Adobe takes on iMovie with Project Rush, a powerful cross-device video editing app for cre...

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in General Discussion edited June 2018
Adobe is making a play for social media influencers, online content creators (read YouTubers) and tech savvy consumers with a new cross-platform video production tool that bundles the firm's powerful video editing technology with an easy-to-use, drag-and-drop interface.

Adobe Project Rush


In development for years, Adobe offered a sneak preview of Project Rush to VidCon attendees on Tuesday, showcasing the all-in-one tool that delivers professional results across multiple hardware platforms, both at home and on the go.

About to enter beta testing, Project Rush is the culmination of Adobe's efforts to build an app capable of performing complex video production tasks on nearly any device. When it launches later this year, the software will allow creators to cut clips, add filters, overlay motion graphics, optimize audio and publish to the web within a single app environment that spans Mac, iOS and Windows.

Adobe showed off Project Rush in a presentation last week, highlighting the app's easy to use interface and powerful behind-the-scenes features.

The user interface, which shares design elements across platforms, is similar to Apple's own iMovie, a consumer level cross-platform video editor available to iOS and Mac users. Clips can shot in-app or ingested from local storage, dragged and dropped into place, trimmed and arranged on a color-coded timeline. All changes are automatically synced to the cloud and pushed down to other versions of the app, whether it be mobile or desktop.

Of note to professionals, Rush creates file proxies for large, high-resolution files when editing on mobile, then applies project modifications to the original full-size files when syncing to a desktop version of the app.

For example, a project involving 4K video clips can be offloaded and edited on iPhone at a lower resolution, with edits transferred back and applied to origin 4K clips on Mac. Alternatively, users can publish their edits directly from mobile using the lower resolution proxy files.

The app integrates color correction functions like filters and advanced color editing powered by technology developed for Premiere Pro, Adobe's professional level video editing software. Perhaps more impressive is the vast array of in-app Motion Graphics templates, or animated text packages that are used to create titles.

During the demonstration, Motion Graphics templates developed by Premiere Pro and After Effects artists were applied to a sample video. Unlike presets offered in competing software, titles in Rush can be resized and repositioned, while users can further customize text with different fonts, colors and more. Adobe says additional Motion Graphics templates will be made available through Adobe Stock integration.

Project Rush Platforms


Rush's audio engine is similarly powered by technology borrowed from Adobe's professional level products, in this case Audition and Sensei machine learning. The app is capable of automatically detecting audio in a video clip, allowing users to break out a dedicated channel and quickly duck sound with a click or tap. Special tools provide further functions to improve sound quality and reduce background noise.

As for publishing, Rush includes built-in sharing presets for a variety of platforms. The demo was focused on YouTube, though Adobe promises support for other venues including Facebook, Instagram and more.

Those interested in testing early versions of Rush can apply for a spot in Adobe's beta program.

Lightroom


Also at VidCon, Adobe announced updates to Lightroom CC, which receives new synchronization features for presets and profiles. Specifically, users can sync custom presets and profiles, as well as third-party presets and profiles, between Lightroom CC for Mac, iOS, Windows, Android, ChromeOS and the web.

In addition, Mac versions of the photo editing software now support batch copy and paste for transferring settings from one image to multiple images, while enhanced album sharing options provide more control over what is made available to collaborators. Mobile versions of the app now support preset creation, the Healing Brush tool and, for iOS only, a chromatic aberration removal tool.

Finally, Adobe XD gets Fixed Elements, Overlays, improved crop and place image fills, improved collaboration features, a new math calculations feature, design feature enhancements and more.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    sportyguy209lamboaudi4Cesar Battistini MazieroMacPromacxpressDAalsethSpamSandwichmike54racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 29
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Except Final Cut is not available on a mobile device, which for this product, is one of its selling points. 

    Something always costs something. Boo hoo, hoo, another cheapo techie boy who wants everything for nothing but swears he'd pay X "if it was reasonable." Which means, you want it for free. 

    Don't like it, don't get it. And don't bib-dribble about it. 
    mcdave
  • Reply 3 of 29
    Cesar Battistini MazieroCesar Battistini Maziero Posts: 167unconfirmed, member
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Except Final Cut is not available on a mobile device, which for this product, is one of its selling points. 

    Something always costs something. Boo hoo, hoo, another cheapo techie boy who wants everything for nothing but swears he'd pay X "if it was reasonable." Which means, you want it for free. 

    Don't like it, don't get it. And don't bib-dribble about it. 
    It's not like Final Cut Pro is free you know.......  And I find subscription a sad model as well, for software like that.

    So I agree with him

    And applying continuity to a software is something apple is very familiar with, they could implement it on Final cut and iOS very quickly!

     


    MacProSpamSandwichmike54lamboaudi4sportyguy209jony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 29
    georgie01georgie01 Posts: 254member
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    I agree. In my opinion app subscriptions for professional software are an embarrassment. Various decisions by Adobe over the years, including subscriptions, have led me away from considering their software.

    My first feeling when seeing this software was that it sounds great but I’ll likely never use it, because the Adobe ‘overhead’ isn’t worth it.
    MacProSpamSandwichracerhomie3lamboaudi4sportyguy209jony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 29
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 1,863member
    I don't mind Adobe's monthly model however, I do worry that if it does catch on and get popular that they have the ability to abuse it.

    In the end, CC comes out cheaper and better than CS, you get regular updates and are able to use any of Adobe's software that you may have not considered using if you had to pay for it.

    Having said that, Adobe uses cheap marketing techniques to market their other services like Adobe Stock, or Behance. The desperation in their techniques are off putting and very annoying!
  • Reply 6 of 29
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 488member
    But I think Apple is happy as they do apps often when there is lack of third party apps that would leverage its HW and system capabilities.
    racerhomie3
  • Reply 7 of 29
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,933member
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    I agree...very few like to "rent" their software. If this ends up being a subscription based software then I don't see this succeeding. If you're doing creative content on an iPad, you're most likely already using iMovie which is "free" with "free" updates. 
    mike54lamboaudi4sportyguy209watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 29
    If you don’t need a Mac, which I don’t, get LumaFusion for iOS. Outstanding. 
    DAalsethracerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 29
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 682member
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Except Final Cut is not available on a mobile device, which for this product, is one of its selling points. 

    Something always costs something. Boo hoo, hoo, another cheapo techie boy who wants everything for nothing but swears he'd pay X "if it was reasonable." Which means, you want it for free. 

    Don't like it, don't get it. And don't bib-dribble about it. 
    I don't rent software. I do pay for software. I bought LumaFusion for video editing, Graphic for vector graphics (on both the iPad and my Mac), Procreate for drawing and painting, various writing tools and other apps. So no you are incorrect I don't want something for free. I am more than willing to pay for the developers hard work. I however will not pay protection money every month forever for the same app. I will not let the developer hold my documents hostage if I miss a payment and the app subscription shuts down, I will not have my work at risk if a developer folds, is bought out, or otherwise stops supporting the app. I do pay for software. I don't rent software.
    edited June 2018 SpamSandwichmike54racerhomie3majorslsportyguy209bestkeptsecretjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 29
    Interesting perspectives on subscriptions. I understand the resistance, but the Adobe products are updated and improved at a much more regular basis, introducing and making available features immediately. I do think it's time they make their subscriptions much more flexible, but as I've timidly began to engage in some of them, I've found that subscription-based software has many advantages in practice. I personally enjoy supporting the type of software I really use on a regular basis, and software based on a subscription model feels so much more secure over time and flexible to the changing hardware and operating system features. It's just that subscription supported developers can focus on features that are really useful to their customers even when they aren't flashy, and they don't feel pressure to make big marketable features and keep changes and benefits that could be useful today stored away as an important bullet for the big release, next year or later. Again, my problem with Adobe subscriptions is that the mostly want to sell the value of all their software together which is not the best for everyone.
    edited June 2018 bloggerblog
  • Reply 11 of 29
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,709member
    DAalseth said:
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Except Final Cut is not available on a mobile device, which for this product, is one of its selling points. 

    Something always costs something. Boo hoo, hoo, another cheapo techie boy who wants everything for nothing but swears he'd pay X "if it was reasonable." Which means, you want it for free. 

    Don't like it, don't get it. And don't bib-dribble about it. 
    I don't rent software. I do pay for software. I bought LumaFusion for video editing, Graphic for vector graphics (on both the iPad and my Mac), Procreate for drawing and painting, various writing tools and other apps. So no you are incorrect I don't want something for free. I am more than willing to pay for the developers hard work. I however will not pay protection money every month forever for the same app. I will not let the developer hold my documents hostage if I miss a payment and the app subscription shuts down, I will not have my work at risk if a developer folds, is bought out, or otherwise stops supporting the app. I do pay for software. I don't rent software.

    What a lot of developers do is charge the subscription, but if you decide you don't want to pay anymore you are allowed to keep the last version you downloaded, but you don't get any upgrades.  

    Jetbrains does that with there IDE suite, which worked out very well for me: I was upgrading once a year anyway, and now I get five IDEs for the same price I was paying for one.

    And before signing on with a subscription app, check the export functionality; and I do mean check it. Run it, make sure it works and you can get the data out into another app.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 29
    mike54mike54 Posts: 347member
    Renting software I will not support. Subscriptions is a disease. Companies favour subscription because they know most people will just keep paying, its easy money.
    I wonder how many subscriptions some people are paying for.

    sportyguy209SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 29
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,148member
    I know Devs have to eat. A smaller set of Professionals may feel like Adobe products are worth it. But for me, and amateurs who like to dabble in editing , its better to get iMovie on iOS & macOS.
    Plus Adobe products are not optimized for Macs like Apple made products.
    mcdavewatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 29
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Except Final Cut is not available on a mobile device, which for this product, is one of its selling points. 

    Something always costs something. Boo hoo, hoo, another cheapo techie boy who wants everything for nothing but swears he'd pay X "if it was reasonable." Which means, you want it for free. 

    Don't like it, don't get it. And don't bib-dribble about it. 
    Hey, drop the snarky comments, dude! Are you working in the Russian troll farm?
    The comments section for AppleInsider is there to allow readers a chance to offer informed, respectful opinion, including criticism. In your opinion, anyone who criticizes anything is a whiner. I’ve seen you before: over in the YouTube comments section. 
    watto_cobraavon b7
  • Reply 15 of 29
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 682member
    I know Devs have to eat. A smaller set of Professionals may feel like Adobe products are worth it. But for me, and amateurs who like to dabble in editing , its better to get iMovie on iOS & macOS.
    Plus Adobe products are not optimized for Macs like Apple made products.
    I used iMovie for a long time and it just started to feel cramped. There were things I wanted to do that I couldn't because it was limited. I've just started using LumaFusion a couple of months ago. It's got a steeper learning curve, but already I'm liking what I see. 
    edited June 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 29
    irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,590member
    Subscriptions are fine for business users, for various accounting and tax reasons.  Not so much for prosumers or youtubers.
    kirkgraysportyguy209mcdavewatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 29
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    I'm a big Adobe fan plus CC is a must have for professional graphic design. For all those who say they don't like the subscription model, you probably don't need the software. Many professional applications already use the subscription model and in the case of Adobe CC it actually costs less than it did before when we updated every 18 months. Subscription software is clearly better in my opinion for several reasons like regular updates, quick security patches, cloud storage and for businesses you can automatically disconnect an ex-employee's access. Also if your agency scales up or down you only pay for the number of subscriptions you need at any particular time.

    It is predicted that by 2020, 80% of all software will be subscription rather than traditional license, so you might as well get used to it.
    edited June 2018
  • Reply 18 of 29
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 682member
    volcan said:
    For all those who say they don't like the subscription model, you probably don't need the software. Many professional applications already use the subscription model and in the case of Adobe CC it actually costs less than it did before when we updated every 18 months.
    Quite true. I know a lot of high end server based software has been that way for a long time. It can make sense for a corporation to spend a fixed amount each month for software. I can see a company going with Office 365. It does everything the staff needs, and essentially takes care of itself. But for the individual, the SOHO, the prosumer it often doesn't make sense. I'm trying to get my writing career going. The last thing I need is $X/month for Office 365 eating into the already meager income I get from my books. 
    volcan said:
    It is predicted that by 2020, 80% of all software will be subscription rather than traditional license, so you might as well get used to it.
    That's possible, but only if you include corporate software sales. They will like the convenience of a subscription with its automatic updates, and less hands on desktop support. They will like the ability to budget out year after year and not have IT coming to them with "We need $X to upgrade everyone to the new Office". So I can see 80% of the total software profits being from subscriptions. For the consumer market though, I doubt it will be anywhere near that high. If my copy of some specialty app that I use is out of date, I'm fine with that as long as it does what I need. 
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 29
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,169member
    Yet another reason not to get an iPad Pro. Where are Apple? Where are the iOS Pro Apps & Services?  They’ve sat on iMovie for what? 6-7 years? Where’s Final Cut Express or Logic Express?

    We looked for a decent video editor on iOS for ages and there are no natives, only sloppy Android ports built with cross-platform frameworks.  iOS could be great for the semi-Pro market but Apple needs to start taking it seriously or nobody else will.

    If we went to war tomorrow, you’d hope none of your generals were from Apple Exec Leadership!
  • Reply 20 of 29
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,169member
    All Adobe's software requires awful monthly subscriptions....after a year or two you would be better off buying Final cut pro.
    Buttons on OPEX is far better for actual businesses.
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