Siri used to summon medical assistance after serious motorcycle crash

Posted:
in General Discussion
17-year-old used Siri to make an emergency call after a motorcycle crash.

An Apple Siri presentation


After numerous reports in recent months of lives being saved all over the world due to the Apple Watch noticing users' serious medical conditions, it now appears another piece of Apple technology has come in handy for someone in a bad spot.

According to a report this week in the Sydney Morning Herald, a 17-year-old in New South Wales, Australia used Siri on his iPhone to summon medical assistance following a serious motorbike accident.

Darcy McKay, on May 17, crashed his bike on a bush track, suffering multiple fractures to his vertebrae, a fractured tail bone, a broken pelvis bone and even bleeding from the pancreas. After the crash, unable to move, McKay asked Siri on his iPhone to call triple zero -- the Australian equivalent of 911 -- and emergency services arrived 20 minutes later.

"I am so happy I thought of using [Siri], otherwise I would have been stuffed," McKay told the newspaper. He encouraged others to make sure to activist Siri on their phones.

"If a situation like that happens, you need Siri. So people should really have it set up on their phone otherwise you can't use it," he told the Herald.

The report arrives at a time when Siri's value and utility has been questioned, especially in relationship to Amazon's Alexa and other competitors. A March piece on the tech website The Information detailed years of infighting and other dysfunction within Apple's Siri teams.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    LatkoLatko Posts: 122member
    Thanks for reminding me of the ONE moment I would NEVER use Siri
  • Reply 2 of 15
    while admirable and a great life-saving feature. From my own experiences with Siri, if I was ever in the same situation...

    Me -Hey Siri, call 999!
    Siri -Let me think about that...
    Siri -OK, here's what I found for "colin mine find"
    Me -wtf

    3 or 4 attempts later and a few extra pints of blood lost, it works.  :sweat_smile: :trollface: 

    granted, it's maybe easier to tailor speech recognition in places where most of the country sound the same (Australia, US etc.) in the UK there are countless dialects and accents to deal with that vary so wildly.
  • Reply 3 of 15
    crossladcrosslad Posts: 461member
    adm1 said:
    while admirable and a great life-saving feature. From my own experiences with Siri, if I was ever in the same situation...

    Me -Hey Siri, call 999!
    Siri -Let me think about that...
    Siri -OK, here's what I found for "colin mine find"
    Me -wtf

    3 or 4 attempts later and a few extra pints of blood lost, it works.  :sweat_smile: :trollface: 

    granted, it's maybe easier to tailor speech recognition in places where most of the country sound the same (Australia, US etc.) in the UK there are countless dialects and accents to deal with that vary so wildly.
    And yet Siri still manages to understand my broad Derbyshire accent as well as any of the other assistants. 
    Cesar Battistini Mazieromagman1979macseekerclaire1watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Person: Alexa, I can't move! Call 911!!
    Alexa: {evil laughter}
    Alexa: ...
    edited May 28 charlesgrescgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 15
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    I was just testing this with my Watch yesterday to get some practice with the two options available, Siri and the long press of the side button plus slide of the Emergency SOS option. I hope I never have to use it, but I'm glad it's an option.

    adm1 said:
    while admirable and a great life-saving feature. From my own experiences with Siri, if I was ever in the same situation...

    Me -Hey Siri, call 999!
    Siri -Let me think about that...
    Siri -OK, here's what I found for "colin mine find"
    Me -wtf

    3 or 4 attempts later and a few extra pints of blood lost, it works.  :sweat_smile: :trollface: 

    granted, it's maybe easier to tailor speech recognition in places where most of the country sound the same (Australia, US etc.) in the UK there are countless dialects and accents to deal with that vary so wildly.
    If having Siri understand 9-9-9 is an issue, you can set up a contact with that phone number but with a contact name that Siri will understand.
    jony0jbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 15
    "I am so happy I thought of using [Siri], otherwise I would have been stuffed," McKay told the newspaper.
    “Hey Siri, call the nearest taxidermist!” - Darcy McKay’s dad. 
    anton zuykov
  • Reply 7 of 15
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,262member
    With all the damage to his body, he was lucky the phone was not destroyed. This could have ended badly for him. Thus the reason you do not dirt bike alone.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 8 of 15
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    maestro64 said:
    With all the damage to his body, he was lucky the phone was not destroyed. This could have ended badly for him. Thus the reason you do not dirt bike alone.
    Now that we have wrist-worn devices with cellular, GPS, and HR monitors. How about a device that will call a contact or emergency services after x-seconds/minutes if no HR is detected if you don't input your code, which will tell it you've purposely removed it from your person?
  • Reply 9 of 15
    nomadmacnomadmac Posts: 95member
    While I have your attention, please enable and populate the Health app on your iPhone. Many don't know that emergency responders can access your health, ID and emergency contact information from a locked screen. Apple has done a piss-poor job of letting people know about the Health app's life saving ability. Bad Apple. I literally have gone into fire houses to inform them of this fantastic capability.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 15
    asciiascii Posts: 5,838member
    It says he couldn't move his legs but could still wiggle his toes, sounds like he was lucky to not be paralysed!
    dysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 15
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 289member
    Steve would be proud 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 15
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,262member
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:
    With all the damage to his body, he was lucky the phone was not destroyed. This could have ended badly for him. Thus the reason you do not dirt bike alone.
    Now that we have wrist-worn devices with cellular, GPS, and HR monitors. How about a device that will call a contact or emergency services after x-seconds/minutes if no HR is detected if you don't input your code, which will tell it you've purposely removed it from your person?

    Because the device maybe destroyed in the accident, you think Apple wants the liability of someone thinking the watch will saving them when HR is gone or in some bad state. You know how many things could go wrong.
    dysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 15
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    maestro64 said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:
    With all the damage to his body, he was lucky the phone was not destroyed. This could have ended badly for him. Thus the reason you do not dirt bike alone.
    Now that we have wrist-worn devices with cellular, GPS, and HR monitors. How about a device that will call a contact or emergency services after x-seconds/minutes if no HR is detected if you don't input your code, which will tell it you've purposely removed it from your person?
    Because the device maybe destroyed in the accident, you think Apple wants the liability of someone thinking the watch will saving them when HR is gone or in some bad state. You know how many things could go wrong.
    1) Such a device would have to be hardened, which includes both the durability of the strap and the strap from coming unbuckled with sufficient force.

    2) I didn't once consider Apple in my statement since we're not talking a personal computing device, but one specifically as a medical device that alerts someone when you can't.

    3) The problem with cellular as the communication option is that lot of places you may want to use it for safety have no cell towers in range. The current lot of personal locater beacons seem to require the wearer to actively alert authorities so it can upload your coordinates and details to a satellite. If you are unconscious you can't activate it. Then there's the issue of these devices typically not being wearable which could add to their likelihood of being lost to one that is attached to the wrist. If this still isn't registering, think about hiking through the Grand Canyon.

  • Reply 14 of 15
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,813member
    I really hope people don't start being emboldened to do dangerous things more frequently because they have some fancy tech gadget on their body that might alert emergency services faster. That's exactly the wrong lesson to learn from a self-inflicted injury.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,308member
    Latko said:
    Thanks for reminding me of the ONE moment I would NEVER use Siri
    Remind me what you would do then. Dial with your eyebrow? Your toes?
    watto_cobra
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