB’s business model. It’s about time, I say. I don’t think FB is heading towards total transparency anytime soon.
    williamlondonericthehalfbeemagman1979mattinozwatto_cobrabaconstanganantksundaramStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 4 of 64
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,684member
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 
    edited March 2018 irelandmuthuk_vanalingamKopfschmerzen
  • Reply 5 of 64
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,065member
    I agree that legislation is the way. However, it has to be good legislation with clearly defined goals.
    baconstang
  • Reply 6 of 64
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    williamlondonracerhomie3propodMartin57steven n.magman1979bshankrandominternetpersonwatto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 7 of 64
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    VAVOOM, Eric! I strictly avoid Goophabet and FB and use Better (by indie) tracker blocker on all my Apple devices.
    racerhomie3williamlondonmagman1979watto_cobrabaconstangboogerman2000
  • Reply 8 of 64
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    An interesting article on Jacobin here about this latest data hoovering brouhaha, I felt it should nicely complement all the apologism being spattered about like shit thrown against a wall by certain pro-Google partisans.
    steven n.magman1979watto_cobrabaconstangStrangeDays
  • Reply 9 of 64
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,684member
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    Sum of all of them pales in comparison to Google? Have you ever bothered to look at what Google thinks they know about you? Probably not IMHO but you can anytime it tickles your fancy. Then you don't have to make stuff up, you can base it on actual knowledge.

    Instead it looks to me like you prefer the lazy (or is it disingenuous) route to FUD-rush, that an evil Google with evil intent factually knows more about your personal life than Experion, or Acxiom, or TransUnion, or a hundred other data aggregators who mine, partner, and outright pay for access to everything from your sexual and religious bent, to your psychological and medical conditions, to the layout of your home and your neighbors homes, to the demographics of your entire extended family and more? They aren't in it to place an ad based on anonymised baskets of web visitors like Google is. They're in it to sell pure data, your TV and on-line viewing habits, your banking and employment and income, where you go, what you do, what you eat... Just selling your personal data for any purpose the buyer wishes to use it for.

     Facebook? I'm not sure what they know or the extent of it, that's one I need to pull my data profile from before claiming anything based on any actual knowledge of it. I would suspect they know far more personal verified information in general than Google considering how they collect it but I could be wrong.

     So before posting things that may or may not be true but you want to present as fact, why not do the forum a favor and look and when it's simply your opinion make it more clear? IMHO we all have far more to fear from the Acxiom's and Equifax's of the world than an online ad purveyor. Your minimizing the privacy danger isn't particularly helpful to a common consumers understanding, nor is inferring that Apple has entirely clean hands and if you just faithfully trust them then your world is safe from intrusions on your personal life. There is no privacy safe house anymore,  particularly so in a digital world.
    edited March 2018 singularityjony0
  • Reply 10 of 64
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,684member
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    An interesting article on Jacobin here about this latest data hoovering brouhaha, I felt it should nicely complement all the apologism being spattered about like shit thrown against a wall by certain pro-Google partisans.
    That author mentions not to trust Apple either. Still a good article as a general warning even if specifics might be sparse.  Unfortunately as long as we wish to be tax-paying consumers with jobs and families we cannot avoid being mined for our personal data. It's not online ads that scare me, it's what's being done with the information that everyone else around us from our favorite retailer to the driver's license agent is collecting and sharing for purposes unknown.and often undiscoverable. 
    edited March 2018 singularitymuthuk_vanalingamjony0
  • Reply 11 of 64
    sacto joesacto joe Posts: 664member
    It’s amazing to me that everyone is ignoring the elephant in the room; always-listening devices. These are the ultimate seductive and ultimate high risk-to-privacy devices made. Amazon is for some reason being given a huge pass on this, when it’s clear as day that the major reason Alexa is so much better than Siri is because every word you speak in Alexa’s presence is being spied on and tailored to your specifics.

    It gives me chills to think how willingly people are sticking their heads in potential nooses. Yes, there needs to be a debate about whether we can trust even Apple in this regard. But at least Apple has a track record of going to the wall to protect our privacy. I’d trust Amazon or Google on this no farther than I could throw President Trump.
    edited March 2018 tallest skilmagman1979watto_cobrakestralbaconstang
  • Reply 12 of 64
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,684member
    sacto joe said:
    It’s amazing to me that everyone is ignoring the elephant in the room; always-listening devices. These are the ultimate seductive and ultimate high risk-to-privacy devices made. Amazon is for some reason being given a huge pass on this, when it’s clear as day that the major reason Alexa is so much better than Siri is because every word you speak in Alexa’s presence is being spied on and tailored to your specifics.

    It literally gives me chills to think how willingly people are sticking their heads in potential nooses. Yes, there needs to be a debate about whether we can trust even Apple in this regard. But at least Apple has a track record of going to the wall to protect our privacy. I’d trust Amazon or Google on this no further than I could throw President Trump.
    Of the three only one lacks a physical microphone-off switch on their home assistant device so "listening" cannot happen.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 13 of 64
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,517member
    GoogleGuy working overtime. 

    😂

    williamlondonmagman1979bshankredhotfuzzcutykamuwatto_cobrabaconstangStrangeDays
  • Reply 14 of 64
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,432member
    Has anyone (else) downloaded their FB account history and looked at it?
  • Reply 15 of 64
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    The woman's argument on the podcast were rather week in absolving Facebook cause they did nothing to change things in the last few years.

    Many people don't quite understand those long mumbo jumbo TOS and FB's privacy default settings have been desigenious.

    Firms like FB knew CA  were breaking election laws in the US and in the UK, and did nothing about it basically.
    People may even agree to be sold goods with FB data, but trying to change or manipulating their political opinions is something people won't agree with
    (and that's were the issue is in this, the political aspect of the data use).

    In fact, they didn't seem to give a shit how the data was being used that's not really clear when people give access to FB.

    Are you really agreeing to all your friends being targetted tor psyops and opinion related messaging if you accept to use FB to log into Site X, not really, that's the issue.

    It's a lot harder than you say to establish what you're actually sharing and its use than you (and that woman) make it seem.

    And even her use of data and the like was pretty much first level (she even admitted that) and yet she did this grand pronouncement about FB!

    Why are companies like FB and Google, all lobbying for the EU and the like to not regulate them if indeed they've got nothing to feel sorry for?

    Avoiding FB, Google, Amazon is pretty hard though as your info might be with someone that's not you, people on FB may be taggng their photos, eventually your voice, etc
    Cross referencing public, private sources can extract tons of info that you don't even think you've given away..

    That's why you can't just leave this in the realm of "personal responsability", there needs to be heavy regulations of privacy aspects (probably already too late for many of our private info that are already in private hands). You're soul is already up for grabs and it's possible we'll never own ourselves ever again.
    magman1979propodbaconstangStrangeDays
  • Reply 16 of 64
    irelandireland Posts: 17,491member
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    I get what you’re saying, but two points. How Facebook has been bahaving re privacy the last few years I believe is immoral. And most users have no idea what Facebook is up to and doing with their data and Facebook has no intention of educating people on this. That’s inexcusable. I absolutely blame Zuckerberg and Facebook for this. Also, Facebook has become an engagement at all costs company and it’s horrible. They are choosing to run their operation like this. Zuckerberg is too wealthy to care. They have teams and doctors and scientists manipulating how people behave. The reality is very different from the story they like to tell. It’s easy for AI guys on the podcast to see things a certain way, but the average user isn’t educated enough to know what’s going on. Facebook should operate ethically and respect people.  
    edited March 2018 propodwatto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 17 of 64
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,432member
    ireland said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    I get what you’re saying, but two points. How Facebook has been bahaving re privacy the last few years I believe is immoral. And most users don’t understand what Facebook is up to Facebook has no intention of educating people on this. I absolutely blame Zuckerberg and Facebook for this. Also, Facebook has become an engagement at all costs company and it’s horrible. They are choosing to run their operation like this. Zuckerberg is too wealthy to care. They have teams and doctors and scientists manipulating how people behave. The reality is very different from the story they like to tell. 
    That’s a very different conversation than what CA did or FB not letting users know about the breach or their appalling security team. There were no Terms and Conditions agreed to by users that allowed for CA to steal your data. Hiring experts to find better ways to make you want to use FB is neither illegal nor immoral.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 18 of 64
    irelandireland Posts: 17,491member
    FB doesn’t sell great products to consumers, it sells consumers’ data to corporate entities. So it would seem any regulations on that would more or less impede FB’s business model. It’s about time, I say. I don’t think FB is heading towards total transparency anytime soon.
    They’ll only change what they have to to look good. Facebook clearly doesn’t give a shit about people. The last five to ten years says all we need to know about how Facebook and Zuckerberg feel about users. Why do you think they have to have a survey on Facebook to ask their users if they trust Facebook. They are insecure because they know they are untrustworthy and are asking users to convince themselves they care.

    What’s more, this political data fake news social network debacle was inevitable. It’s the first of many of this kind of major data blow up. Unless some clever and serious regulation is drawn up. Regulation + heavy legal and criminal penalty is the only solution at this juncture in human history. Perhaps in some decades our species can evolve out of such short sighted ways.
    edited March 2018 watto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 19 of 64
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 361member
    Great in theory. But Apple supported the CLOUD act that undercuts much of what Cook and Apple try to stand for. (See previous AppleInsider article.) A tad hypocritical.
    tallest skilmagman1979muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 20 of 64
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,081member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    maestro64 said:
    If you have not listen to the Apple insider pod cast on this subject, you should.

     Everyone wants too blame Facebook since it is easier to blame someone else, but most need to look no further than their own mirror. I never bought in to the Facebook thing and always felt it would be bad. I also valued my privacy over getting free things. 

    I learned a few things from the pod cast, basically anyone who is pissed off your own information may have been used against you, you have to remember you got something free and you gave facebook the right to use your information the way they like. They never had to ask you if it was okay to allow third parts to use your information, you gave up that right by creating that account.

    If you want to protect your information. Then stop using free stuff, and pay for your services.
    Paying for something doesn't make the "selling you" issue go away.

    Between retailers sharing your purchases, banks/credit card providers sharing your financial history, your cellular provider sharing your use data, the government sharing your driving, ownership, and legal history, pharmacy's sharing your prescription history, schools sharing your education history, and recent sharing issues even within Apple (China and likely Russia too, data sharing with publishers within Apple News and targeted ads within the App Store, and the new Apple supported Cloud Act that eases and simplifies the sharing of personal data with "friendlies") this whole conversation about "privacy" is little more than marketing fluff IMHO.

    All those paid services don't "protect your privacy" if the provider sees value in sharing it, economically or politically, more so than in keeping it to themselves. Words are easy. Actions are just a tad more difficult. 

    Please. The sum total of everything you listed pales in comparison to what Google or Facebook know about you. Also funny how you slip Apple into your list to imply they are somehow on the same level. They aren't.

    This is going to come back to bite Google and Facebook in the ass. Hard. It was only a matter of time before something happened that would bring privacy issues and data collection out into the public eye. Apple is going to come out of this smelling like a rose while Google and Facebook will smell like the piles of horseshit they are.
    Sum of all of them pales in comparison to Google? Have you ever bothered to look at what Google thinks they know about you? Probably not IMHO but you can anytime it tickles your fancy. Then you don't have to make stuff up, you can base it on actual knowledge.

    Instead it looks to me like you prefer the lazy (or is it disingenuous) route to FUD-rush, that an evil Google with evil intent factually knows more about your personal life than Experion, or Acxiom, or TransUnion, or a hundred other data aggregators who mine, partner, and outright pay for access to everything from your sexual and religious bent, to your psychological and medical conditions, to the layout of your home and your neighbors homes, to the demographics of your entire extended family and more? They aren't in it to place an ad based on anonymised baskets of web visitors like Google is. They're in it to sell pure data, your TV and on-line viewing habits, your banking and employment and income, where you go, what you do, what you eat... Just selling your personal data for any purpose the buyer wishes to use it for.

     Facebook? I'm not sure what they know or the extent of it, that's one I need to pull my data profile from before claiming anything based on any actual knowledge of it. I would suspect they know far more personal verified information in general than Google considering how they collect it but I could be wrong.

     So before posting things that may or may not be true but you want to present as fact, why not do the forum a favor and look and when it's simply your opinion make it more clear? IMHO we all have far more to fear from the Acxiom's and Equifax's of the world than an online ad purveyor. Your minimizing the privacy danger isn't particularly helpful to a common consumers understanding, nor is inferring that Apple has entirely clean hands and if you just faithfully trust them then your world is safe from intrusions on your personal life. There is no privacy safe house anymore,  particularly so in a digital world.
    Google CEO: "We Know Where You Are. We Know Where You've Been. We Can More Or Less Know What You're Thinking About." - Eric S.

    You either work at Google in PR or have totally swallowed the kool-aid and truly think they are 100% altruistic with no hidden profit motives (drug sales anyone?). Google absolutely knows more about you than Experion, or Acxiom, or TransUnion with no doubt. You made an errant assumption about the "evil Google" putting words into people's writing that simply did not exist.

    Companies offering things for "free" have to make money somewhere and Google is no different. Personally, I prefer a business relationship where I pay money (something of value) and get something of value in return. Data collection companies line 
    Experion, or Acxiom, or Facebook, or TransUnion, or Google, or Twitter I don't trust nearly as much. They don't serve my interests but the interests of a third party that may be adversarial to my interests.

    This FB/CA issue shows just how clearly these companies need to be tightly regulated on what data they collect, how you get access to it, how it gets destroyed if needed, and who gets access.

    So before posting things that may or may not be true but you want to present as fact, why not do the forum a favor and look and when it's simply your opinion make it more clear?
    magman1979redhotfuzzpropodwatto_cobrabaconstangwilliamlondonStrangeDays
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