After being killed by Apple, Palm branded devices coming back from the dead

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 8
The Palm brand may be revived before the end of this year, with recently discovered filings revealing a smartphone produced by TCL has been provided to regulators for testing, one that uses the Palm name and has the model number "PVG100."

Palm Pre


Filings with the Federal Communications Commission and the Wi-Fi Alliance confirm the existence of a Palm-branded mobile device, but provides relatively few details about it, according to a report from Android Police. The listing for the FCC advises of the name PVG100, and aside from some operating frequencies, offers barely any extra information.

The Wi-Fi Alliance filing offers a few more details for the PVG100, namely that it is a phone that runs Android 8.1, and that while the device will have Wi-Fi, it will only operate at the 2.4GHz frequency band. The lack of 5GHz Wi-Fi support suggests the device will be a budget smartphone, but it is plausible for the filing to be updated with the extra support in the future.

In 2017, an executive for TCL advised a Palm-branded smartphone would be returning in 2018, with rumors indicating the device could launch on Verizon. After HP bought Palm, TCL later acquired the Palm Brand, then set up the Palm Ventures Group named in the filings.

It is unclear exactly what TCL's plans are for the resurrection of Palm, but it is unlikely to be much more than in name only. The Chinese device producer sells smartphones and mobile devices under other brands, such as under its licensing deal with BlackBerry, creating Android devices that reuse the design and UI language of that brand.

The use of Android also suggests there is no real intention for Palm devices to return to using webOS, or another self-developed platform.

The Palm sale to HP was primarily intended to allow HP to use webOS for its TouchPad tablet, but the shortlived project ended in a $99 firesale following slow sales. The operating system was then sold to LG, which uses webOS to power smart functions on its televisions.

Palm's tablets are arguably precursors to the iPhone, providing a touchscreen interface and smartphone-like features, such as the Treo line running PalmOS and, towards the end of its life, the WebOS-based Palm Pre. The introduction of the iPhone and its competitors are likely to have been the main cause of the brand's demise.
GeorgeBMac
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    Just what consumers need, another same. Isn't there enough choice in this market already? Hey, manufacturers, here's a novel idea: how about creating something totally new that doesn't already exist! (hint: it's *not* a phone)
    edited August 8 olswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 28
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    jbdragonsphericols
  • Reply 3 of 28
    Please bring back the creepy girl from the Palm Pre commercials, too, since that did nothing but scare everyone away. :wink: 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 28
    seankillseankill Posts: 417member
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. 
    jbdragonGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 5 of 28
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,522member
    seankill said:
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. 
    As I remember, though the design and concepts of webOS were great, performance was always a bit of a drag.  I don't think it was just the hardware either.
    netmageronnspheric
  • Reply 6 of 28
    seankill said:
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. I had a Palm Pre and it was a really solid little device. The only problem wa it was too small. I liked the OS and the multi tasking was great, for the time. Apps are what killed it or lack thereof. 
  • Reply 7 of 28
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    WebOS might have been good, but the phone itself was overrated.  I own the Palm Pre and it was greatly inferior to the the Blackberry.

    If Palm came out with a 7” Pre maybe the concept would have worked.  Apps are a superior experience, especially on smaller devices.

    I’m not sure the device I envision for a successful Palm device could have existed at the time... the hardware didn’t exist.
  • Reply 8 of 28
    TCL should be named ‘The Nostalgia Cellphone’ maker!
    jbdragon
  • Reply 9 of 28
    nunzynunzy Posts: 657member
    Palm killed the Newton. Palm should rot in hell for that.
  • Reply 10 of 28
    netmagenetmage Posts: 207member
    crowley said:
    seankill said:
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. 
    As I remember, though the design and concepts of webOS were great, performance was always a bit of a drag.  I don't think it was just the hardware either.
    Mobile devices weren't powerful enough for a javascript+HTML based OS at that time. They probably still aren't efficient enough to support that today (consider the difficulties Android has supporting a VM based programming environment).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 28
    crowley said:
    seankill said:
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. 
    As I remember, though the design and concepts of webOS were great, performance was always a bit of a drag.  I don't think it was just the hardware either.
    I own an LG TV with WebOS, about four years old.  It is the slowest UI I've experienced on any TV.  (Note: not a dealbreaker)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 28
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,872member
    netmage said:
    crowley said:
    seankill said:
    Agreed. The software was probably better that iOS at the time, minus the apps. The multitasking on the iPhone seems to take after WebOS. 
    As I remember, though the design and concepts of webOS were great, performance was always a bit of a drag.  I don't think it was just the hardware either.
    Mobile devices weren't powerful enough for a javascript+HTML based OS at that time. They probably still aren't efficient enough to support that today (consider the difficulties Android has supporting a VM based programming environment).
    Yeah, VMs in general make it very difficult to performance tune software because they have their own behaviours which you can't change to fit your app.  Which is why Apple's approach of using layers of APIs to make app development faster/easier (Swift on top of Objective-C on top of C) is better.  That way, if you want to performance tune certain parts of your app, you can just use the lower-level APIs to do so.  Rather than being handcuffed by the VM in many places.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 28
    Someone found a create at the New Jersey docks. They were sitting right next to the Cabbage Patch Kids.
    sphericwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 28
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,821member
    nunzy said:
    Palm killed the Newton. Palm should rot in hell for that.
    Steve Jobs killed the Newton as it was a money loser. But it also led Apple to the creation of the iPhone and iPad.
    ronnnunzyGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 28
    A bit nostalgic... I'd just started in real estate in 2004 and had a 3g white iBook. (Just beautiful!) 

    I bought a Sony Ericson 'something or other phone' and a Palm Pilot gizmo.

    Nothing synced and nothing worked with any of the Real Estate services I needed. ZipForms, MLS, e-Keys. Everything was Windows based and sucked!

    Then came the original iPhone and even with no copy and paste, no GPS, and 2g... it was the greatest device ever invented. Made my life so much easier! :)

    Good times.
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 28
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,756member
    "Bring back the Microsoft Kin!"

    /s
    cornchippscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 28
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,521member
    Unless Palm have disrupting idea, "Good Luck" !!
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 28
    "Bring back the Microsoft Kin!"

    /s
    and Balmer ...
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 28
    across04 said:
    WebOS was actually very good. It was deployed on flawed hardware. If they had introduced this on a "slab" phone, it could have been a big hit.
    WebOS was VERY good.  It was certainly better than the first, second, maybe even third generation Android.  HPQ should have never bought Palm, they had not a clue what to do with it, so it died.

    Today is far too late to introduce yet another me-too Android handset.  Because Androids appeal mostly to users of feature phones the Android winners will be Chinese.  It wouldn't surprise me any if sometime in the future the Chinese morph Android into their own proprietary OS.
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 28
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 2,737member
    Palm devices with phones were excellent...   As a systems analyst I used them as pagers and phones for on-call (which was all the time) as well as the standard appointments, etc...   Later, training to be a nurse I used them to store my medical manuals so they were always available -- even at the bed side.   And later, as a home health nurse with a GPS attached I used them to find my clients and to find my way home afterwards.  And, as a general user, I used their web browsers and camera quite a bit...

    It wasn't till the iPhone 5 that I grudgingly gave up my beloved Palm....  But it still couldn't store my medical manuals...
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