Boston Red Sox player J.D. Martinez credits iPads for his rise to home run leader

Posted:
in iPad edited July 16
The Boston Red Sox slugger headed for the All-Star Game says intensive studying of batting practice footage on the iPad makes him "a trained hitter."




Every batting practice session that J.D. Martinez takes is filmed by two iPads mounted on either side of the batting cage. Then, when Martinez steps up, he brings his own personal iPad to the mix.

Red Sox video coordinator Billy Broadbent aims Martinez's iPad at the batter's box and later the player studies the footage on it. MLB.com says that Martinez has risen from "castoff" to "the best hitter in baseball" since he started using the iPads, but he's arrived there through diligent study in conjunction with the devices.

Martinez specifically notes the mechanics of his swing and says that he minutely examines playback footage showing multiple images side by side to cover all angles.

"It makes me who I am. I have to grind away to get out of the bad habits," Martinez said to the Associated Press by way of Boston.com. "I have to stay on top of it because my body will find a way to let 10 million swings I've taken when I was a kid slowly come back in."

"I always tell everybody that I'm not a natural hitter. I'm a trained hitter," he added.

His process has not always been welcomed by his teammates. He first tried it in 2014 when he was with Detroit, but the Tigers players and staff ribbed him for it and he stopped.

"In [2014] I was too scared to do it because I was too young, and it was an older team," says Martinez. "In [2015], I had more confidence."

The raw stats make it clear his approach works. In 2014 he had 23 home runs compared to 38 in 2015 and this year 29. Over the same time, his batting average went from 2014's .315 to .282 the next year. At the end of the first half of the 2018 campaign, Martinez's average stands at .328 with 29 homers.

Martinez is currently third in batting average, plus first in home runs and runs batted in in the American League.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    Makes you appreciate legends such as Babe Ruth who did not have this technology during his time yet still managed to rise the ranks to greatness.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 18,587member
    He's a remarkable player.

    While I am as much of an Apple fan as any other, it's a bit of a stretch to say that it was due to the iPad per se.
    edited July 16 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 12
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,121administrator
    He's a remarkable player.

    While I am as much of an Apple fan as any other, it's a bit of a stretch to say that it was due to the iPad per se.
    I'm inclined to believe the guy when he credits it.
    claire1
  • Reply 4 of 12
    farmboyfarmboy Posts: 141member
    Makes you appreciate legends such as Babe Ruth who did not have this technology during his time yet still managed to rise the ranks to greatness.
    Never underestimate the power of Beer. Nutritious, therapeutic, an essential part of any training regimen.
    king editor the grate
  • Reply 5 of 12
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,494member
    Looks like this smart guy has figured out how to use the iPad to improve the quality of his game. This makes a ton of sense if you subscribe to the four basic tenets of a quality improvement process: Plan - Do - Study - Act. The iPad is playing a crucial role in the Study part of his quality improvement process and the results are reflected in his performance. Sure, the rest of the process is all on the individual, but having the right tool that maximizes the actionable data and information that he obtains to apply to the study phase of the process is vital to the success of the process and how quickly the improvement actions can be applied. Bravo!
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 6 of 12
    ciacia Posts: 43member
    farmboy said:
    Makes you appreciate legends such as Babe Ruth who did not have this technology during his time yet still managed to rise the ranks to greatness.
    Never underestimate the power of Beer. Nutritious, therapeutic, an essential part of any training regimen.
    And little chocolate donuts....
  • Reply 7 of 12
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 170member
    The author of this story said "I'm inclined to believe the guy when he credits it." But: 
    1. Teixeria credits mismatched socks.
    2. Dickey credits the nicknames for his bats.
    3. Wade Boggs credits writing a word in the sand before every at bat.
    4. Turk Wendell credits chewing on four pieces of black licorice. 
    5. Biggio credits pine tar on his helmet.
    6. McGuire credits using the same cup each game (not for drinking).
    7. Scherzer credits not revealing what his superstitions are (is that a contradiction?)
    I'm inclined to believe each of these guys when they credit these things.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,121administrator
    The author of this story said "I'm inclined to believe the guy when he credits it." But: 
    1. Teixeria credits mismatched socks.
    2. Dickey credits the nicknames for his bats.
    3. Wade Boggs credits writing a word in the sand before every at bat.
    4. Turk Wendell credits chewing on four pieces of black licorice. 
    5. Biggio credits pine tar on his helmet.
    6. McGuire credits using the same cup each game (not for drinking).
    7. Scherzer credits not revealing what his superstitions are (is that a contradiction?)
    I'm inclined to believe each of these guys when they credit these things.
    None of these suggestions involve training, education, and process evaluation and improvement.

    And, I am not the author of the story.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 421member
    The author of this story said "I'm inclined to believe the guy when he credits it." But: 
    1. Teixeria credits mismatched socks.
    2. Dickey credits the nicknames for his bats.
    3. Wade Boggs credits writing a word in the sand before every at bat.
    4. Turk Wendell credits chewing on four pieces of black licorice. 
    5. Biggio credits pine tar on his helmet.
    6. McGuire credits using the same cup each game (not for drinking).
    7. Scherzer credits not revealing what his superstitions are (is that a contradiction?)
    I'm inclined to believe each of these guys when they credit these things.
    The Boston Red Sox slugger headed for the All-Star Game says intensive studying of batting practice footage on the iPad makes him "a trained hitter."

    Martinez watches specifically for the mechanics of his swing and says that he minutely examines playback footage showing multiple images side by side to cover all angles.

    What do the superstitions you mention have to do with how this player is using iPad to film and study his own swing? Helps him identify any bad habits and fix them.

    I also think McGuire had a little more help than just wearing the same cup for however long..   B)

  • Reply 10 of 12
    The author of this story said "I'm inclined to believe the guy when he credits it." But: 
    1. Teixeria credits mismatched socks.
    2. Dickey credits the nicknames for his bats.
    3. Wade Boggs credits writing a word in the sand before every at bat.
    4. Turk Wendell credits chewing on four pieces of black licorice. 
    5. Biggio credits pine tar on his helmet.
    6. McGuire credits using the same cup each game (not for drinking).
    7. Scherzer credits not revealing what his superstitions are (is that a contradiction?)
    I'm inclined to believe each of these guys when they credit these things.

    You seriously don't know the difference between a physical aid and superstition?
  • Reply 11 of 12
    claire1claire1 Posts: 201unconfirmed, member
    Of course the iKnockoff users will claim that Apple paid this guy millions to say that....
  • Reply 12 of 12
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,525member
    Strangely enough, he credits Candy Crush for his rise to greatness...
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