Apple axes Back to My Mac in macOS Mojave

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 51
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,323administrator
    Isn’t this directly tied to the discontinuation of the Airport routers? Wasn’t BTMM basically designed to work seamlessly with Airports? Without the Airport backbone, it would have to be rebuilt from the ground up in order to “just work.” So it was dead the moment the Airports were discontinued?
    It worked without the AirPort, with most fully compliant uPNP routers -- but not all of them.
  • Reply 42 of 51
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,330member
    svencito said:
    That's just great. The only good feature (aside from sharing calendar) is being removed. That just means not upgrading to Mojave (as I need none of the 90+ new 'features') or switching to other platforms. :-(

    I literally don't know a single person that uses "back to my Mac", and as a heavy Mac user for the past 20 years, I've never used it. But yeah, conveniently it's now suddenly the "only good feature" since it's being removed.

    You're completely full of shit. 


  • Reply 43 of 51
    slurpy said:
    svencito said:
    That's just great. The only good feature (aside from sharing calendar) is being removed. That just means not upgrading to Mojave (as I need none of the 90+ new 'features') or switching to other platforms. :-(

    I literally don't know a single person that uses "back to my Mac", and as a heavy Mac user for the past 20 years, I've never used it. But yeah, conveniently it's now suddenly the "only good feature" since it's being removed.

    You're completely full of shit. 


    I use it all the time. Mostly to grab files from the RAID hanging off the machine at home, but not just that. I have a mini that I use strictly as a server for iTunes content and for rendering and transcoding projects. I use Back to My Mac to check on the progress of projects, and if a task is complete I can start the next one so it doesn't have to wait until I get home.

    I'll look into what's available for alternatives before I freak out, but "cloud storage"doesn't seem like a good replacement for a 16TB storage device that's already paid for, nor does it allow me to control the machine at home.
    fastasleepwilliamlondonmarklark
  • Reply 44 of 51
    Apple Remote Desktop is horrendous. It takes an age to connect, and navigating the remote Mac computer is nigh on impossible with an Apple Magic Trackpad 2. I have to use a wired mouse to move the cursor around, especially when I'm remotely trying to scroll up or down inside a long document. ARD is also very expensive when compared to Windows Remote Desktop (which performs far better, is quicker to load, seamless to navigate) as the latter is FREE and makes working on a remote PC no different to being sat in front of it. With correctly installed drivers, WRD also handles the Magic Trackpad 2 inputs with no lag. ARD has been around for years and little improvement has been made to its core performance. It is slow, buggy, and overly complex for day-day use.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 45 of 51
    Is this Apple Corp. giving a nod and a wink to frustrated and vexed governments who want Apple to relax security or (better) give them a direct access backdoor? By leaving remote access security to third parties (many of whom would be protected under the umbrella of "National Security" and could actually be security software developers on government pay-rolls), when a government department or foreign state gain access to a Mac users data, Apple can simply say to customers and the media "...it wasn't Apple who let the Russian/USA/EU/UK/Israel security services gain access your data...You should have taken more of an active roll in researching how to secure your Mac from people who don't respect your privacy...like, cough, cough...we at Apple do". Thus protecting a sham "Boo nasty Government", "Power to the People" trope.
    williamlondonarthurba
  • Reply 46 of 51
    bigmac2bigmac2 Posts: 639member
    I'm really really confused about all of this...

    Back to my Mac was essentially a DynDNS solution piped thru a VPN to made any mac bind to the account reachable even behind a firewall.  For me Back to my Mac wasn't a screen sharing solution or a merely file sharing, it's way to reach any IPv6 service (AFP, VNC, SSH, LDAP, etc) on a remote computer thru its bonjour name. 
    arthurba
  • Reply 47 of 51
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    THAT'S what Back to My Mac was? I toyed around with setting up a VPN so I can access files on my home network remotely. I hadn't realized this was available out of the box.
    I never knew what it was either.
  • Reply 48 of 51
    Back to my Mac hasn’t worked reliably for me for a long time, so I’ve been off it for a while. For remote desktop, I’ve found TeamViewer to be a good cross platform solution. Dropbox serves to let me share important files across machines.
  • Reply 49 of 51
    lkrupp said:
    Security? More likely redundancy like the article surmises. I never used it personally but that’s just me.
    There is nothing redundant about back to my mac. It is totally unique and is not at all file sharing or screen sharing. Back to my mac is a service that allows two mac's that are both registered with the same AppleID to be able to find each other over the internet and create a secure VPN tunnel between them. Once that tunnel is established, you can use file sharing or screen sharing. Back to my mac is a zero configuration VPN Tunneling service that works like magic. Let apple know it is not ok to kill this off. https://www.apple.com/feedback/icloud.html
    fastasleep
  • Reply 50 of 51
    Anachr0n said:
    Apples free solutions are view only. I don’t need unattended access, just co-navigating. 

    Try talking your aging parents through a change in system settings when you can see their screen but not control their mouse.  “click the blue OK button... No No No, not he Cancel button!” *facepalm*
    This is simply wrong! Back to my mac gives you full control of the other mac but it was designed to control only your own mac's and you had to understand how things worked to use it to support family. In those cases you needed to create a login for you that you connected to your iCloud account through. Then those systems will also show up on your system.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 51 of 51
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,847member
    puggsly said:
    lkrupp said:
    Security? More likely redundancy like the article surmises. I never used it personally but that’s just me.
    There is nothing redundant about back to my mac. It is totally unique and is not at all file sharing or screen sharing. Back to my mac is a service that allows two mac's that are both registered with the same AppleID to be able to find each other over the internet and create a secure VPN tunnel between them. Once that tunnel is established, you can use file sharing or screen sharing. Back to my mac is a zero configuration VPN Tunneling service that works like magic. Let apple know it is not ok to kill this off. https://www.apple.com/feedback/icloud.html
    I left feedback, including details about how it miraculously works connecting to my mini which is on a VPN with a *shared IP* which software like Screens can't even figure its way around, yet BTMM works. I'm going to be sad when this dies.
    marklark
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