Apple's Everyone Can Code Swift lessons available for blind and deaf students in fall

Posted:
in iPad edited May 17
Starting in the fall, schools supporting students with vision, hearing or other assistive needs can use the Everyone Can Code curricula for Swift.

Everyone Can Code for the Blind and Deaf


"Apple's mission is to make products as accessible as possible," said Apple CEO Tim Cook in a statement about the new program. "We created Everyone Can Code because we believe all students deserve an opportunity to learn the language of technology. We hope to bring Everyone Can Code to even more schools around the world serving students with disabilities."

Apple collaborated with engineers, educators, and programmers from various accessibility communities to make Everyone Can Code as accessible as possible, and will continue to work with schools to augment the curricula as needed. Apple will provide additional tools and resources such as tactile maps to enhance the understanding of coding environments for non-visual learners.

Everybody Can Code


The first round of schools to implement the program are the California School for the Blind, the California School for the Deaf, District 75 in New York, Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, the Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the Perkins School for the Blind, the Texas School for the Blind and visually Impaired, and the Texas School for the Deaf.

"Our students were tremendously excited at our first Everyone Can Code session earlier this year," said Bill Daugherty, superintendent at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Austin. "There are more than 10,400 students with visual impairments in Texas, and the development of this curricula is going to be a big step in opening up coding opportunities for our students and those across the nation."

The iPad and Everyone Can Code can also be used by students with physical motor limitations through Apple's built in Switch Control, in conjunction with VoiceOver. The technology enables switches, joysticks and other adaptive devices to control what is on the screen.

Apple's Everyone Can Code was designed by Apple engineers in tandem with educators, and is meant to entrench Swift as a platform. Although it can be used on Linux, Swift is mostly Apple-centric, meant to build apps for macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.

On March 7, Apple held its first session for visually impaired students at the Texas School for the Blind. As part of the educational session, a team of Apple engineers led the session, and taught students how to write code on an iPad using iOS accessibility features like VoiceOver.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    asciiascii Posts: 5,838member
    I think deaf people should make their own programming language. I love how clever they are with sign language and would like to see a programming language with the same kind of quirkiness.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,875member
    My hat is off to any and all programmers. It’s a grueling, mind-numbing, often thankless job.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Hey, by the way I graduated from Texas School for the Deaf in Austin, Texas! I graduated there in 1999. Texas School for the Deaf established in 1856. It’s the oldest public school that is still in operation in Texas.  :smile: Oh and the entire campus (78 acres) is using Apple computers as their computer system and they love it. Apple is in business with Texas School for the Deaf for over 20 years. 
    edited May 17 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 4 of 14
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,711member
    ascii said:
    I think deaf people should make their own programming language. I love how clever they are with sign language and would like to see a programming language with the same kind of quirkiness.
    Quirkiness is exactly why Apple is getting rid of ObjC in favor of Swift. Deaf people don't need a different programming language. Perhaps some visual alerts in Playgrounds to notify of audio events might be helpful.

    Programming blind is really difficult, but I have a friend who is a blind programmer. I'm also a programmer. I work mostly in visual media. I once told my friend that it would be better to be deaf than blind because I could still do my job. He replied: "Being deaf is extremely alienating. Being blind is no big deal. I can carry on a conversation with people and if on the phone the other person doesn't even know I'm blind. About the only thing I can't do is drive a car." Although many blind people say iPhone is the best, my friend isn't that enthusiast although that is the phone he uses, however he is always complaining about its shortcomings. Mostly his complaints are quite legitimate. I told him he should share his experiences with Apple. He said Apple should have asked him for input while developing the phone since he has been developing apps for the blind since the 1980s.
  • Reply 5 of 14
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 289member
    What if the student is both blind and deaf?
  • Reply 6 of 14
    @viclauyyc , the deaf blind is the same thing as deaf person and blind person individually. I have a best friend who is deaf and blind. She can do photography, IT, codes, all of stuff that all hearing can. She’s legally blind. She become deaf and blind when her mother got hit with Rubella. She and I graduated together at Texas School for the Deaf in 1999.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,178member
    I genuinely hate Swift.
  • Reply 8 of 14
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,711member
    I genuinely hate Swift.
    Can you explain what you dislike?
  • Reply 9 of 14
    asciiascii Posts: 5,838member
    volcan said:
    ascii said:
    I think deaf people should make their own programming language. I love how clever they are with sign language and would like to see a programming language with the same kind of quirkiness.
    Quirkiness is exactly why Apple is getting rid of ObjC in favor of Swift. Deaf people don't need a different programming language. Perhaps some visual alerts in Playgrounds to notify of audio events might be helpful.

    I would just like to see what they came up with that's all.

    Re: Swift, I think the main design goal of a programming language should be to allow the programmer to cleanly express solutions to problems, and everything else should be secondary to that. It seems like the design goals of Swift were to be compatible with Cocoa, to produce performant code, and make life easy for the compiler writer, and the programmer be damned. Programming in Swift is like trying to sweet talk a girl in German.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,711member
    ascii said:

    Re: Swift, I think the main design goal of a programming language should be to allow the programmer to cleanly express solutions to problems, and everything else should be secondary to that. It seems like the design goals of Swift were to be compatible with Cocoa, to produce performant code, and make life easy for the compiler writer, and the programmer be damned. Programming in Swift is like trying to sweet talk a girl in German.
    Apple's compiler is actually based on open source from LLVM.org and also includes Clang and GCC, the latter being the Linux standard C compiler so Swift's design has nothing to do with making life easier for the compiler writers, in fact the inverse is true. Swift was designed to be compatible with the most modern compiler tools available. The complier preceded Swift. Apple licensed LLVM in 2005 and Swift was announced in 2014.

    Like any language, Swift has a learning curve, but it depends on what programming environment you are coming from as to how difficult that might be. If you are familiar with typical script type programming, Swift has a lot of similarities. Swift is going to replace Object-C. Get used to it.

  • Reply 11 of 14
    asciiascii Posts: 5,838member
    volcan said:
    ascii said:

    Re: Swift, I think the main design goal of a programming language should be to allow the programmer to cleanly express solutions to problems, and everything else should be secondary to that. It seems like the design goals of Swift were to be compatible with Cocoa, to produce performant code, and make life easy for the compiler writer, and the programmer be damned. Programming in Swift is like trying to sweet talk a girl in German.
    Apple's compiler is actually based on open source from LLVM.org and also includes Clang and GCC, the latter being the Linux standard C compiler so Swift's design has nothing to do with making life easier for the compiler writers, in fact the inverse is true. Swift was designed to be compatible with the most modern compiler tools available. The complier preceded Swift. Apple licensed LLVM in 2005 and Swift was announced in 2014.

    Like any language, Swift has a learning curve, but it depends on what programming environment you are coming from as to how difficult that might be. If you are familiar with typical script type programming, Swift has a lot of similarities. Swift is going to replace Object-C. Get used to it.

    I'm sure the LLVM modular compiler preceded the design of Swift, but the actual Swift swift module for it can't have. I was saying the syntax of the language was designed to make it easy to compile rather than easy to express solutions to problems with. But each to his own. It's definitely a very modern language, that stands out when you look at it, and Apple surely intends it to replace ObjC, I just perceive it as having messed up design priorities. But again everyone has different tastes I guess.
  • Reply 12 of 14
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,875member
    I genuinely hate Swift.
    But Swift loves you.  <3


    edited May 18
  • Reply 13 of 14
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 289member
    @viclauyyc , the deaf blind is the same thing as deaf person and blind person individually. I have a best friend who is deaf and blind. She can do photography, IT, codes, all of stuff that all hearing can. She’s legally blind. She become deaf and blind when her mother got hit with Rubella. She and I graduated together at Texas School for the Deaf in 1999.
    Just curious, how people communicate with her? 

    Maybe not her case, if a person is 100% blind and deaf, I think it is pretty hard to communicate freely in nature setting.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    We love this Apple program! We have deaf and blind students in Utah who love stem and coding. Who do we contact to participate? 
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