Steve Jobs changed the face of Apple and retail forever on May 15, 2001

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 46
    metrix said:
    The concept of the Apple store is still quite the same. Cook better get things going it seems like there is no "one more thing for years
    Why does it need to change? The apple stores earn more per square foot than any other company, including Tiffany. 

    As for nothing new, we've seen complete new product lines (watch, homepod) that has earned Apple billions of dollars, as well as fairly significant changes to many of their other products. 

    If you're expecting to see another runaway success story like the iPod, iPad, and iPhone, that's likely not going to happen again no matter who is running Apple. It's hard to fault Tim Cook for not being able to top those products. 
    macxpresswatto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 46
    jdgazjdgaz Posts: 247member
    All I know is that being able to walk into an apple store and discuss the ins and outs of a possible move from being a Windows family to a Mac family was what made me a fan of all things apple. Heck, helpful, knowledgable people who all seemed to have 7 or more year old computers that were running the most current operating system. That was enough for us to take the leap. Still enjoy going to the store even if I don't have a plan of buying a thing.
    tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 43 of 46
    Renaissance NerdRenaissance Nerd Posts: 3unconfirmed, member
    I never heard whether Jobs addressed the intentional destruction of all the Apple dealers while he wasn't at Apple, but the Apple Stores made me think he was the one guy at Apple (Woz was already retired) that realized it was a terrible idea. When Apple cut all their dealers throats by changing their lineup to exclude small stores, including many other policies that favored big box stores, they had a 19% market share. Over 3,000 Apple Dealers went out of business over the next eighteen months. By the time the BizMarts and CompUSAs and others went out of business a few years later, Apple market share had sunk to just above 2%, and then Jobs came back. The climb from that suicidal series of decisions is why Jobs gets so much credit; it's one of the greatest turnarounds in business history. I am still wary of anything Apple does, because I was one of those dealers. Small dealerships like mine preached Apple as much as sold it back then, and the reward for our loyalty was oblivion. Fighting the 'IBM compatible' fetish was hard work, and Apple without Jobs and Woz actually believed that just putting their computers on the shelves in bigger stores would sell more units. It didn't, and almost all of those big box retailers are gone now. I knew it would happen, because the concept was fundamentally flawed, but corporate America is all about fads. When you see a board room you should picture a bunch of swooning teeny-boppers chasing Elvis, screaming and crying to get in on the latest thing. Apple is different today for one reason: they actually value excellence over faddish conformity. That is the legacy of the Steves, and so long as they keep to it they'll continue to do well. Ever wonder why so much of the tech press hates Apple? That's it in a nutshell: Apple doesn't follow the goofy fads.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 46
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,554member
    Steve Jobs was such a great presenter. Even here he manages to tell the idea behind the store very clearly, in a simple way, enthusiastic and comes across as symphatetic.

    The old store concept seems more fun. The stores I see are sterile. Just wooded tables with products in a row. Nothing for kids, everything dedicated to show a bunch of products. 
    Wooden tables dedicated to showing a bunch of products is exactly what Jobs launched. What are you talking about?

    Take off the rose colored glasses man. Nostalgia, it’s a helluva drug. 
    watto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 45 of 46
    Steve Jobs was such a great presenter. Even here he manages to tell the idea behind the store very clearly, in a simple way, enthusiastic and comes across as symphatetic.

    The old store concept seems more fun. The stores I see are sterile. Just wooded tables with products in a row. Nothing for kids, everything dedicated to show a bunch of products. 
    Wooden tables dedicated to showing a bunch of products is exactly what Jobs launched. What are you talking about?

    Take off the rose colored glasses man. Nostalgia, it’s a helluva drug. 
    Watch the video, then walk into a local Apple Store and find out the difference. It has nothing to do with nostalgia. The brand I feel nostalgic about is Commodore, and that was the 80s and early 90s.
  • Reply 46 of 46
    ajminnjajminnj Posts: 13member


    I gotta admit when this happened my instinct was the same as King’s, realizing that the concept wasn’t necessarily new or unique. All I thought was that brick & motor was going to die and so why invest in it? Glad I was wrong and humbled by it. I used to be in sales (back in the VCR and Hi Fi days) and now realize that sales people will have their favorites, but they will also favor pushing those items that make them more money. So why not have salespeople that know about, love, use and are enthused about one brand? I guess that’s the lesson.

    Has Apple ever had to close one of their stores? 

    Other than extended maintenance (eg 5th Ave Cube) or moving to a larger nearby location (eg Lehigh Valley), I am not aware of any.
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