Starbucks' nationwide bias training will use iPads

Posted:
in iPad edited May 26
"Designated iPads" will be part of May 29 training at more than 8,000 Starbucks locations nationwide.

Starbucks founder Howard Schultz


Shortly after the early April arrest of two African-American men who were waiting to meet a business partner in a Philadelphia Starbucks location made nationwide headlines, the company announced plans to close all of its U.S. stores for a day in order to hold "racial bias training" for all 175,000 of its employees, on May 29. That training will incorporate iPads.

Starbucks will use "designated iPads" in the training, featuring a series of videos that will play on the devices, USA Today reported on Thursday. In a video posted on Starbucks' website, company founder and chairman Howard Schultz is seen addressing employees from an iPad screen.

A MacBook is also seen elsewhere in the video, on a table in front of one of the trainers, Alexis McGill Johnson of the Perception Institute.

A Starbucks storefront


According to social media chatter, it appears that Starbucks has purchased a large number of iPads for its stores, specifically for the purposes of the training. A thread on the Starbucks subreddit stated that the company's stores have received two or more iPads, or perhaps as many as five, ahead of the training. Meanwhile multiple Starbucks employees, on Twitter, have stated that their store received two, three, or five iPads for the training, with some of those employees complaining that the company spent that money on the iPads rather than on employee raises or new hires.

It's unclear exactly how many iPads Starbucks bought, what they will be used for after the training, or what type of special deal, if any, the company made with Apple. When AppleInsider reached out to Starbucks for comment, a spokesperson told us that "we'll have more to share next week. Starbucks Newsroom will serve as the main hub for information, content, and assets related to the trainings."

Starbucks' App Store is so popular that it now has more users than Apple Pay, according to a recently released survey.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    macseekermacseeker Posts: 361member
    Thanks.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 30
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 530member
    Wow.
  • Reply 3 of 30
    nunzynunzy Posts: 332member
    This makes sense. Starbucks knows quality. They sell the world's best coffee, and so they need the worlds best technology.
    claire1racerhomie3
  • Reply 4 of 30
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,054member
    nunzy said:
    This makes sense. Starbucks knows quality. They sell the world's best coffee, and so they need the worlds best technology.
    I remember for the Sydney Olympics the CNN crew stupidly made a big deal about bringing a massive supply of Starbucks coffee beans with them as they could not be sure they could get good coffee outside of USA. The crew were treated with contempt and derision, and given a very hard time for their idea of what made good coffee.

    Incidently Starbucks has not done very well In Australia because it is considered too weak and gauche compared with local product, where a variety of smaller, local roasters selling through shops and chains hold sway. Mum and dad coffee shops seem to do better than franchises. Much more variety, which is unusual and interesting when you consider the lack of options and variety of things we usually have in comparison with the USA.

    And who puts flavouring in their coffee? Americans can be such Philistines!
    edited May 26 nunzyadamcracerhomie3toysandmejmc54watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 30
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,143member
    entropys said:
    And who puts flavouring in their coffee? Americans can be such Philistines!
    If you knew the kind of crap that passes for coffee over here, you’d flavor it, too. And I don’t even drink the stuff. I just like the smell. OF GOOD COFFEE. Brand name garbage doesn’t even smell good, much less taste like anything other than liquid burnt.
    cgWerksnunzyallmypeopleanton zuykovjmc54watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 30
    freshmakerfreshmaker Posts: 510member
    I like the Frappuccino’s at Starbucks but just can’t get into their coffee.  It all tastes burnt to me :neutral:.  Prefer Chick-fil-A and Dunking Donuts for fast food coffee, but usually I drink  Kona 
    cgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 30
    apmkeapmke Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Nice to hear Starbucks will at least be wasting its employees’ time while using Apple’s superior mobile devices.
    racerhomie3toysandmemonstrosityrazorpitpatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 30
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,373member
    Well, that's one way to get more iPads in use, I suppose. The research seems to indicate that such training is useless, or worse, tends to backfire... but it's probably of value in terms of PR.

    entropys said:
    I remember for the Sydney Olympics the CNN crew stupidly made a big deal about bringing a massive supply of Starbucks coffee beans with them as they could not be sure they could get good coffee outside of USA. The crew were treated with contempt and derision, and given a very hard time for their idea of what made good coffee.
    Paid for by Starbucks? (i.e.: native advertising, maybe?)

    entropys said:
    And who puts flavouring in their coffee? Americans can be such Philistines!
    If you knew the kind of crap that passes for coffee over here, you’d flavor it, too. And I don’t even drink the stuff. I just like the smell. OF GOOD COFFEE. Brand name garbage doesn’t even smell good, much less taste like anything other than liquid burnt.
    LOL, no doubt! While I suppose, like wine, this is somewhat subjective, I can't stand Starbuck's coffee. Of the big chains, I actually think I like McDonald's the best. But, if you ever get the chance and run across someone from the Middle East, have them make you some Turkish coffee. I've been forever ruined trying to get anything close after that.

    I like the Frappuccino’s at Starbucks but just can’t get into their coffee.  It all tastes burnt to me :neutral:.  Prefer Chick-fil-A and Dunking Donuts for fast food coffee, but usually I drink  Kona 
    Yea, if I ever end up there, I order something else. As I said above, to each their own I guess. Some people seem to like it. People I've known who have run coffee shops or have been involved in coffee often don't think that highly of it either, but maybe that's a conflict of interest. :)

    My current favorite is actually (amazingly to me) some instant stuff from Four Sigmatic that has Lion's Mane and Chaga mushroom extract in it. It doesn't leave me with caffeine jitters, the acidity is neutralized, and it's really good for me, too. Plus, it tastes about as good as anything I can quickly and readily get. Previously, it has been Nabob Midnight Eclipse from the grocery store (not sure if available outside Canada, it's a Vancouver company owned by Kraft) via a French Press.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 9 of 30
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,143member
    I suppose they could’ve printed out the training, which might fit on one page.
    Or they could just copy and paste Google’s new code of conduct (no, not the one that erases “Don’t be evil”, the other one) which is disturbing and terrifying for reasons outside the scope of this thread. It seems in line with what Starbucks would like, at least.
    cgWerksSpamSandwichallmypeopleentropysanton zuykovrazorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 30
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,373member
    tallest skil said:
    ... no, not the one that erases “Don’t be evil”, the other one ...
    You're lucky I wasn't drinking anything when I read that. :)
    razorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 30
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 328member
    nunzy said:
    This makes sense. Starbucks knows quality. They sell the world's best coffee, and so they need the worlds best technology.
    You are kidding, right? World’s best coffee? That crap can’t even be called coffee. 
    cgWerksanton zuykovgeorgie01razorpitnunzywatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 30
    asciiascii Posts: 5,634member
    People get their values from a lifetime. Whether that's being raised by caring moral parents, or going to church/temple/mosque, or just finding your own values in life through reading the books of wise people. The idea that you can give people a corporate training course in the form of an app that will change their values, whaaaaaat?
    entropystallest skilgeorgie01razorpit
  • Reply 13 of 30
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,373member
    ascii said:
    People get their values from a lifetime. Whether that's being raised by caring moral parents, or going to church/temple/mosque, or just finding your own values in life through reading the books of wise people. The idea that you can give people a corporate training course in the form of an app that will change their values, whaaaaaat?
    Well, a start would be fixing the 'science' on race to begin with. While one people group distrusting or disliking another people group is probably about as old as humanity, the Darwinian nonsense of race really kicked off the 'scientific' credibility for some to think themselves superior to another. But yes, some world-views and upbringings fare better than others on this stuff, and it's pretty hard to just correct with corporate course. (And, the studies seem to show it ineffective to problematic.)
  • Reply 14 of 30
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 782member
    Bias training so that barristers won't say a thing if non-paying customers sit for hours at the expense of paying customers who can't find any empty seats. That said, using an iPad for training purposes is always a good idea.
    edited May 27 anton zuykovtallest skilrazorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 30
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,616member
    bluefire1 said:
    Bias training so that barristers won't say a thing if non-paying customers sit for hours at the expense of paying customers who can't find any empty seats. That said, using an iPad for training purposes is always a good idea.
    I think you mean “baristas”. If barristers served coffee at Starbucks then it would cost £1000 per cup and would come with six hundred pages of legal briefs. 

    The problem wasnt that the men were sitting for hours without buying what Starbucks laughingly calls coffee. The problem was that the men were treated differently to white customers who were doing the same thing. 

    If I am waiting for someone at a Cafe Nero, then I won’t order until they arrive. This seems like a very common practice to me. The men were telling the truth here because the person they were waiting for arrived as they were being led away in cuffs. 

    As some one of the other customers in this case pointed out, a white  man came in and was allowing we’d to use the bathroom without buying anything. The two black men were not, even though they said they were waiting for a friend before ordering. Furthermore, there were other white folk who had been there for some time without ordering. None of them were arrested. 

    Unusually, the men did not sue Starbucks for millions. They accepted an apology, $1 in compensation, and a $200,000 donation to a local Entrepreneurs Fund (the fund is not theirs). 
    dewmemwhitecgWerksfastasleepjmc54
  • Reply 16 of 30
    allmypeopleallmypeople Posts: 329member
    bias training. lol all over the place
    tallest skilgeorgie01razorpit
  • Reply 17 of 30
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,266member
    bluefire1 said:
    Bias training so that barristers won't say a thing if non-paying customers sit for hours at the expense of paying customers who can't find any empty seats. That said, using an iPad for training purposes is always a good idea.
    And iPads can also be used to beat the employees into submission.
    mwhiterazorpit
  • Reply 18 of 30
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,054member
    All you people criticising bias training as ineffective miss the point. This kind of training is a political statement and signal of Starbucks’ virtue. Look how much free advertising it’s getting. That they are buying iPads to do it just means more media attention. Cheap! They don’t care if the only thing a worker learns is not to get Starbucks into trouble.  

    My work has a similar, anti domestic violence campaign. Clearly a major political campaign.  It’s bigger than Ben Hur! There is unconscious bias training, compulsory surveys where it is clear what answers are expected (men are clearly ‘orrible people as a rule), and a public media campaign! I guess it’s so easy to do this with Other Peoples’ Money.

    And the worst is it is expected people, at the very least all managers, wear a white ribbon. A stylised white ribbon made into a gold edged badge.  I was at an all exec meeting the other day (about eighty people) and I was just about the only one not wearing the ribbon badge.  I just said “I’m just like Kramer, I don’t want to wear the ribbon”.  It was a bit scary to tell the truth. I felt just like an aristocrat must have felt fronting up to the Committee of Public Safety back in revolutionary France. I was the other. Some people thought I was crazy, especially those on the make, some thought I was painting a target on my back. Most said nothing, some maybe wondering if I was a wife basher, others maybe looked a little shamefaced. I was wondering if someone would stand up to denounce me.

    I don’t expect a promotion under current management.
    edited May 27 anton zuykovtallest skilcgWerksgeorgie01SpamSandwich
  • Reply 19 of 30
    bluefire1 said:
    Bias training so that barristers won't say a thing if non-paying customers sit for hours at the expense of paying customers who can't find any empty seats. That said, using an iPad for training purposes is always a good idea.
    Yeah, that policy will bite the top management in the arse in no time! Once, sales start to slip, they will have to add all sorts of "but"s to that policy, effectively eliminating the policy while saving their face.
    SpamSandwichrazorpit
  • Reply 20 of 30
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,334member
    A couple hours of awareness training using iPads or whiteboards or whatever isn't going to lead to widespread change in belief systems that have been indoctrinated into once-pliable minds since birth, repeatedly nurtured during formative years, constantly reenforced by subtle and not-so-subtle stimulus from peers and public influencers, and finally cast in stone by open scapegoating, resentment, and tribalism. But if only a handful of the truly empathetic participants (there's bound to be a few in there) take a moment to reflect on the forces that have driven their unconscious bias and take personal steps to break the cycle and train their minds to respond differently - it will be worth the time investment. Whether they are using iPads is completely immaterial to this matter. 
This discussion has been closed.