Video: iPhone X vs OnePlus 6 - Benchmarks

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 30
Out of the box, we were really impressed with the feel of OnePlus' most expensive device to date. The latest iteration is inexpensively priced compared to the iPhone X, starting at just $529, and comes with a pre-applied screen protector, a case, and a fast charger.





Hardware

The OnePlus 6 used in our testing process is priced at $579, slightly higher than the base $529 base model. For that extra money, we get bumps in RAM from 6GB to 8GB, and flash storage from 64GB to 128GB. The iPhone X we are comparing it to is the base $999 model with 3GB of RAM and 64GB of storage.

For the price, the OnePlus 6 packs some serious value. The mid-tier OnePlus 6 sports the same high-end Qualcomm 845 processor that's included in the Galaxy S9 for almost $200 less. It's an eight-core CPU that consists of four efficiency cores and four performance cores, running at up-to 2.8Ghz. In comparison, the iPhone X has a six-core processor that contains four efficiency cores and two high-performance cores running up-to a slightly lower speed of 2.39Ghz.

OnePlus 6


In terms of graphics hardware, the iPhone X sports an Apple-designed three-core GPU, and the OnePlus uses an Adreno 630 GPU -- 30 percent faster than the previous model's 540.

One of the main spec differences between the iPhone X and the One Plus is the amount of RAM included. The iPhone X comes with just 3GB of RAM, less than half as much as the class-leading OnePlus 6. Apple's operating system is very efficient, but even with Android being a more RAM hungry operating system the One Plus can edge out the iPhone X in responsiveness when there are a lot of apps open.

Benchmarks

Starting off with Geekbench 4, the iPhone X completely destroys the OnePlus in single core performance. The One Plus' multi-core score comes closer to the iPhone than any other Android device we've tested, but the iPhone X is still about 15% faster overall. Next up is the Geekbench 4 graphics test, where the OnePlus 6 scores impressively close to the iPhone X.

Geekbench


Moving onto the AnTuTu benchmark, the OnePlus manages to beat out the iPhone X by almost 30%. AnTuTu's HTML 5 test crowned the iPhone X the winner, but not by much.

Antutu


We also tested GFXBench's OpenGL Manhattan Offscreen test at 1080p to avoid resolution differences. Here we can see the iPhone X is a fair bit ahead.

GFX


In Octane 2.0, another browser benchmark, the iPhone X floors the OnePlus, likely thanks to Safari optimizations.

Octane

Impressions

Looking at all of these benchmarks, the OnePlus 6 does an impressive job of keeping up with the iPhone X, even though it comes in at about half the price.In real-world use we were surprised by how smooth and responsive the One Plus 6 feels. In a lot of places it even feels quicker than the iPhone X. Part of that is faster animations, but we also noticed some apps launching noticeably faster.

We were also impressed with how fast its facial unlock feature works. It may not be as secure as Face ID, but it was quick enough that we typically didn't even see the lock screen before it was unlocked and ready.

With high-end CPU's and a boatload of RAM, the latest Android devices are no longer the slow glitchy devices that we've tested in the past. Of course, benchmark performance doesn't tell the whole story, so in the coming days we'll be doing more real-world comparisons between the OnePlus 6 and the iPhone X -- with part two discussing photo quality differences between the iPhone X and OnePlus 6.

Let us know in the comments what you would like to see.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 101
    berndogberndog Posts: 56member
    How much bloatware do you get for the $400 savings and can the device run with only 64GB of storage? Also what are OnePlus’ sales volume and customer satisfaction ratings?
    magman1979olsMuntzcornchippscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 101
    I don't give a rat's rear end about benchmarks. All I care about is how well my devices work. Do they perform the functions properly and quickly? We see these stories comparing iOS devices and Macs with other products all the time, and none of them matter to me. Just because another phone is faster than an iPhone on some benchmark makes no difference to me. All I care about is the user experience. It's the same with a Mac. I don't care if Dell is making laptops that are faster than my MacBook Pro. Windows is the thing that makes me not want to buy the Dell. Regular consumers don't give a crap about benchmarks.
    mwhiteAvieshekmagman1979olsmejsricMuntzradarthekat[Deleted User]redgeminipapropod
  • Reply 3 of 101
    In a nutshell: throwing a lot more cores and RAM at Android does a reasonable job at hiding the inherent problems in the OS, but is probably a really bad way to do business in the long run.
    magman1979olstmayradarthekatclaire1[Deleted User]redgeminiparaoulduke42watto_cobrahowieisaacks
  • Reply 4 of 101
    stevenozstevenoz Posts: 207member
    The best thing about the OnePlus 6, for most of the people logging-into this website, is that competition is good.

    Every company needs to have some competition to keep on their game. And I'm sure a lot of non-Apple users will buy the OnePlus 6 and be happy with it.

    Luckily for Apple, they have a ecosystem for their devices that making investing outside it daunting. But nothing is forever. 


    aylkavon b7AvieshekradarthekatCheeseFreezeraoulduke42watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 101
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,403member
    You know what? Only techie bullshit artists care about benchmarks.
    Avieshekmagman1979olsericthehalfbeeMuntzcornchipgatorguyradarthekatwatto_cobrahowieisaacks
  • Reply 6 of 101
    KITAKITA Posts: 140member
    We also tested GFXBench's OpenGL Manhattan Offscreen test at 1080p to avoid resolution differences. Here we can see the iPhone X is a fair bit ahead.

    GFX

    Something is really wrong with the graphics test.

    In GFXBench 1080p Manhattan 3.1 Offscreen results section, a Snapdragon 845 phone will score ~60 Fps, while the iPhone X only scores ~43 Fps.

    According to the 3DMark results website, a Snapdragon 845 device will score ~5000 in the Sling Shot Extreme Unlimited test, while the iPhone X scores ~3200.
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 101
    georgie01georgie01 Posts: 179member
    lkrupp said:
    You know what? Only techie bullshit artists care about benchmarks.
    Maybe a more accurate way to say that is ‘Only tech-minded people care about benchmarks’. It’s naive to dismiss benchmarks and is it also naive to dismiss ‘real life’ app-switching tests. Both are synthetic and stretch the limits and therefore do not usually reflect actual real usage scenarios, but they are interesting if not always useful. The only useful tests are ones that show actual time savings for an average user—for instance, being able to switch through 20 apps faster than other phones is nearly useless, but being able to export a video in half the time does translate to real time savings.
    coolfactorradarthekatAnilu_777
  • Reply 8 of 101
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,329member
    Nice if one wants to save some money, especially now that there's little to no phone subsidies being offered, but in the end it's still Android and I don't trust Android's security.   Even if it's safe from hacking, I don't want Google monitoring me and collecting my data.  

    Having said that and even though I don't think they're sold in the U.S., I'd love to see a comparison of the OPPO phone to the iPhone. 
    MuntzcoolfactorAnilu_777tokyojimuwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 101
    Moving onto the AnTuTu benchmark, the OnePlus manages to beat out the iPhone X by almost 30%. 
    Eh..What? OnePlus has 34.6k, while iPhoneX has 37.5k in AnTuTu, no?
    Am I missing something? 34.6k is not 30% larger than 37.5k. It just isn't!
    edited May 27 cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 101
    KITAKITA Posts: 140member
    Moving onto the AnTuTu benchmark, the OnePlus manages to beat out the iPhone X by almost 30%. 
    Eh..What? OnePlus has 34.6k, while iPhoneX has 37.5k in AnTuTu, no?
    Am I missing something? 34.6k is not 30% larger than 37.5k. It just isn't!
    They're just being misleading. The picture is only showing the results from one part of the Antutu benchmark where the iPhone X wins. The iPhone X loses for every other section (presumably), hence the 30% lead for the OnePlus 6 in the final result.
    cornchip
  • Reply 11 of 101
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    I love the size of the notch on the One Plus 6. I would love for Apple to be able to shrink their Face ID and other components so that more of the Status Bar can display usable data with the next iPhone launch. 
    Anilu_777flashfan207
  • Reply 12 of 101
    shrave10shrave10 Posts: 15member
    Is there a benchmark for measuring how fast the OnePlus ships your personal data to China vs. iPhone?
    coolfactorcornchipradarthekatflashfan207metrixwatto_cobraAlexandre Leboucher
  • Reply 13 of 101
    The one thing that never gets discussed is the companies behind these products. 

    Where do you go for support? The company or the carrier?
    How does a Android phone manufacturer support the OS or does it?
    Who repairs the device if it gets broken?
    What kind of turn around time is a repair and how long is the warranty on the repair?
    How long is the warranty and what about coverage for accidental or liquid damage?

    If you have to go thru your carrier for support then no way is it worth it, even if it was a free phone.
     I wouldn't want to pay a deductible to get a rebuilt device with 3rd party parts that might fail prematurely and then I have to pay another deductible to get it replaced again. 

    With all of the efforts on the right to repair your own device being advertised, no one talks about how, in general, you never see a manufacturer authorized repair place for Android phones. You either take it to a quickie repair place or send it somewhere and wait for it to be fixed or worse, pay the carrier to give you someone else's broken device that was refurbished.

    Some might argue that Apple does that when they replace your phone. Not true. Apple gives you a rebuilt device (by Apple) or a new device.
    Apple doesn't care since both are from them and they are the manufacturer, so no 3rd party parts.   A refurbished device from your carrier comes from a 3rd party that takes broken or liquid damaged devices and rebuilds them with non OEM parts. 


    Anilu_777raoulduke42anonconformistwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 101
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 3,734member
    Thanks for not doing one of those stupid App races (that everyone on YouTube always does). The most useless test ever conceived, no doubt to give Android phones somewhere to claim victory.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 101
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,283member
    Moving onto the AnTuTu benchmark, the OnePlus manages to beat out the iPhone X by almost 30%. 
    Eh..What? OnePlus has 34.6k, while iPhoneX has 37.5k in AnTuTu, no?
    Am I missing something? 34.6k is not 30% larger than 37.5k. It just isn't!
    KITA said:
    Moving onto the AnTuTu benchmark, the OnePlus manages to beat out the iPhone X by almost 30%. 
    Eh..What? OnePlus has 34.6k, while iPhoneX has 37.5k in AnTuTu, no?
    Am I missing something? 34.6k is not 30% larger than 37.5k. It just isn't!
    They're just being misleading. The picture is only showing the results from one part of the Antutu benchmark where the iPhone X wins. The iPhone X loses for every other section (presumably), hence the 30% lead for the OnePlus 6 in the final result.

    Yah, I was wondering the same thing... some clarification or correction needed.
  • Reply 16 of 101
    tylersdadtylersdad Posts: 136member
    Thanks for not doing one of those stupid App races (that everyone on YouTube always does). The most useless test ever conceived, no doubt to give Android phones somewhere to claim victory.
    I’m not sure why you believe those tests are useless. It’s nice to see how responsive a phone is in comparison to other phones. 
  • Reply 17 of 101
    At the first sentence I wondered if this testing was originally done with the base OnePlus model and upon discovering that model didn’t turn out well in comparison to the base iPhone X model the upgraded model was used and written about. Apple Insider, please confirm or deny my curiosity. If confirmed, please explain why you chose to portray the OnePlus in a better light and iPhone in a less flattering light. 

    Edit: At the first sentence of the second paragraph, I wondered... 😉
    edited May 27 watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 101
    Instead of Benchmark, what about a video conversion or something that will use the CPU enough to see if there is CPU Throttling.
    radarthekatanonconformistwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 101
    tylersdad said:
    Thanks for not doing one of those stupid App races (that everyone on YouTube always does). The most useless test ever conceived, no doubt to give Android phones somewhere to claim victory.
    I’m not sure why you believe those tests are useless. It’s nice to see how responsive a phone is in comparison to other phones. 

    They don’t simulate anything approaching real-life usage.

    - Nobody launches an App and then immediately exits/switches to another App as soon as the main screen comes up. The normal use is to actually do something within the App.
    - Nobody launches multiple CPU/RAM/GPU intensive games and randomly switches between them. People normally play a single game for some time.
    - Nobody switches constantly between 20 Apps. (there have been studies on this). Most people have around 10 Apps they use multiple times per day (email, messaging, browser and social Apps) and perhaps another 20 they use a few times a week.
    - Nobody switches numerous Apps continuously. Typically people do something on their phone, then it goes to sleep until something comes up (you get a text or call, or need to make one yourself). This is why mobile OSes are always quick to suspend Apps not doing anything and are also quick to turn off the screen and sleep when not being used.

    They are so far away from real-life usage scenarios it’s actually pathetic people make these videos in the first place.
    lkruppradarthekatAnilu_777chiaanonconformistrandominternetpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 101
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,403member
    georgie01 said:
    lkrupp said:
    You know what? Only techie bullshit artists care about benchmarks.
    Maybe a more accurate way to say that is ‘Only tech-minded people care about benchmarks’. It’s naive to dismiss benchmarks and is it also naive to dismiss ‘real life’ app-switching tests. Both are synthetic and stretch the limits and therefore do not usually reflect actual real usage scenarios, but they are interesting if not always useful. The only useful tests are ones that show actual time savings for an average user—for instance, being able to switch through 20 apps faster than other phones is nearly useless, but being able to export a video in half the time does translate to real time savings.
    Normal people don’t switch between 20 apps and wouldn’t care about the few milliseconds difference anyway. My original position remains.
    muthuk_vanalingamchiawatto_cobra
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