How to use Safari's Picture-in-Picture mode with YouTube on macOS

Posted:
in macOS
If you want to watch YouTube videos while performing other tasks on the Mac, one way is to take advantage of Safari's Picture-in-Picture function. AppleInsider shows how to access and use the hidden-from-view feature with Google's video service.




Introduced in macOS Sierra, Picture-in-Picture mode for Safari allows users to pop a video out from a webpage and onto the Mac desktop. The floating and resizable window hovers above other applications, keeping it in view while other applications are kept usable in the background.

While it is easily available in apps, including iTunes, as well as some websites, it is oddly not immediately accessible when viewing YouTube, arguably one of the biggest video services online. YouTube does support Picture-in-Picture for Safari, but there's a trick to actually using it.

Starting YouTube Picture-in-Picture

Open Safari. It is not currently possible to use the Picture-in-Picture feature with other browsers, not even Google Chrome considering this tip deals with YouTube.

Open a YouTube video that you wish to view. At this point it can be paused or left to continue playing.

YouTube Safari Picture in Picture macOS


Right-click on the middle of the video. This brings up YouTube's contextual menu which, while interesting, should not be used for the moment.

YouTube Safari Picture in Picture macOS


Immediately right-click the middle of the video again. This second right-click brings up a Safari menu, which includes the option we need.

YouTube Safari Picture in Picture macOS


Click Enter Picture in Picture. This will move the video from the browser out into its own floating panel.

YouTube Safari Picture in Picture macOS

Using Picture-in-Picture

The video panel can be moved around the screen by clicking and dragging it to a different corner. If you hold the Command key down, you can drag it to a specific point of your screen instead of a corner.

The size of the panel can be adjusted by dragging the edges or the corner to make it larger or smaller. At most, the panel can be resized to take up a quarter of the screen.



The playback controls on the website will still work as normal, but there are also basic controls on the video panel itself, shown by mousing over the picture.

YouTube Safari Picture in Picture macOS


To exit the mode, click the X symbol in the top left corner of the video panel, or by clicking the symbol next to the play button in the panel to replace it in the page. You can also right-click the webpage as before and select Exit Picture in Picture.


Further Notes

Websites have to enable Picture-in-Picture mode for it to work, but not every site does so. For example, while Vimeo is more direct in offering the feature by openly displaying a PiP button, there is currently no way to use the function with video from Netflix nor Amazon Prime Instant Video.

Vimeo Picture in Picture Safari
Alex1N

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    TireaTirea Posts: 4member
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    Cesar Battistini MazierofastasleepminicoffeeAlex1N
  • Reply 2 of 13
    Sweet. Thanks AppleInsider!
  • Reply 3 of 13
    Cesar Battistini MazieroCesar Battistini Maziero Posts: 147unconfirmed, member
    Tirea said:
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    I was going to comment just that! 

    It makes PIP work on everything like it should!
    TireaAlex1N
  • Reply 4 of 13
    Tirea said:
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    That plugin seems to have a lot of unnecessary permissions... why does it need access to all of my personal information to include Credit Cards and Passwords?

    Zero chance that's going to stay on my computer. Apple should remove it.




    anantksundarambloggerblogminicoffeeAlex1N
  • Reply 5 of 13
    Tirea said:
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    I was going to comment just that! 

    It makes PIP work on everything like it should!
    QUESTION: Why does it need access to all of my personal information to include Credit Cards and Passwords?

    ANSWER: It doesn't.

    I'm going to file a complaint with Apple.
    anantksundarambloggerblogAlex1Ntoysandme
  • Reply 6 of 13
    TireaTirea Posts: 4member
    commentzilla said:

    That plugin seems to have a lot of unnecessary permissions... why does it need access to all of my personal information to include Credit Cards and Passwords?

    Zero chance that's going to stay on my computer. Apple should remove it.

    Almost every safari extension seems to have way to much privileges! PiPer is the only extension I use that does not show "Can read sensitive information (...) on: all websites" and instead just lists the few websites it works with. Even things like DuckDuckGo's "Privacy Essentials", Parallels "Open in for IE" and most ad blockers have the exact same warning. It's a generic warning (from Apple) for every extension that uses injected code/scripts. 
    minicoffeeAlex1N
  • Reply 7 of 13
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 1,808member
    Tirea said:
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    That plugin seems to have a lot of unnecessary permissions... why does it need access to all of my personal information to include Credit Cards and Passwords?

    Zero chance that's going to stay on my computer. Apple should remove it.
    If the source code is available on Github, as @Tirea ;mentioned, can someone remove all those invasive permissions?
  • Reply 8 of 13
    TireaTirea Posts: 4member
    Tirea said:
    There is an awesome extension for Safari called PiPer that adds a button for PiP mode to websites like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and many more. It can be downloaded from the Safari Extension Gallery right here: https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=com.amarcus.safari.piper-BQ6Q24MF9X 
    The source code is also available on github for anyone who's interested!  :)
    That plugin seems to have a lot of unnecessary permissions... why does it need access to all of my personal information to include Credit Cards and Passwords?

    Zero chance that's going to stay on my computer. Apple should remove it.
    If the source code is available on Github, as @Tirea mentioned, can someone remove all those invasive permissions?
    They don't have access to your passwords or other sensitive information, it's a generic warning that was introduced by Apple in Safari 10, if I remember correctly. It just shows up for every extension that injects code or scripts, like PiPer does to show you the PiP button. It's a bit like Gatekeeper: if an app isn't signed by Apple or a trusted developer, macOS will try to prevent your from running the app and warn you that it's not an a trusted app. That doesn't mean the app is harmful or any type of malware, Apple just wants you to know that there may be a potential risk. Sadly in the case of safari extensions they made it seem like every extension is constantly spying on you and stealing your passwords.  :/
    Here's a link to the source code
    https://github.com/amarcu5/PiPer
    edited June 2018 fastasleep
  • Reply 9 of 13
    Tirea said:

    They don't have access to your passwords or other sensitive information, it's a generic warning that was introduced by Apple in Safari 10, if I remember correctly. It just shows up for every extension that injects code or scripts, like PiPer does to show you the PiP button. It's a bit like Gatekeeper: if an app isn't signed by Apple or a trusted developer, macOS will try to prevent your from running the app and warn you that it's not an a trusted app. That doesn't mean the app is harmful or any type of malware, Apple just wants you to know that there may be a potential risk. Sadly in the case of safari extensions they made it seem like every extension is constantly spying on you and stealing your passwords.  :/
    Here's a link to the source code
    https://github.com/amarcu5/PiPer
    That's utter non-sense. It's certainly not a generic warning.

    I have two ad-blockers that do not have permission to read webpages or anything else. Download and install a bunch of different plugins and you'll see all different kinds of permissions. Some do have access to everything, like TrafficLight (Bit Defender) a web security plugin.

    Different plugins have different permissions based on how the plugin in configured by the developer. Why would PIPer need access to Credit Cards, Passwords and browsing history to provide a shortcut for a picture-in-picture mode? If an ad-blocker doesn't need it, why in the hell would a simple shortcut need it when all of the functionality is already built into macOS? I've also never seen a plugin with such a specific list of websites, it's certainly not a generic list. That list seems to have been programmed into the plugin which is probably where Apple got it.

    I suggest reconfiguring the plugin so it does not access unnecessary personal data.

    Also, just because something is on GITHUB does not automatically make it safe.

    edited June 2018 bloggerblogAlex1N
  • Reply 10 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,508member
    I'd just be happy if I could play embedded YouTube clips in iOS' full-screen mode on my iPad Pro. Apparently I'm the only person who is denied by YouTube:


  • Reply 11 of 13
    jeromecjeromec Posts: 63member
    I'd just be happy if I could play embedded YouTube clips in iOS' full-screen mode on my iPad Pro. Apparently I'm the only person who is denied by YouTube:


    You're not the only one. It drove me quite mad, especially since it used to work. But it seems to be working in iOS 12 beta. Which now has a public beta. Unless Youtube (again?)pro-actively blocks it.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 13
    TireaTirea Posts: 4member
    commentzilla said:

    That's utter non-sense. It's certainly not a generic warning.

    I have two ad-blockers that do not have permission to read webpages or anything else. Download and install a bunch of different plugins and you'll see all different kinds of permissions. Some do have access to everything, like TrafficLight (Bit Defender) a web security plugin.

    Different plugins have different permissions based on how the plugin in configured by the developer. Why would PIPer need access to Credit Cards, Passwords and browsing history to provide a shortcut for a picture-in-picture mode? If an ad-blocker doesn't need it, why in the hell would a simple shortcut need it when all of the functionality is already built into macOS? I've also never seen a plugin with such a specific list of websites, it's certainly not a generic list. That list seems to have been programmed into the plugin which is probably where Apple got it.

    I suggest reconfiguring the plugin so it does not access unnecessary personal data.

    Also, just because something is on GITHUB does not automatically make it safe.

    Every safari extension that injects code gets this generic warning. 

    No not every safari extension that's out there
    , just the ones that inject custom code into the browser/webpage. There are a ton of extensions that don't access any sensitive information but get this warning because they use some form of code/script injection to work, which means they technically could inject a script that steals your private data. This includes trusted extension like the ones from DuckDuckGo or Parallels Desktop (like I mentioned) or the one from BitDefender you mentioned, even extensions from apps that are available in the Mac App Store and have to follow the MAS guidelines tend to get this warning.  A ton of developers of very awesome and trustworthy safari extensions constantly get complaints because when users read that warning they immediately think that the extensions uses their private data even though they do not.

    While the list is indeed very specific, it's the websites that PiPer works with which means Safari will warn you about them because PiPer injects its code into those websites to give you that convenient PiP button. Most extensions are designed to work for every website so the warning will read "all websites" instead. 

    And I never said it's safe because it's on github! I said the source code is available on github because I know that safari extension are constantly being reported as "unsafe" just because Apple implemented this warning and so for everybody that has some understanding of JavaScript, please have a look at the source code and see for yourself what PiPer does and how it works. 
    edited June 2018 Alex1N
  • Reply 13 of 13
    toysandmetoysandme Posts: 186member
    One big problem with Apple's solution is that you can't skip through ads. 
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