Apple Watch heart rate, activity data key in Australian murder case

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in Apple Watch
Activity data recovered from an Apple Watch will be reportedly become key evidence for the prosecution in an Australian murder trial.




The victim, Myrna Nilsson, was allegedly murdered by her daughter-in-law Caroline at their Adelaide home in September 2016, the Daily Mail said. Caroline initially claimed that Myrna had been attacked by a group of men following a road rage encounter.

At a Thursday bail hearing, however, a prosecutor told the Adelaide Magistrates Court that a forensic expert had determined that Caroline's explanation was a lie. The Watch data is said to have narrowed the time between Myrna's attack and death to a seven-minute window, beginning with a burst of activity and ending with heart rate tracking coming to a halt.

This would appear to conflict with Caroline's statement that Myrna argued with her attackers for 20 minutes. Prosecutors have also suggested that Caroline texted her husband as little 17 minutes after the murder, then accessed eBay 11 minutes after that -- in spite of her alibi that she was also attacked and tied up.

The court ultimately rejected bail, citing the gravity of the charge, the strength of evidence, and Caroline's supposed attempts at hiding evidence.

Apple has been keen to have the Watch treated as a medical-grade device. The company has in fact partnered with Stanford on the Apple Heart Study, using voluntary data collection to help detect irregular heart rhythms.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 378member
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.
    cornchip
  • Reply 2 of 10
    Eric_WVGG said:
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.
    I guess they accessed the phone information
  • Reply 3 of 10
    asciiascii Posts: 5,778member
    Reminds me of novels where the murder is solved because the clock breaks showing a certain time.
    repressthiswlym
  • Reply 4 of 10
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,178member
    Eric_WVGG said:
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.

    access to the phone if the user didn't have a passcode lock. access to an iCloud backup (which holds your activity history)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 10
    Eric_WVGG said:
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.

    access to the phone if the user didn't have a passcode lock. access to an iCloud backup (which holds your activity history)

    Do Australia's laws protect a suspect's right to silence the way they do in the U.S.?  Or she might have actually voluntarily given the authorities the phone passcode, thinking there was nothing useful there.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    seanie248seanie248 Posts: 172member
    Eric_WVGG said:
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.

    access to the phone if the user didn't have a passcode lock. access to an iCloud backup (which holds your activity history)

    Do Australia's laws protect a suspect's right to silence the way they do in the U.S.?  Or she might have actually voluntarily given the authorities the phone passcode, thinking there was nothing useful there.
    Dont think she gave the passcode voluntarily, as she had just been murdered. 
    Notsofastbloodshotrollin'red
  • Reply 7 of 10
    If she had a husband, I'm sure he would readily provide the passcode to help solve her murder. If it was an iPhone X, a face unlock would work (eyes partially open at death - most relaxed state).
  • Reply 8 of 10
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 250member
    Eric_WVGG said:
    I’m a bit confused by how they retrieved this data.

    access to the phone if the user didn't have a passcode lock. access to an iCloud backup (which holds your activity history)

    Do Australia's laws protect a suspect's right to silence the way they do in the U.S.?  Or she might have actually voluntarily given the authorities the phone passcode, thinking there was nothing useful there.
    You're confusing the suspect with the victim.  It was the victim's watch. 
    wlymbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 9 of 10
    steveausteveau Posts: 175member
    Good police work!
  • Reply 10 of 10
    Notsofast said:

    Do Australia's laws protect a suspect's right to silence the way they do in the U.S.?  Or she might have actually voluntarily given the authorities the phone passcode, thinking there was nothing useful there.
    You're confusing the suspect with the victim.  It was the victim's watch. 

    I am indeed.  Mea culpa.
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