Review: 2018 iPad with Apple Pencil support might replace your iPad Pro

Posted:
in iPad edited April 3
Apple is aiming at the educational market with the new 2018 sixth generation iPad, but the addition of Apple Pencil support has generated a lot of commercial interest in the device. It is obviously superior to the popular iPad 2, but will it replace your iPad Pro?

Apple 2018 iPad review


Apple announced the new 2018 iPad, officially called the sixth generation iPad, at its "Field Trip" event. Nearly immediately, the complaints about no Face ID and similar high-end features erupted in social media, with some of it spilling into our forums.

If you thought that an education-focused event was going to have a high-end and expensive iPad debut, we're not sure what to tell you. That just doesn't make any sense, and would have been profoundly tone-deaf.

Anyway, right off the top, Apple has delivered an iteration on the iPad that has the same build quality, solidity, and ease of use as the previous generations. It is not revelatory, but it wasn't ever realistically expected to be.

AppleInsider telling you about an iPad and what it can do for you is a waste of time, because the odds are pretty good you're reading this review on one. Instead, lets delve into what sets the new iPad apart from older gear.

Non-laminated screen

Every other generation of iPad plus the iPad Air has a non-laminated screen, so upgraders will have the same screen that they've always had, assuming that they aren't coming from the non-Retina original iPad or iPad 2.

Apple decided in 2017 to use the non-laminated screen going forward with the lower-end of the product line, and keep the slimming laminated display on the Pro models. Given the educational focus, there is clearly an advantage to that -- if the glass breaks on the new iPad, it no longer necessitates a multi-hundred-dollar whole-screen replacement.

Apple Early 2018 iPad on stand


There were some complaints in 2017 that the laminated screen in the iPad Air 2 and iPad Pro can make some users feel closer to the interface. But, the non-laminated screen induces no lag or delay in icon movement -- nor has it ever.

Also as with the 2017 iPad, the display is not not a Wide Color with True Tone display, like in the iPad Pro, nor should anyone have ever expected it to be. However, color fidelity is the same as the iPad has always had, prior to Apple's enhancements for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro.

Apple Pencil support

The 2018 sixth generation iPad is the first non-Pro model to support the Apple Pencil. That may be enough to kick-start an upgrade for some users, but it's not at all clear how many new users will buy into it.

Unmistakably, Apple Pencil support is a good addition. The artist crowd loves it on the iPad Pro, but Apple hasn't shared what percentage of users are sketching away on it.

Responsiveness from the Apple Pencil is about the same as it is on the original 12.9-inch iPad Pro -- meaning pretty great. Our artists that we tapped to test it out still liked it just a hair better on the 2017 iPad Pro lineup, and far more than any Android equivalent that they had tried to that point.

Dimensions

The 2018 iPad is 240mm tall, 169.5mm wide, has a thickness of 7.5mm, and weighs 469 grams with Wi-Fi and 478 grams with LTE. The original iPad Air with A7 processor from October 2013 is dimensionally identical to the new iPad, including weight.

2018 iPad in Space Gray with Apple logo


The iPad Air 2 with A8X processor was originally released in October 2014 and is also 240 mm tall, and 169.5mm wide but is thinner, at just 6.1mm thick. The iPad Air 2 weighs 437 grams with wi-fi and 444 grams with LTE.

For comparison, the original iPad is 242.8mm tall, 189.7mm wide, 13.4mm thick, and weighs 680 grams.

In no way is the new iPad a burden to hold or use. While the difference in thickness between the 9.7-inch iPad Pro and the new iPad is barely noticeable, the difference in weight isn't really detectable between the two.

Protective cases

As with the 2017 model, the enclosure has an identical size and shape to the iPad Air. Also with the previous model, you'd think that cases from the iPad Air would be fine.

There's no physical lock/mute switch on the new iPad, and the speaker holes extend a bit further on the new iPad than most cases have holes for --but otherwise, even form-fitting protective cases like the Newer KX pictured here that were designed for the iPad Air work just fine to protect the iPad, even if the volume switches don't line up.



The 2018 iPad is in a better situation than when the 2017 launched. The case manufacturers have literally no work besides updating listings to add compatibility between the two models.

In short, unless you're replacing an iPad Air, plan on getting a new case.

Two speakers

Charitably, iPad speakers are adequate. Physics applies here, and the iPad simply lacks room for large speaker chambers. The 2018 iPad has two speakers, like last year's model -- with the iPad Pro having four.

Apple 2018 iPad speakers in Space Gray


To test the speakers, we did a blind test with 10 participants of varying ages. Without telling the participants which hardware they were listening to, we played back an assortment of tracks on an iPad mini 2, iPad Air, iPad Air 2, 9.7-inch iPad Pro, and the 2018 iPad including audio books purchased from iTunes, assorted selections from Apple Music, plus ALAC-encoded electronica, classic rock, rap, orchestra, and live rock performances ripped from CD using iTunes default settings. Listening ranges varied between three feet and eight feet behind the tester.

As with our 2017 iPad review, out of our 10 testers, at three feet, two identified the four speaker iPad Pro as having better quality, with the remainder calling the difference too close to tell between the four-speaker iPad Pro, the iPad Air 2, and the 2018 iPad. At eight feet, none of our testers could tell the difference.

Cameras

We're only making a slight nod in this direction. The cameras are identical to those on the fifth generation iPad, and are functional. They aren't nearly as good as the cameras on the iPhone 7, iPhone 8, or iPhone X -- but they aren't intended to be.

Picture quality between the 2018 iPad, the 2017 iPad, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, the first generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro, and the iPad Air 2 are essentially indistinguishable.

Apple 2018 iPad camera


This all said, don't be that person taking pictures at a concert or other public venue on an iPad.

Benchmarks

As expected and predicted, the new iPad is quick. The benchmarks using Geekbench 4 that we, and other users, have obtained are a bit faster than expected.

The new iPad hits 3254 in the Geekbench single-core performance metric, climbing to 5857 in multi-core. For comparison, the 9.7-inch iPad Air 2 from 2014 has a Geekbench single-core score of 1782 and a multi-core rating of 3992, with the 9.7-inch iPad Pro having a single core score of 2944 and a multi-core 4786.

Apple sixth generation iPad in Gold


Looking at benchmarks for the Mac, the late 2015 i5-6600 iMac 27-inch Retina Display has a single-core score of 4840 with a multi-core score of 13,082. The mid-2017 MacBook with Core i5-7Y54 processor at 1.2 GHz base frequency with a "turbo" frequency of 3.2GHz has a single-core score of 3612, with a multicore benchmark of 6977..

Real-world performance

The new iPad isn't just fast by the numbers, it's quick in every day use. We've done a wide array of comparison pieces already with the benchmarks, and the long and the short of it is, unless you have an iPad Pro from 2017, the new one is faster, and not necessarily by a lot.

Gold 2018 Apple iPad


It's still not quite clear what software on the iPad can fully utilize multiple processors, and processors before the A11 Bionic don't handle symmetric multiprocessing all that well -- this iPad included. But, in all of our real-world use, confirming the benchmarks, the new dual-core iPad handily beat the triple-core A8X in the iPad Air 2, as well as the now two-year-old 9.7-inch iPad Pro.

As far as internet use goes, if you're not loading the data as fast as the processor can take it, there's no point in a faster processor. The new iPad has faster 802.11ac Wi-Fi according to Apple, but it's not quite clear what they mean, or what they're comparing it to, as pages loaded at basically the same speed on the fifth generation also with 802.11ac as they do on the sixth.

Once more, with feeling

Stop us if you've heard any of this before. This year's iPad review isn't hugely different than last year's. But, like the technology itself, things change more when looked at in a two or three year window, rather than only one year.

The new iPad follows in the footsteps of the the 2017 iPad. Both are the closest thing we've seen from Apple that approaches the lower end of the tablet market.

But, it isn't going to revolutionize education. It isn't cheap enough to really draw in administrators already dealing with tight education budgets, but more importantly, it isn't making educational content any cheaper. Although this is a complex conversation and one we will have another day, the addition of an Apple Pencil to the device won't be enough to break the hold that cheap Chromebooks have on education, despite the iPad having a technological advantage.

What we do have, though, is a tablet specifically aimed at people with older iPads, in an effort to convince them to get a new device. The 2018 sixth generation iPad splits the arrow in the bullseye of the target that the 2017 iPad hit last year at about this time of year.

If you have the iPad Air 2 or older, or the 9.7-inch iPad Pro and are looking to upgrade, the 2018 sixth generation iPad is unquestionably a good buy. Realize, though, that if you have Air 2 or 9.7-inch iPad Pro, you'll lose the laminated display, but the better performance may be worth it.

But, those looking for Apple's mightiest iPad regardless of cost just need to sit this one out. It's a lot closer this year, though.

Score: 4.5 out of 5

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Where to buy

Apple's brand-new 2018 iPad can be purchased from Apple authorized resellers with tax incentives for many shoppers. Both Adorama and B&H will not collect sales tax on orders shipped outside NY and NJ (B&H may report sales in CO and VT*, however), potentially saving customers up to $45 compared to buying direct. Shipping is also free to the contiguous U.S. For a full list of deals and product availability, please visit our 2018 iPad Price Guide.

2018 iPad (Wi-Fi Only) deals

  • 32GB Silver Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @Adorama * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Silver Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @B&H * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Space Gray Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @Adorama * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Space Gray Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @B&H * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Gold Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @Adorama * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Gold Wi-Fi Only for $329.00 @B&H * ($26 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Silver Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @Adorama * ($34 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Silver Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Space Gray Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @Adorama * ($34 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Space Gray Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Gold Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @Adorama * ($34 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Gold Wi-Fi Only for $429.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
2018 iPad (Wi-Fi + Cellular) deals

  • 32GB Silver Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @Adorama * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Silver Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Space Gray Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @Adorama * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Space Gray Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Gold Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @Adorama * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 32GB Gold Wi-Fi + Cellular for $459.00 @B&H * ($37 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Silver Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @Adorama * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Silver Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @B&H * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Space Gray Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @Adorama * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Space Gray Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @B&H * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Gold Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @Adorama * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
  • 128GB Gold Wi-Fi + Cellular for $559.00 @B&H * ($45 off in tax outside NY and NJ)
    *B&H and Adorama will not collect sales tax on orders shipped outside NY & NJ. CO and VT residents, see here.
Apple Pencil deals

  • Apple Pencil (Refurbished) for $79.99 @TechRabbit * ($20 off + free shipping)
  • Apple Pencil (New) for $99.00 @Adorama * ($8 off in tax outside NY & NJ)
    *Adorama will not collect sales tax on orders shipped outside NY & NJ.
GeorgeBMac
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,099member
    DON’T TELL ME THAT!!!! 😡
    napoleon_phoneapart
  • Reply 2 of 34
    tipootipoo Posts: 942member
    Does it poll the pencil at 240Hz like the Pro (even the OG pre-ProMotion)? And by extension, finger input at 120? 

    This page hasn't updated 

    https://developer.apple.com/library/content/documentation/DeviceInformation/Reference/iOSDeviceCompatibility/Displays/Displays.html
    edited April 2 Soli
  • Reply 3 of 34
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,323administrator
    tipoo said:
    Does it poll the pencil at 240Hz like the Pro (even the OG pre-ProMotion)? And by extension, finger input at 120? 

    This page hasn't updated 

    https://developer.apple.com/library/content/documentation/DeviceInformation/Reference/iOSDeviceCompatibility/Displays/Displays.html
    Hard to tell. The responsiveness is identical to the first gen 12.9-inch iPad Pro, but not quite as good as the 2017 iPad Pro. It's still very, very good.
    GeorgeBMacSoli
  • Reply 4 of 34
    Eh, I would never be able to go back to a 9.7 iPad, and the 4GB of RAM in the Pro models makes a pretty big difference if you really start to use the iPad for heavy lifting types of apps. I think it's a very good product for people that are interested in the Apple Pencil though and didn't previously buy a Pro model. Best ever non-Pro model for sure. I also think that this likely means that the next Pro models will have some REALLY crazy benchmarks.
    SpamSandwichcornchipmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 5 of 34
     Don’t be that person who parrots the 2016 meme of not using your iPad for iPad photography. We have moved on since then as have the cameras. Now we are aware that not everybody’s eyesight is the same and that the use of the larger view finder benefits and aids many with impaired vision or who simply prefer a larger view finder to take great photos. We are no more in the way then those people with those huge phones.  Please move into 2018 and stop trotting out that old offensive anti-iPad photography myth. Many of us who aren’t 20/20 would thank you for it.

    And since Apple never did anything with the smart connector other than allow a few keyboards to connect to it, it doesn’t even count as a pro benefit. I think this 2018 iPad with pencil support  will definitely give the pros a run for their money.
    ronnmacplusplus
  • Reply 6 of 34
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,903member
    I would buy it for the kids at home, but for me. I'm so happy with the 12.9" Pro.
    albegarc
  • Reply 7 of 34
    thttht Posts: 2,856member
    It's still not quite clear what software on the iPad can fully utilize multiple processors, and processors before the A11 Bionic don't handle symmetric multiprocessing all that well -- this iPad included.
    All Apple SoC multicore processors handle symmetric multiprocessing perfectly fine.

    The A10 SoC CPU is a dual-core symmetric multiprocessing architecture with process/thread migration between two high performance cores and two low performance cores for lower power usage (4 cores total). If the system encountered a task that didn’t require a lot of power, it would migrate the processes to the low performance cores and let the high performance cores idle, saving power consumption, or vice versa. There are four cores there, but, the system only sees it as two cores. Kind of like voltage and frequency scaling in a CPU to conserve power, but it has special lower power cores that use less power than the lowest power setting that a high performance core can achieve.

    The A11 SoC CPU is a 6 core heterogenous multiprocessing architecture. This is where the system sees all 6 cores, 2 high performance and 4 low power, at the same time, and the system will migrate processes/threads between high and low power cores per whatever algorithm they use. The cores aren’t “symmetric”, ie, the same, and hence heterogeneous instead of symmetric.
    If you have the iPad Air 2 or older, or the 9.7-inch iPad Pro and are looking to upgrade, the 2018 sixth generation iPad is unquestionably a good buy. Realize, though, that if you have Air 2 or 9.7-inch iPad Pro, you'll lose the laminated display, but the better performance may be worth it.
    I wouldn’t upgrade from an iPad Pro 9.7. It’s overall a better device than the 6th gen iPad. Heck, I’d get a used iPad Pro 9.7 over a 6th gen iPad, and it would still cost more. A9X vs A10: About 20% less CPU, but 20% better GPU. Thinner, Smart Connector, better display. 

    Air 2, yes, especially if one bought one in 2014 or 2015.
    stantheman
  • Reply 8 of 34
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 198member
    My iPhone X has me convinced all my future mobile devices WILL have Face ID so I’ll be waiting for that shoe to drop for iPad. I’d guess in the next iPad Pro?
    stantheman
  • Reply 9 of 34
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,389member
    Anti-reflective coating? I don't believe the cheaper iPads have it.
    goldenclaw
  • Reply 10 of 34
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 105member
    JFC_PA said:
    My iPhone X has me convinced all my future mobile devices WILL have Face ID so I’ll be waiting for that shoe to drop for iPad. I’d guess in the next iPad Pro?
    I don't know if Face ID on an iPad will work as well as on an iPhone X. I use the iPad Pro with the connected keyboard more than 50% of the time which means an iPad FaceID will have to work from a longer distance than the iPhone. Also, when not attached to the keyboard, I'm almost always in portrait mode. Now FaceID will have to work in both orientations or it will become very annoying.

    I wonder if Apple has fixes for these issues already. FaceID isn't even 1 years old.
    mike1firelockmuthuk_vanalingamstantheman
  • Reply 11 of 34
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,903member
    JFC_PA said:
    My iPhone X has me convinced all my future mobile devices WILL have Face ID so I’ll be waiting for that shoe to drop for iPad. I’d guess in the next iPad Pro?
    iPad is not really a personal device but shared gadget within family. Face ID really defeats that purpose. Unless Apple allows multiple Face ID in iPad Pro (I think they may), Face ID in iPad is nothing more than a gimmick.
    dewme
  • Reply 12 of 34
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,906member
    This less expensive, smaller iPad isn't for me, but I do hope it opens up more people to the entire iOS and iPad experience, which has been THE greatest performing computing platform in my Apple experience so far.
  • Reply 13 of 34
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,691member
    This latest iPad is clearly the result of Apple placing primary emphasis on the use cases that the product must support and then building a device that provides suitable performance at a reasonable price for a reasonable expected product (useful) lifetime. This is a pragmatic product resulting from a pragmatic approach.

    The current generation of iPad Pros have stunning designs, specifications, performance, and versatility that showcase the best of what Apple's product teams can come up with every release cycle. Unfortunately the iPad Pro beasts aren't being asked to do anything more than the latest "budget" iPad is asked to do. The current iPad Pros are underutilized. Maybe this will change? At a minimum I hope that the Pro models get a version of iOS that supports multiple users and "Pro" applications like  XCode Pro iOS Edition, Final Cut Pro iOS Edition, Logic Pro X iOS Edition, etc., as well as desktop equivalent versions of the iWork suite, of course with full work file format compatibility with their macOS editions. The last thing I want is macOS running on my iPad Pro because it's too dated and keyboard+mouse centric. But I would very much like to have an iOS Pro Edition that breaks free of the shackles of an operating system designed to run on an iPod Touch.

    Apple's going to have a bang-for-the-buck problem on its hands with the iPad Pro product line if they don't put more bang in the OS and applications that the Pros need to justify their high-end potential - and prices.
    edited April 2 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 34
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,323administrator
    SiriLover said:
     Don’t be that person who parrots the 2016 meme of not using your iPad for iPad photography. We have moved on since then as have the cameras. Now we are aware that not everybody’s eyesight is the same and that the use of the larger view finder benefits and aids many with impaired vision or who simply prefer a larger view finder to take great photos. We are no more in the way then those people with those huge phones.  Please move into 2018 and stop trotting out that old offensive anti-iPad photography myth. Many of us who aren’t 20/20 would thank you for it.

    And since Apple never did anything with the smart connector other than allow a few keyboards to connect to it, it doesn’t even count as a pro benefit. I think this 2018 iPad with pencil support  will definitely give the pros a run for their money.
    You can do it, but it's a dick move to the people behind you who are using their iPhones to capture the same thing -- and who also may be pushing somebody in a wheelchair who doesn't want to see your iPad.

    So, I will continue to say it as I please. You want to use your iPad? Fine, be courteous to the others with disabilities around you-- but in my experience, that doesn't seem to be the case.
    edited April 2 bestkeptsecretMartin57
  • Reply 15 of 34
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,437member
    To keep the iPad Pro sales up, my guess is that the pros will get a solid update this year.
    - FaceID & TrueDepth front facing camera
    - 12.9" to get reduced bezel design
    - Screen enhancements
    - Updated cameras - perhaps same as iPhone X/8
    - Base storage update
    - screaming fast A11
    - s/w focus on AR to utilize both the TD camera and the SoC capabilities
    - perhaps some smart connector accessories are introduced to make this a positive differentiator
    - Apple Pencil v2 (maybe with smart connector charging)?
    albegarcGeorgeBMacmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 34
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,437member
    dewme said:
    This latest iPad is clearly the result of Apple placing primary emphasis on the use cases that the product must support and then building a device that provides suitable performance at a reasonable price for a reasonable expected product (useful) lifetime. This is a pragmatic product resulting from a pragmatic approach.

    The current generation of iPad Pros have stunning designs, specifications, performance, and versatility that showcase the best of what Apple's product teams can come up with every release cycle. Unfortunately the iPad Pro beasts aren't being asked to do anything more than the latest "budget" iPad is asked to do. The current iPad Pros are underutilized. Maybe this will change? At a minimum I hope that the Pro models get a version of iOS that supports multiple users and "Pro" applications like  XCode Pro iOS Edition, Final Cut Pro iOS Edition  Logic Pro X iOS Edition  as well as desktop equivalent versions of the iWork suite, of course with full work file format compatibility with their macOS editions. The last thing I want is macOS running on my iPad Pro because it's too dated and keyboard+mouse centric. But I would very much like to have an iOS Pro Edition that breaks free of the shackles of an operating system designed to run on an iPod Touch.

    Apple's going to have a bang-for-the-buck problem on its hands with the iPad Pro product line if they don't put more bang in the OS and applications that the Pros need to justify their high-end potential - and prices.
    Agree in general.  Apple needs to push s/w to enable users to get the full functionality that the performance of the iPad Pros allows.
    GeorgeBMaccanukstorm
  • Reply 17 of 34
    goldenclawgoldenclaw Posts: 254member
    cpsro said:
    Anti-reflective coating? I don't believe the cheaper iPads have it.
    This is what I am interested to know as well. The iPad Air 2 has anti-reflective coating and that's what I would prefer. There is a noticeable difference between the Air 2 and the 2017 5th Gen.
  • Reply 18 of 34
    roakeroake Posts: 602member
    SiriLover said:
     Don’t be that person who parrots the 2016 meme of not using your iPad for iPad photography. We have moved on since then as have the cameras. Now we are aware that not everybody’s eyesight is the same and that the use of the larger view finder benefits and aids many with impaired vision or who simply prefer a larger view finder to take great photos. We are no more in the way then those people with those huge phones.  Please move into 2018 and stop trotting out that old offensive anti-iPad photography myth. Many of us who aren’t 20/20 would thank you for it.

    And since Apple never did anything with the smart connector other than allow a few keyboards to connect to it, it doesn’t even count as a pro benefit. I think this 2018 iPad with pencil support  will definitely give the pros a run for their money.
    I wear glasses and use my iPhone.
  • Reply 19 of 34
    SiriLover said:
     Don’t be that person who parrots the 2016 meme of not using your iPad for iPad photography. We have moved on since then as have the cameras. Now we are aware that not everybody’s eyesight is the same and that the use of the larger view finder benefits and aids many with impaired vision or who simply prefer a larger view finder to take great photos. We are no more in the way then those people with those huge phones.  Please move into 2018 and stop trotting out that old offensive anti-iPad photography myth. Many of us who aren’t 20/20 would thank you for it.

    And since Apple never did anything with the smart connector other than allow a few keyboards to connect to it, it doesn’t even count as a pro benefit. I think this 2018 iPad with pencil support  will definitely give the pros a run for their money.
    You can do it, but it's a dick move to the people behind you who are using their iPhones to capture the same thing -- and who also may be pushing somebody in a wheelchair who doesn't want to see your iPad.

    So, I will continue to say it as I please. You want to use your iPad? Fine, be courteous to the others with disabilities around you-- but in my experience, that doesn't seem to be the case.

  • Reply 20 of 34
     It is indeed all about being courteous. There have been people with large iPhone cameras that get in my way as well. I don’t have an iPhone. I use my iPad to  take pictures because of my eyesight disability,  and I am courteous. Your anecdotal evidence is not always the norm, you know.
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