Apple to take over two storefronts with expanded Lehigh Valley outlet

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple's Lehigh Valley Mall store in Whitehall, Pa. is relocating to a bigger space, with plans to throw open the new doors in September.

The current Lehigh Valley store.
The current Lehigh Valley store.


The shop will in fact combine two spaces previously held by J. Crew and Ann Taylor, according to The Morning Call, pointing to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing by the mall's co-owner, Simon Property Group. It's not immediately known when construction will start or when the old location will close its doors.

The original Lehigh Valley store dates back to 2007, when the mall launched a $40 million expansion. It's relatively cramped by modern Apple standards, without the room to display much of the 2018 product line.

The company will presumably use the relocation as an opportunity to switch to its latest design motif, which includes wooden shelves, oversized video displays, and -- where room is available -- things like trees and seating for Today at Apple events. Apple has been renovating and/or relocating many of its U.S. stores, some of which predate the iPhone and haven't kept up with Apple's evolving size, wealth, and aesthetics.

Whitehall is on the outskirts of Allentown, and Apple's store there serves that city as well as a number of surrounding communities.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,445member
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


  • Reply 2 of 9
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,687member
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    Apple  will be fine. They look for high traffic areas to put stores. In addition, they look for stable shopping centers as well. They aren't looking at rundown malls. Apple doesn't just sell goods. They provide  a service. They will be a reason  for people to go to an Apple store. 
    macxpress
  • Reply 3 of 9
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    I live in the Lehigh Valley, so this is my local Apple Store. It's always packed when I go (even during the week) and this expansion will give them some much-needed space. On busy Saturdays you can barely walk around in there, and the article is correct that there's barely any room for the latest products. They have 1 table of iPhone, 1 table of iPad, 1 table of Apple Watch, and 1 table of MacBook Pros. They have small shelves on the side of the store where they have like one of each laptop other than MBPs, an Apple TV, a Mac Pro, and a couple of Beats headphones. The accessory wall is really small and has super limited selection, and there are only 5-6 seats at the Genius Bar. The mall in general gets a ton of traffic and I always have to park far away when I go. So worry not, the business at this store isn't going away anytime soon. This is in an outdoor, strip-mall style area on the property of the traditional (enclosed) mall, which also gets plenty of traffic. 
    edited April 2018
  • Reply 4 of 9
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,140member
    nathreed said:
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    I live in the Lehigh Valley, so this is my local Apple Store. It's always packed when I go (even during the week) and this expansion will give them some much-needed space. On busy Saturdays you can barely walk around in there, and the article is correct that there's barely any room for the latest products. They have 1 table of iPhone, 1 table of iPad, 1 table of Apple Watch, and 1 table of MacBook Pros. They have small shelves on the side of the store where they have like one of each laptop other than MBPs, an Apple TV, a Mac Pro, and a couple of Beats headphones. The accessory wall is really small and has super limited selection, and there are only 5-6 seats at the Genius Bar. The mall in general gets a ton of traffic and I always have to park far away when I go. So worry not, the business at this store isn't going away anytime soon. This is in an outdoor, strip-mall style area on the property of the traditional (enclosed) mall, which also gets plenty of traffic. 
    I can confirm everything said here about this mall. I live in this region and this mall is very highly trafficked (it killed the Whitehall Mall across the street, and it is the center of holiday shopping for the Lehigh Valley. It's an utter nightmare during xmas (traffic alone is abysmal throughout December). The Apple Store is always full and is too small for the number of people it services.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    FolioFolio Posts: 552member
    Irony in taking over Ann Taylor and j crew. Just read a report on retail clothier woes. It’s not just Amazon effect. It’s mainstream America has less discretionary $$$ in budget for clothes. electronic gear much bigger slice. I can see future cartoon. Guy w family in rags holding latest mobile phones.
  • Reply 6 of 9
    dysamoria said:
    nathreed said:
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    I live in the Lehigh Valley, so this is my local Apple Store. It's always packed when I go (even during the week) and this expansion will give them some much-needed space. On busy Saturdays you can barely walk around in there, and the article is correct that there's barely any room for the latest products. They have 1 table of iPhone, 1 table of iPad, 1 table of Apple Watch, and 1 table of MacBook Pros. They have small shelves on the side of the store where they have like one of each laptop other than MBPs, an Apple TV, a Mac Pro, and a couple of Beats headphones. The accessory wall is really small and has super limited selection, and there are only 5-6 seats at the Genius Bar. The mall in general gets a ton of traffic and I always have to park far away when I go. So worry not, the business at this store isn't going away anytime soon. This is in an outdoor, strip-mall style area on the property of the traditional (enclosed) mall, which also gets plenty of traffic. 
    I can confirm everything said here about this mall. I live in this region and this mall is very highly trafficked (it killed the Whitehall Mall across the street, and it is the center of holiday shopping for the Lehigh Valley. It's an utter nightmare during xmas (traffic alone is abysmal throughout December). The Apple Store is always full and is too small for the number of people it services.
    The previous two comments are so accurate. More than once I had seen some people thrown a tantrum when the show up without an appointment expecting to be in and out fast. Even with an appointment the wait time here is considerable. I am so glad for this expansion.  
  • Reply 7 of 9
    dysamoria said:
    nathreed said:
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    I live in the Lehigh Valley, so this is my local Apple Store. It's always packed when I go (even during the week) and this expansion will give them some much-needed space. On busy Saturdays you can barely walk around in there, and the article is correct that there's barely any room for the latest products. They have 1 table of iPhone, 1 table of iPad, 1 table of Apple Watch, and 1 table of MacBook Pros. They have small shelves on the side of the store where they have like one of each laptop other than MBPs, an Apple TV, a Mac Pro, and a couple of Beats headphones. The accessory wall is really small and has super limited selection, and there are only 5-6 seats at the Genius Bar. The mall in general gets a ton of traffic and I always have to park far away when I go. So worry not, the business at this store isn't going away anytime soon. This is in an outdoor, strip-mall style area on the property of the traditional (enclosed) mall, which also gets plenty of traffic. 
    I can confirm everything said here about this mall. I live in this region and this mall is very highly trafficked (it killed the Whitehall Mall across the street, and it is the center of holiday shopping for the Lehigh Valley. It's an utter nightmare during xmas (traffic alone is abysmal throughout December). The Apple Store is always full and is too small for the number of people it services.
    Let’s be real though, traffic at the mall is abysmal most of the time!
  • Reply 8 of 9
    This mall is very busy. To avoid most of the traffic, I need to go before noon on weekdays. Apple could probably benefit from a separate exit from US22, and a restricted parking area. The employees at this store almost trip over each other. More crowded than the Christiana store, which is four times the size.
  • Reply 9 of 9
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,140member
    nathreed said:
    dysamoria said:
    nathreed said:
    zoetmb said:
    I hope Apple doesn't sign long-term leases because a lot of malls aren't going to be around too much longer, especially in regions that are oversaturated with malls.   E-commerce (and the decline of the middle class) is largely killing off this type of shopping.   I live in an apartment building with 205 apartments, the majority elderly and in spite of the fact that there's a zillion stores within walking distance, three malls within 2 miles and a practically unlimited number of retailers a local bus or subway ride away, we get 50 packages a day delivered to the building.   Add in some especially busy days around Xmas and we're talking at least (since I'm not counting Amazon deliveries on Sundays), 16,000 packages a year.     I don't see how most of the physical retailers can survive except in locations where there's still incredible foot traffic.    

    Even before e-commerce, I've been in malls in middle America where one could throw a bowling ball down the hallway during the day and not hit anyone.


    I live in the Lehigh Valley, so this is my local Apple Store. It's always packed when I go (even during the week) and this expansion will give them some much-needed space. On busy Saturdays you can barely walk around in there, and the article is correct that there's barely any room for the latest products. They have 1 table of iPhone, 1 table of iPad, 1 table of Apple Watch, and 1 table of MacBook Pros. They have small shelves on the side of the store where they have like one of each laptop other than MBPs, an Apple TV, a Mac Pro, and a couple of Beats headphones. The accessory wall is really small and has super limited selection, and there are only 5-6 seats at the Genius Bar. The mall in general gets a ton of traffic and I always have to park far away when I go. So worry not, the business at this store isn't going away anytime soon. This is in an outdoor, strip-mall style area on the property of the traditional (enclosed) mall, which also gets plenty of traffic. 
    I can confirm everything said here about this mall. I live in this region and this mall is very highly trafficked (it killed the Whitehall Mall across the street, and it is the center of holiday shopping for the Lehigh Valley. It's an utter nightmare during xmas (traffic alone is abysmal throughout December). The Apple Store is always full and is too small for the number of people it services.
    Let’s be real though, traffic at the mall is abysmal most of the time!
    Yeah, the civil engineering of this area was so very myopic in its scope of vision. MacArthur as a major thoroughfare sucks with its forced flow (having to make right turns to cross to the opposite side, sitting at cross-traffic lights and making left turns to do so). Most of the businesses right against the road (and all the traffic) suffer from the split roadway. The strip mall shopping centers are mostly invisible from the roadway and the access into and out of the mall is clumsy and clogged...

    But I've also seen worse. There's a theatre I've been driving to for the monthly Studio Ghibli films where getting to the theatre entrance requires a bizarrely out-of-the-way driving path through the parking lots, when there's only one side of the mall (the back and sides are not parking and entrances like the Lehigh Valley Mall, which is a kind of island inside a monstrous cluster of parking lots). Neither Apple Maps or Google could direct us to the theatre without throwing us down a dead end or down the service access road where only stores' stock shipments come in.
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