Benchmarks for 2018 MacBook Pros show dramatic multi-core performance gains

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
Though Apple's 2018 MacBook Pros have shown only modest gains in single-core and graphics performance, early multi-core benchmarks have grown in leaps and bounds versus 2017.

2018 MacBook Pro


So far, 15-inch MacBook Pros are showing multi-core gains of 39 to 46 percent, while 13-inch systems are up a whopping 81 to 86 percent, according to Primate Labs founder John Poole. The increases mostly due to extra cores -- up from two to four on 13-inch Pros, and four to six on 15-inch models -- as well as higher Turbo Boost frequencies.

13-inch MacBook Pro benchmarks


The 15-inch laptops have the added benefit of switching to faster DDR4 RAM. 13-inch Pros are still using DDR3, Poole noted.

15-inch MacBook Pro benchmarks


"What's interesting is that the 2018 13-inch models are competitive with the 2017 15-inch models in both single-core and multi-core performance, making the new 2018 13-inch MacBook Pro a smaller and lighter replacement for the 2017 15-inch MacBook Pro," he added.

He concluded by claiming that the 2018 MacBook Pro line is "the most substantial upgrade (at least regarding performance) since the introduction of quad-core processors in the 2011 MacBook Pro."

Apple released the new Pros just last week. On 15-inch models users can scale up to a 2.9-gigahertz Core i9 processor, 32 gigabytes of RAM, and a 4-terabyte SSD, with a pricetag of $6,699 -- more than some iMac Pro configurations. Simply choosing the stock 512-gigabyte SSD, however, knocks an otherwise peak-performance system down to $3,499.

YouTube presenter Dave Lee has claimed that the thermal design of the 15-inch Pro doesn't provide enough cooling for Core i9 configurations, limiting top speeds. In a video posted to his YouTube channel on Tuesday, Lee showed one running Adobe Premiere Pro at surprisingly low clock speeds. Tests conducted put the average clock on load at around 2.2 gigahertz, well below the advertised 2.9 gigahertz.

Lee's findings are somewhat questionable in that assumptions are being made based on a single machine's performance with an unoptimized app.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    KITAKITA Posts: 201member
    The gains are huge for the 2018 13", even with sustained performance. That being said, they also throttle a lot.

    2017 MacBook Pro 13 TB w/ i5-7267U (28W)



    2018 MacBook Pro 13 w/ i5-8259U (28W)



    Thinkpad T480s w/ i5-8250U (15W)


  • Reply 2 of 9
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,001member
    KITA said:
    The gains are huge for the 2018 13", even with sustained performance. That being said, they also throttle a lot.

    2017 MacBook Pro 13 TB w/ i5-7267U (28W)



    2018 MacBook Pro 13 w/ i5-8259U (28W)



    Thinkpad T480s w/ i5-8250U (15W)


    Always here to just try and shit all over everything aren't we....
    lkrupptmay
  • Reply 3 of 9
    Dave Lee, a giant in computer thermal engineering history. /s
    tmay
  • Reply 4 of 9
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,324member
    The instabilty in those Thinkpad scores should worry the consumer.

    Apple should release a benchmarking app that tests Metal API and show how that actually impacts one's workflow.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    KITAKITA Posts: 201member
    Dave Lee, a giant in computer thermal engineering history. /s
    Aaron Zello had also noted throttling in the i9 MBP.

    Notebookcheck on the i5 13" MBP:
    The results after our initial benchmarks are, however, sobering and fall short of our expectations. The Coffee Lake-U chip consumes more power than Kaby Lake-R CPUs and the MacBook Pro 13 hits the temperature limit of the CPU after a couple of seconds. The performance advantage seems to be limited to the integrated graphics adapter, but we will check that thoroughly over the next couple of days.



  • Reply 6 of 9
    KITAKITA Posts: 201member
    The instabilty in those Thinkpad scores should worry the consumer.
    Those are just the results of each run (back-to-back), not necessarily a continuous workload. Even the worst case for any given run was still higher than the MBP at its peak.

    Off-topic:

    Notebookcheck did experiment with undervolting the 8th gen chip in the T480s and was able to keep a consistent score of ~700 for each run.


    I wonder if something like that might be a potential solution for the MacBook Pro.
  • Reply 7 of 9
    KITA said:
    The gains are huge for the 2018 13", even with sustained performance. That being said, they also throttle a lot.

    2017 MacBook Pro 13 TB w/ i5-7267U (28W)



    2018 MacBook Pro 13 w/ i5-8259U (28W)



    Thinkpad T480s w/ i5-8250U (15W)


    PC throttle too? Oh No!
  • Reply 8 of 9
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,912member
    Interesting comment from a benchmark guru about the 13" replacing the 15 performance wise.   I look at it this way apparently he doesnt have a clue.   Most buyers of the 15" model do so for the performance offered, a 13" is always a down grade.  

    To put it another way anybody buying a 15" due to its performance will not be looking at the 13". 
  • Reply 9 of 9
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 5,008administrator
    wizard69 said:
    Interesting comment from a benchmark guru about the 13" replacing the 15 performance wise.   I look at it this way apparently he doesnt have a clue.   Most buyers of the 15" model do so for the performance offered, a 13" is always a down grade.  

    To put it another way anybody buying a 15" due to its performance will not be looking at the 13". 
    Not unless they were looking at the 15-inch a week and a half ago.
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