Google announces Android P, with strong emphasis on 'free and open'

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 8
As expected, at the 2018 Google I/O developer's conference, the company has announced a new version of Android, with a beta program starting on Tuesday for a small sliver of devices.

Android P


Google Vice President of Android Engineering Dave Burke gave the presentation on the new operating system, calling it an "important first step towards the vision of AI at the core of the operating system" on smartphones. Google has three core tenets of the operating system: Intelligence, Simplicity, and Digital Well-Being.

Intelligence

Google highlighted its partnership with DeepMind on a new adaptive battery technology designed to give a more consistent battery experience. The routines predict which apps to use in the next few hours, and which later, saving cycles and battery power.

Initial testing is reportedly showing a 30 percent reduction in CPU wake-ups for apps in general. The reduction, combined with other process improvements in big/little processor scheduling is showing battery life increases for "many" users, according to Burke.

Android P will also adapt to usage patterns. One feature discussed is a new adaptive brightness, taking in to account not just the ambient light, but the user's preferences in those lighting conditions.

Burke noted that the machine learning was all being performed on the user's device, keeping the user information private.

Simplicity

Google has also implemented new multi-tasking gestures, and altering navigation through the phone. For instance, volume control has been simplified and adjusts the media volume by default, with a simpler toggle for the phone ringer.

Device rotation has been changed as well, with the user now being able to tap a button that pops up contextually after a physical rotation of the device.

Other changes have been made, but Google did not elaborate on them during the keynote.

Digital Well-being

Google claims that 70 percent of its users have asked for help with device management. To accomplish that goal, Android P has implemented a Dashboard, to tell users how much time they spend in each app, with an attempt to identify "meaningful engagement."

The Dashboard allows users to set time limits on apps, and will grey out apps that have exceeded the allowable time that the user has set.

Android P Dashboard


Notifications have been altered as well, to help users find the "right balance with technology." Improvements have been made to silence not only texts and calls, but a silencing of notifications as well.

The mode is enabled by turning a phone face-down on a surface. "Shush" mode has a white-list, so important contacts can break through even if the phone has been silenced.

A Wind-Down mode has been implemented, shifting a phone into greyscale, making it "less engaging" according to the presentation. On wake-up in the morning, the colors return to normal.

Digital Well-Being will be a big focus, alongside "hundreds" of other improvements to the platform.

Android P devices


The Android P Beta is now available on Pixel devices, and seven other manufacturer's flagships. Manufacturers with flagship devices that can get the beta are Nokia, Vivo, HT, Xiaomi, Sony, Essential, and Oppo -- with Samsung nowhere to be found.

Google faces an uphill battle for adoption, as it does every year. As of April, Google Oreo, teased at the 2017 Google I/O at this time in 2017, had about 4.6 percent adoption.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 70
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 493member


    similarities? same colors (oh wait, the tint is slightly off). And the ends are straight and not rounded (so i guess nope, completely different)
    edited May 8 jbdragoncornchiplolliverbrian greenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 70
    horvatichorvatic Posts: 87member
    Malware and viruses. Open is good but it also brings the very bad with it.
    racerhomie3jbdragonmejsricjeffharrisanton zuykovlolliverbrian greenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 70
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,276member
    Thanks for the freaking headache, Google. What the fup is up with that logo?!?!?
    cornchiplolliverlordjohnwhorfinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 70
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,321member
    jkichline said:
    Thanks for the freaking headache, Google. What the fup is up with that logo?!?!?
    It's a Caution, Lack of Privacy, sign.
    racerhomie3jbdragonfotoformatjeffharrislolliverbrian greenRayz2016lordjohnwhorfinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 70
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 2,745member
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    caladanianmobius
  • Reply 6 of 70
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,544administrator
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    brian green
  • Reply 7 of 70
    perpetual3perpetual3 Posts: 47member
    Machine learning for battery life is good.  

    I’m not sure I see the hype in the ringer/volume changes. 

    The dahsboard May be a good idea, we’ll have to wait and see.  

    I already have my ringer and  per app notifications set.  I suppose machine learning can predict those too.  

    Digital well being is a good move.  The key point is that the smartphone is engaging. Some describe it as the most interesting thing in our lives.  Yet, I think it’s the connectivity and content that make it engaging.  Social media, forums, news sites, videos, texts, emails,  etc, more so than colors. At least for me - I went all grayscale for a while, didn’t make the phone any less engaging (but certainly annoying when a paper uses multicolored graphs and diagrams to represent data).  
  • Reply 8 of 70
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    While I agree with the sentiment and would like to see major improvements to Siri, I also wonder how much it matters.  Most iOS users I know rarely use Siri (same goes for my Android friends and Assistant) on their phones.  I see it the most with people using Apple Watch but even then it’s mostly to send texts or set reminders (and occasionally for HomeKit).  With that in mind, would big changes to Siri even be noticed by the vast majority of iOS users?  I HOPE so but I guess it remains to be seen.

    There’s also the way voice assistants have “improved” over the years.  Apple has frequently touted Siri’s ability to pull up sports scores and stats etc., but again, I rarely see people be excited about it.  If you don’t care about sports (like me) then you’ll rarely use that feature, and if you’re INTO sports you’re likely not going to be satisfied with the limited results Siri provides or not want them (from the standpoint of not wanting to know the final score until watching the actual game).  Is all the sports stuff an improvement to Siri? Certainly. But how much to it increase engagement?  That’s what I want to know and likely never will.  But I feel like that’s where ALL virtual assistants need to improve, getting people engaged in using them.
    ronnsteven n.watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 70
    ols said:
    Thanks but this forum was about Apple products. How is this relevant?
    Do we need to live in an Apple bubble? In a general sense it’s good to know what’s going on outside of your own circle.  Maybe the grass really is greener on the other side of the fence. And knowing where “the competition” is heading isn’t bad either.

    Although, some people are satisfied with the status quo, so...
    jbdragonavon b7ronnSolilollivermuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 10 of 70
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,454member
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    Siri doesn't need help.  She needs a transplant
    ronnwillcropoint
  • Reply 11 of 70
    BluntBlunt Posts: 197member
    Free and open. LOL. A coder had some free sparetime and drew an open a logo for free not knowing anything about graphic design.
    edited May 8 jeffharriswatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 70
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,454member
    horvatic said:
    Malware and viruses. Open is good but it also brings the very bad with it.
    Depends on who you believe.  According to Google's Head of Security, Android 8 is just as secure as iOS.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/google-android-is-just-as-secure-as-ios-iphone-david-kleidermacher/#ftag=CAD590a51e
  • Reply 13 of 70
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 18,472member
    ols said:
    Thanks but this forum was about Apple products. How is this relevant?
    So you'll have a better idea of the new features coming to iOS12 

    /s
    ;)
    franklinjackcon
  • Reply 14 of 70
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 2,745member
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    It’s not good when you see pro Apple writers/analysts wishing Apple was doing things Google is doing. Ben Bajarin has been reliably pro-Apple in his analysis over the years but I see him becoming increasingly more pessimistic, especially around Siri & AI. Ben isn’t someone who writes for clicks. He’s not a concern troll. It really frustrates me that Apple allowed others to leapfrog in this space. I’ll bet a lot more people would use Siri if it was better and more useful.
    canukstormSolicaladaniandysamoria
  • Reply 15 of 70
    seankillseankill Posts: 346member
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    While I agree with the sentiment and would like to see major improvements to Siri, I also wonder how much it matters.  Most iOS users I know rarely use Siri (same goes for my Android friends and Assistant) on their phones.  I see it the most with people using Apple Watch but even then it’s mostly to send texts or set reminders (and occasionally for HomeKit).  With that in mind, would big changes to Siri even be noticed by the vast majority of iOS users?  I HOPE so but I guess it remains to be seen.

    There’s also the way voice assistants have “improved” over the years.  Apple has frequently touted Siri’s ability to pull up sports scores and stats etc., but again, I rarely see people be excited about it.  If you don’t care about sports (like me) then you’ll rarely use that feature, and if you’re INTO sports you’re likely not going to be satisfied with the limited results Siri provides or not want them (from the standpoint of not wanting to know the final score until watching the actual game).  Is all the sports stuff an improvement to Siri? Certainly. But how much to it increase engagement?  That’s what I want to know and likely never will.  But I feel like that’s where ALL virtual assistants need to improve, getting people engaged in using them.
    No one uses Siri because it sucks. It needs work and I think Apple will respond....in ‘19. 
    Solicaladanian
  • Reply 16 of 70
    tylerdtylerd Posts: 26member
    Forget the rest of that noise, shush mode is a great idea  :)
  • Reply 17 of 70
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,904member
    seankill said:
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    While I agree with the sentiment and would like to see major improvements to Siri, I also wonder how much it matters.  Most iOS users I know rarely use Siri (same goes for my Android friends and Assistant) on their phones.  I see it the most with people using Apple Watch but even then it’s mostly to send texts or set reminders (and occasionally for HomeKit).  With that in mind, would big changes to Siri even be noticed by the vast majority of iOS users?  I HOPE so but I guess it remains to be seen.

    There’s also the way voice assistants have “improved” over the years.  Apple has frequently touted Siri’s ability to pull up sports scores and stats etc., but again, I rarely see people be excited about it.  If you don’t care about sports (like me) then you’ll rarely use that feature, and if you’re INTO sports you’re likely not going to be satisfied with the limited results Siri provides or not want them (from the standpoint of not wanting to know the final score until watching the actual game).  Is all the sports stuff an improvement to Siri? Certainly. But how much to it increase engagement?  That’s what I want to know and likely never will.  But I feel like that’s where ALL virtual assistants need to improve, getting people engaged in using them.
    No one uses Siri because it sucks. It needs work and I think Apple will respond....in ‘19. 
    Blathering buffoonery. Everyone who owns an Apple product uses Siri at some point or other. 
    thtlordjohnwhorfindysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 70
    seankillseankill Posts: 346member
    lkrupp said:
    seankill said:
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    While I agree with the sentiment and would like to see major improvements to Siri, I also wonder how much it matters.  Most iOS users I know rarely use Siri (same goes for my Android friends and Assistant) on their phones.  I see it the most with people using Apple Watch but even then it’s mostly to send texts or set reminders (and occasionally for HomeKit).  With that in mind, would big changes to Siri even be noticed by the vast majority of iOS users?  I HOPE so but I guess it remains to be seen.

    There’s also the way voice assistants have “improved” over the years.  Apple has frequently touted Siri’s ability to pull up sports scores and stats etc., but again, I rarely see people be excited about it.  If you don’t care about sports (like me) then you’ll rarely use that feature, and if you’re INTO sports you’re likely not going to be satisfied with the limited results Siri provides or not want them (from the standpoint of not wanting to know the final score until watching the actual game).  Is all the sports stuff an improvement to Siri? Certainly. But how much to it increase engagement?  That’s what I want to know and likely never will.  But I feel like that’s where ALL virtual assistants need to improve, getting people engaged in using them.
    No one uses Siri because it sucks. It needs work and I think Apple will respond....in ‘19. 
    Blathering buffoonery. Everyone who owns an Apple product uses Siri at some point or other. 
    Sarcasm? 
    I drive on poor roads sometimes but does that make them not crap? I avoid Siri if at all possible and it generally is possible. I think Apple is well aware of the issues with Siri and is well on its way to a fix. 
  • Reply 19 of 70
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,295member
    seankill said:
    Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie)
    So much of what I’ve been hoping to see in iOS dynamic interactivity and app unbundling is being presented by Google for Android.

    Waiting to see Apple’s version. Hopefully soonish.


    Some of the things Google announces today were reallly impressive. I hope Apple really surprises everyone and wows at WWDC.
    I hope so too. Siri straight needs help.
    While I agree with the sentiment and would like to see major improvements to Siri, I also wonder how much it matters.  Most iOS users I know rarely use Siri (same goes for my Android friends and Assistant) on their phones.  I see it the most with people using Apple Watch but even then it’s mostly to send texts or set reminders (and occasionally for HomeKit).  With that in mind, would big changes to Siri even be noticed by the vast majority of iOS users?  I HOPE so but I guess it remains to be seen.

    There’s also the way voice assistants have “improved” over the years.  Apple has frequently touted Siri’s ability to pull up sports scores and stats etc., but again, I rarely see people be excited about it.  If you don’t care about sports (like me) then you’ll rarely use that feature, and if you’re INTO sports you’re likely not going to be satisfied with the limited results Siri provides or not want them (from the standpoint of not wanting to know the final score until watching the actual game).  Is all the sports stuff an improvement to Siri? Certainly. But how much to it increase engagement?  That’s what I want to know and likely never will.  But I feel like that’s where ALL virtual assistants need to improve, getting people engaged in using them.
    No one uses Siri because it sucks. It needs work and I think Apple will respond....in ‘19. 
    I use it all the time, and it works fine for most of my uses. 
    StrangeDayslolliverlordjohnwhorfinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 70
    airnerdairnerd Posts: 502member
    My household devices will share something in common with my pool...both shall remain free of P.  
    cornchipronnlolliverlordjohnwhorfinwillcropointmacxpresswatto_cobra
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