Apple's Tim Cook likely to reap $120M in shares of stock on Friday because of AAPL perform...

Posted:
in General Discussion
Barring some sort of financial disaster, Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to collect stock worth a massive $120 million on Friday.

Apple's Tim Cook at the White House


Cook will get 280,000 shares for his continued work as CEO, and up to double that if Apple's stock market return in the past three years beats two thirds of the companies in the S&P 500. Apple has returned 119 percent in that timeframe, Bloomberg noted, exceeding 80 percent of S&P businesses.

Since Cook took over the CEO role in 2011 he has received annual stock handouts, originally meant to vest in two increments across the span of a decade. Two years later, Cook asked the board of directors to link a third of those shares to Apple's relative stock market performance.

The company recently became the first in the U.S. to reach a $1 trillion market cap, all but guaranteeing a large payout.

Cook would be rich with or without continued stock grants. He's estimated to be worth $700 million, and receives a $3 million annual salary -- which, last year, was supplemented by a $9.33 million bonus.

Like some other high-profile businessmen, Cook has promised to donate most of his money to charity. Earlier this week he gifted 23,215 shares, worth just under $5 million, to an unidentified organization.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Good for him.
    netmageyojimbo007
  • Reply 2 of 11
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,334member
    High performers deserve the compensation.
    netmageyojimbo007
  • Reply 3 of 11
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,473member
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    entropys
  • Reply 4 of 11
    FolioFolio Posts: 600member
    Of course the crazy thing is, despite many years of generous salary and stock compensation, this nowhere near qualifies him for the Forbes list. He's still near a pauper compared to the founders of Tech Titans, or even the founders of Snap, WhatsApp, etc etc.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    The CEO of a giant multinational corporation like Apple gets rich. He is a one-percenter.

    Surprise?
  • Reply 6 of 11
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Ironically the excessive compensation for Apple
    is limited to corporate and upper management of retail. The brunt of Apple's retail arm does not make as much as you would think comparatively and there is a lot of high turnover in good retail employees because of this. 
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,730member
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Or maybe it’s because folk are buying less PCs in general. 
    netmage
  • Reply 8 of 11
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,334member
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Giving away money will get one praise, but it's the dumbest possible use of wealth, IMO.

    Imagine micro-loan funding 10,000 or 100,000 small businesses instead and the lasting impact THAT would leave on the world (if you're into that kind of thing).
    dewmeolsjony0
  • Reply 9 of 11
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,109member
    Rayz2016 said:
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Or maybe it’s because folk are buying less PCs in general. 
    Also the 2018 MBP will be in next quarter's results, whereas the 2017 came out a month earlier so was in Q3 results. 
  • Reply 10 of 11
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Giving away money will get one praise, but it's the dumbest possible use of wealth, IMO.

    Imagine micro-loan funding 10,000 or 100,000 small businesses instead and the lasting impact THAT would leave on the world (if you're into that kind of thing).


    Wasn't that what Planet of the Apps was about?

    (tongue firmly in cheek).

  • Reply 11 of 11
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,334member
    zoetmb said:
    Well, at least he's donating most of his money to charity.   I give him and Gates kudos for that.

    But I think excessive compensation at Apple and other companies warps perception of consumer pricing.   When salaries of many workers are so high and most live within the bubble of similarly compensated tech workers, pricing a phone at $1000 or a MacBook Pro at $4000 (with upgrades) doesn't seem out of line, because they can easily afford it.    But IMO, it distorts their perception of what the larger public can afford.   Let's not forget that average household income in the  U.S. is still only about $55,000 a year.  

    Apple had a great 3rd quarter, but Mac sales were down 13.3% as compared to the same quarter previous fiscal.   Maybe pricing has something to do with that.  
    Giving away money will get one praise, but it's the dumbest possible use of wealth, IMO.

    Imagine micro-loan funding 10,000 or 100,000 small businesses instead and the lasting impact THAT would leave on the world (if you're into that kind of thing).


    Wasn't that what Planet of the Apps was about?

    (tongue firmly in cheek).

    What... the talking apes were denied loans, they rebelled and overthrew their oppressive lenders?
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