Trump administration promised Cook no iPhone tariffs

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2018
Apple's CEO has emerged as a major diplomatic voice for the tech world, seeking to calm relations between the U.S. and China, a new report says.

Tim Cook and Donald Trump


According to a New York Times analysis published Monday, Tim Cook, in the Trump era, "has had to act a lot like the tech industry's top diplomat." For example, Cook recently met with Trump in the Oval Office on April 25, and called for "calmer heads" at a summit meeting in China the month before.

The Times reported for the first time that the administration has promised Cook that even as tariffs on Chinese goods move ahead, the U.S. government will not extend those restrictions to iPhone. It also reported further on Cook's meeting with Trump, which involved economic adviser Larry Kudlow and consisted mostly of the CEO praising last year's tax reform law, while also lobbying the president against a trade war with China.

The story does not clarify whether the no-iPhone-tariffs promise came in that White House meeting or at another time, nor whether it was delivered to Cook by the president himself or by someone else in the administration.

Interestingly, Cook has found cabinet members in the Trump administration more accessible than their Obama era counterparts. In particular, the Apple chief has agreed on issues with Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin and, to a lesser extent, commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, the report said.

In addition, the Times detailed Cook's itinerary on his March visit to China, where he met with multiple senior figures in the Chinese government. Apple's attempts to cozy up to Chinese leadership has been nicknamed "Red Apple" by employees at Apple supplier Foxconn.

Trade war and peace

Apple's efforts are essentially focused on maintaining close ties with both governments and avoiding trade-related acrimony, which Cook and other Apple leaders consider bad for business.

China, throughout Cook's tenure as CEO, has become more and more important to Apple, both for supply chain reasons and because of the importance of China as a market.

Also in the Times piece, it's noted that the president has repeatedly told crowds that "Apple [plans] to build multiple factories in the United States. Apple has no plans to do so and has not publicly corrected him."
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,558member
    "This thread has been locked..."

     :) 
    tallest skil[Deleted User]watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 27
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    Instead of a tariff the government instead recommends judging Apple with infringement of Qualcomm IP
    rob53watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 27
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,077administrator
    "This thread has been locked..."

     :) 
    We'll see how it goes. That said, if you're going to comment in here, read the commenting guidelines first. You are being watched, and scores are being kept.

    Resist the urge to squabble.
    edited June 2018 eightzeroronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 27
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,974member
    "This thread has been locked..."

     :) 
    We'll see how it goes. That said, if you're going to comment in here, read the commenting guidelines first. You are being watched, and scores are being kept.

    Resist the urge to squabble.
    @SpamSandwich is ok but he knows others will mess things up. That said I have faith in Tim to do what’s right for  Apple, all Apple customers as well as other tech companies. I just wish the current administration understands the majority of large US companies are
    multinational and getting into a trade war hurts all Americans not just foreign countries. 
    ronnwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 27
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Before the unconstitutional Federal Reserve was enacted on the day before Christmas Eve 1913, The federal government was funded primarily through tariffs. Seeing as, you know, that’s how to keep a people out of slavery. Since the establishment of the PRIVATE CORPORATION–the federal reserve–the income tax has enslaved all citizens to its usury.

    A restoration of tariffs is the first step toward abolishing the Federal Reserve, and consequently the income tax. As such, it should be supported by anyone who isn’t in favor of literal human slavery. Oh, and a reminder that the Romans made usury illegal because whereas even their chattel slavery was time-based, usury is forever.
    cgWerksracerhomie3toysandmegeorgie01jbdragonmuthuk_vanalingam[Deleted User]
  • Reply 6 of 27
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 191member
    How convenient. But this is obviously a move to prevent more backlash from the administration and adding another point to that very long list that they are trying very hard to expand everyday.
  • Reply 7 of 27
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,750member
    Why? Why should Apple be exempt from tariffs? All it proves is they’re a joke and just Trump pandering to a certain group of voters.
    gutengelmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 27
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,890member
    rob53 said:
    I just wish the current administration understands the majority of large US companies are
    multinational and getting into a trade war hurts all Americans not just foreign countries. 
    It certainly gets tricky with the multi-nationals and products being created in many places, etc. But, I think they are just trying to balance things out some. For example, in the 'trade battle' with Canada, they are imposing tariffs on stuff like aluminum, steel, etc. (if I understand correctly) in an attempt to bargain with Canada on the *massive* tariffs Canada has imposed on stuff like dairy products. (and, while I don't follow the MSM too closely, I've not heard that at all on USA MSM... only a Canadian media outlet, ironically)
    gregoriusmtoysandmejbdragon[Deleted User]
  • Reply 9 of 27
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 671member
    Despite what the libertarians claim here The Federal Reserve came about after a century of boom and bust and financial disasters involving banks. Most people have vague memories of the Great Recession and that was just over 10 years ago so asking some to look further into the past to understand why the FR was needed in 1913 and more than ever is needed in 2018. Someone or in this case something must be overlooking the banks and the part of human nature which puts greed and lawlessness above a stable economy and society. 
    StrangeDaysforegoneconclusionroundaboutnowronnmdriftmeyersingularitybonobobjony0
  • Reply 10 of 27
    I totally agree with Mr Tim. The Trump administration has been really good for businesses of all sizes.
    SpamSandwichSoundJudgmenttoysandmejbdragon
  • Reply 11 of 27
    Why? Why should Apple be exempt from tariffs? All it proves is they’re a joke and just Trump pandering to a certain group of voters.
    Go home buddy.
    SpamSandwichtoysandmejbdragonwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 12 of 27
    revenantrevenant Posts: 481member
    cgWerks said:
    rob53 said:
    I just wish the current administration understands the majority of large US companies are
    multinational and getting into a trade war hurts all Americans not just foreign countries. 
    It certainly gets tricky with the multi-nationals and products being created in many places, etc. But, I think they are just trying to balance things out some. For example, in the 'trade battle' with Canada, they are imposing tariffs on stuff like aluminum, steel, etc. (if I understand correctly) in an attempt to bargain with Canada on the *massive* tariffs Canada has imposed on stuff like dairy products. (and, while I don't follow the MSM too closely, I've not heard that at all on USA MSM... only a Canadian media outlet, ironically)
    the trouble there is the Canadian government does not subsidise dairy products, the U.S. does, meaning the price is artificially lower. trump can say U.S. dairy farmers must be protected, but why cannot Canada protect their farmers from artificially low U.S. dairy product prices? And put in better context, dairy is 0.2% of the total value of good exported to Canada from U.S. The U.S. has a 164% tariff on unshelled peanuts, and a massive 350% tariff on tobacco. The point is that we need to see it as a whole, narrowing down on one specific part of trade is missing the forest for the tree. 
    toysandmeavon b7bonobobjony0
  • Reply 13 of 27
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,890member
    spice-boy said:
    Despite what the libertarians claim here The Federal Reserve came about after a century of boom and bust and financial disasters involving banks. Most people have vague memories of the Great Recession and that was just over 10 years ago so asking some to look further into the past to understand why the FR was needed in 1913 and more than ever is needed in 2018. Someone or in this case something must be overlooking the banks and the part of human nature which puts greed and lawlessness above a stable economy and society. 
    The problem is no matter the original intentions, there are bigger things at play these days on a global scale.
    cf.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Term_auction_facility
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergency_Economic_Stabilization_Act_of_2008
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodd–Frank_Wall_Street_Reform_and_Consumer_Protection_Act
    and
    https://congressionaldish.com/cd174-bank-lobbyist-act/
    maybe
    https://congressionaldish.com/cd175-state-of-war/

    If you think the 'Great Recession' was interesting, wait until you see what is lined up next.
    jbdragon
  • Reply 14 of 27
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,665member
    cgWerks said:
    rob53 said:
    I just wish the current administration understands the majority of large US companies are
    multinational and getting into a trade war hurts all Americans not just foreign countries. 
    It certainly gets tricky with the multi-nationals and products being created in many places, etc. But, I think they are just trying to balance things out some. For example, in the 'trade battle' with Canada, they are imposing tariffs on stuff like aluminum, steel, etc. (if I understand correctly) in an attempt to bargain with Canada on the *massive* tariffs Canada has imposed on stuff like dairy products. (and, while I don't follow the MSM too closely, I've not heard that at all on USA MSM... only a Canadian media outlet, ironically)
    This is part of what Trump is trying to address, that is breaking down some extremely unfair trading practices often with countries very close to us.   We can argue all we want about tariffs and how effective they will be in addressing these issues but the important thing is that they are being addressed adter decades of being locked out.  

    China is often not even operating in its citzens best interest.   For instance one of the biggest item smuggled into China mainland is milk powder / baby formula that due most of China losing all confidence the domestic supply.   That loss of confidence is due to many horror stores some if which are known in the west.   A rational economy would address this by oping up to trade.  Instead China has trade barriers that hurt the Chinese themselves.   

    So you have to ask yourself why should we suffer as an economy when we open our doors while being shut out around the world.  This isnt just about china but rather the realization that free trade is hardly that if you are an American business.   


    jbdragon
  • Reply 15 of 27
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,890member
    revenant said:
    the trouble there is the Canadian government does not subsidise dairy products, the U.S. does, meaning the price is artificially lower. trump can say U.S. dairy farmers must be protected, but why cannot Canada protect their farmers from artificially low U.S. dairy product prices? And put in better context, dairy is 0.2% of the total value of good exported to Canada from U.S. The U.S. has a 164% tariff on unshelled peanuts, and a massive 350% tariff on tobacco. The point is that we need to see it as a whole, narrowing down on one specific part of trade is missing the forest for the tree. 
    Fair point... I'm no expert on the what the tariffs are on individual things/industries or what the imbalances might be. I was just pointing out there is more too it than what is being generally put out in the MSM. I also don't know a lot about NAFTA, but I followed the newer TPP more and it was quite worrying.
  • Reply 16 of 27
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,608member
    The USA’s trade deficit has grown year after year, after year with no let up. There is absolutely no doubt that other countries have screwed American businesses with protective tariffs, predatory dumping of cheap durables on the American market (like Chinese steel). Canada has a 250% tariff on milk imported from the USA for the express purpose of protecting their dairy industry. But the USA is vilified for doing the same? Free trade is a joke. It’s a one-way street with the USA. Every previous administration has negotiated away our industry’s and farmer’s livelihoods with bad trade pacts that favor other countries. I live near Granite City, Illinois, a steel town that has been decimated by the importation of Chinese steel at loss-leader prices. My son is a structural engineer whose employer now forces the engineering department to use Chinese steel even though it rarely conforms to the engineering requirements specified. When his department refuses to certify the cheap junk they get shipped in from China upper management immediately starts applying pressure to use it anyway... just so it lasts long enough to get through the warranty period. Guess what? His employer used to manufacture in the USA using American steel. And we’re talking high pressure, high temperature steam boilers and turbines for power plants, stuff than can kill dozens in an instant if it fails. 

    Trump is an asshole, a jerk, and any other epithet you can throw at him but at least he’s trying to bring the problem to the front burner.
    edited June 2018 cgWerksjbdragond_2
  • Reply 17 of 27
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,505member
    cgWerks said:
    spice-boy said:
    Despite what the libertarians claim here The Federal Reserve came about after a century of boom and bust and financial disasters involving banks. Most people have vague memories of the Great Recession and that was just over 10 years ago so asking some to look further into the past to understand why the FR was needed in 1913 and more than ever is needed in 2018. Someone or in this case something must be overlooking the banks and the part of human nature which puts greed and lawlessness above a stable economy and society. 
    The problem is no matter the original intentions, there are bigger things at play these days on a global scale.
    cf.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Term_auction_facility
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergency_Economic_Stabilization_Act_of_2008
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodd–Frank_Wall_Street_Reform_and_Consumer_Protection_Act
    and
    https://congressionaldish.com/cd174-bank-lobbyist-act/
    maybe
    https://congressionaldish.com/cd175-state-of-war/

    If you think the 'Great Recession' was interesting, wait until you see what is lined up next.
    Oh, is it DOOM?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 27
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,890member
    wizard69 said:
    So you have to ask yourself why should we suffer as an economy when we open our doors while being shut out around the world.  This isnt just about china but rather the realization that free trade is hardly that if you are an American business. 
    This stuff gets so complicated so quickly, especially with many of these trade deals... and can go equally bad w/o them, I think.
    But, yes, free trade would be what an economic system would be shooting for, where the term 'free' means fair, not anything goes.
  • Reply 19 of 27
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    spice-boy said:
    Despite what the libertarians claim here The Federal Reserve came about after a century of boom and bust and financial disasters involving banks.
    Fun fact: You have no idea what you’re talking about. Not only am I not a libertarian, your own vaunted Fed admits to causing the Great Depression. What boom/busts were not created by private banks before the Fed? Oh, remember when the Second Bank got terrified of Andrew Jackson and purposely crashed the US housing market? I do.
    ...why the FR was needed in 1913…
    It wasn’t.
    ...and more than ever is needed in 2018.
    Hopefully you don’t starve when the Second Great Depression hits. Not insulting at all; I seriously just hope you learn from this nonsense.
    ...overlooking the banks…
    I’m directly addressing the banks as the cause of this problem, though. You realize that inflation before the Reserve was -0.2%? Negative. From the founding of the country to 1913. And when the Reserve finally got what they wanted in 1971? Fucking asymptotic.

    SpamSandwichcgWerkstoysandmegeorgie01jbdragonredgeminipajony0
  • Reply 20 of 27
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,890member
    lkrupp said:
    And we’re talking high pressure, high temperature steam boilers and turbines for power plants, stuff than can kill dozens in an instant if it fails. 

    Trump is an asshole, a jerk, and any other epithet you can throw at him but at least he’s trying to bring the problem to the front burner.
    Yes, this latter is more my concern than the financial aspects (though I care about those too). TPP, especially, cleared the way for a lot of quality-control to be enacted on all kind of products areas. These agreements are mostly to open the way for the multi-national corporations to reduce their costs at the expense of consumer safety and economic stability.

    Yeah, I don't like Trump either as a person, and disagree with several of his policies.... but he's at least trying to kick at some of the things that need to be addressed. He's going to have a really hard time, though... as what he's up against is pretty bi-partisan.

    StrangeDays said:
    Oh, is it DOOM?
    No, don't worry. Have another beer (or smoke some more weed if it's legal where you are). Everything is going to be just fine. ;)
    I'll put my tinfoil hat back on if it makes you feel better.
This discussion has been closed.