Adobe InDesign & Illustrator upgrades will add direct access to 9,000-plus fonts

Posted:
in Mac Software edited August 9
Adobe has announced that upcoming upgrades of InDesign CC and Illustator CC will provide overhauled font interfaces, including direct access to over 9,000 fonts through a Creative Cloud subscription.

Adobe InDesign CC


Designers will be able to browse and preview the fonts without syncing them, Adobe said. Only once a font is selected will people have to activate and license it if they haven't already.

The updates should also make it easier to filter and sort available fonts, and allow designers to change sample text to display anything they like.

Within InDesign, users will be able delve into the font library by going into the Font menu then clicking a "Find More" tab. There they'll be able to bookmark fonts they want to use later, and alter sample text by choosing it manually or hovering over text in their project.

Adobe hasn't said when the updates will launch, but one of the benefits of a Creative Cloud subscription is that the company is continually rolling out updates, some big and some small.

Plans including InDesign and Illustrator start at $20.99 per month or $239.88 prepaid for an individual app in a year-long subscription. Upping fees to $52.99 per month or $599.88 prepaid gets access to the complete Creative Cloud suite, including titles like Photoshop and XD, plus options for expanded cloud storage beyond the default 100 gigabytes.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    cashxxcashxx Posts: 100member
    "Only once a font is selected will people have to activate and license it if they haven't already"

    So is it an extra charge for each font or are they included with the subscription of the Adobe stuff?  Little unclear to me.
    edited August 9
  • Reply 2 of 11
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,224administrator
    cashxx said:
    "Only once a font is selected will people have to activate and license it if they haven't already"

    So is it an extra charge for each font or are they included with the subscription of the Adobe stuff?  Little unclear to me.
    If a font is free, you don't have to license it. If it is not, then you do.

    Direct access does not equal free.
    edited August 9
  • Reply 3 of 11
    chabigchabig Posts: 620member
    So essentially...a font store.
    SpamSandwichStrangeDays
  • Reply 4 of 11
    netlingnetling Posts: 29member
    Adobe is once more screwing people by not actually upgrading their app and providing a crumb to designers, saying "look a bunch of fonts!" Which there are many font foundries and other font outlets, there are also many FREE quality fonts or open source fonts some are at fonts.google.com

    I'm not a big google supporter but if I can put Google against Adobe for better competition... Go to Google for FREE fonts!!!
    bigbillygoatgruff
  • Reply 5 of 11
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 142member
    I used to love Illustrator, Photoshop and used InDesign some too.  I was a big Adobe fan back in the day.  I liked to collect fonts too, until Apple and Microsoft developed TrueType and it got all muddled again.  Of course, that happened because Adobe was charging a mint for fonts.

    Adobe’s subscription model killed my love of their products as I used them mostly for personal use.  Companies can justify subscriptions fees because they use those products on a daily basis for their business needs.  It’s harder for an individual to justify the expense when these programs are used sporadically rather than every day.  We have less expensive options out there that do what we need 95% of the time.
    bigbillygoatgruff
  • Reply 6 of 11
    JWSC said:
    I used to love Illustrator, Photoshop and used InDesign some too.  I was a big Adobe fan back in the day.  I liked to collect fonts too, until Apple and Microsoft developed TrueType and it got all muddled again.  Of course, that happened because Adobe was charging a mint for fonts.

    Adobe’s subscription model killed my love of their products as I used them mostly for personal use.  Companies can justify subscriptions fees because they use those products on a daily basis for their business needs.  It’s harder for an individual to justify the expense when these programs are used sporadically rather than every day.  We have less expensive options out there that do what we need 95% of the time.
    I used to do a lot of freelance graphic design work--back in the days before the subscription model.  I preferred InDesign (and QuarkXPress) to word processors all along because I hate it when SW like Word tries to think for me.  No longer being a "power user," there is no way I can justify buying a subscription at those rates.  A one-time purchase that I can use for the life of my computer, sure.  I don't know if this model has worked out the way Adobe wanted it to, but it has broken a lot of people from an addiction to Adobe products.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 418member
    wow they finally ran out of features to copy from Corel Draw, all they need now is some shite clip art :P
  • Reply 8 of 11
    I'd be so much happier is they spent time simply making the apps work better. I do subscribe to all the Adobe apps. I have to for work. But it's been years since an upgrade came out and when you open the new version it runs snappier. I guess they could say "We've done all we can on that front". But in every software company I've worked at there is always ways to make things run faster and better. It just takes the dedication of resources. Adobe mainly wants to add things that cost their customers more money. They don't want to improve what they already have. 
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 418member
    The last I heard, the CC UI was built in Adobe Air. That's why text inputs never look quite right, keyboard shortcuts work unpredictably, etc. 
    edited August 9
  • Reply 10 of 11
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 566member
    I'd be so much happier is they spent time simply making the apps work better. I do subscribe to all the Adobe apps. I have to for work. But it's been years since an upgrade came out and when you open the new version it runs snappier. I guess they could say "We've done all we can on that front". But in every software company I've worked at there is always ways to make things run faster and better. It just takes the dedication of resources. Adobe mainly wants to add things that cost their customers more money. They don't want to improve what they already have. 
    Welcome to the wonderful world of adobe. Sparse, bloated updates just so they can meet their end of the bargain. Stop using their products. It’s that simple. Very few professionals out there are master class experts that use all the features photoshop or illustrator has to offer and they can do everything with other products.





  • Reply 11 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,515member
    chabig said:
    So essentially...a font store.
    Adobe's MBAs must sit around all day trying to think up more schemes.
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