Intel's newly launched 8th-generation processors could power refreshed MacBook and MacBook...

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Intel has revealed a collection of six U-series and Y-series processors in its 8th-generation lineup, with the group of notebook-oriented processors touting low operating temperatures and Gigabit Wi-Fi speeds, making them good candidates for use in a future MacBook or MacBook Air.




Unveiled at IFA 2018, the six chips are split between the U-series "Whiskey Lake" chips and Y-series "Amber Lake" families, with the former aimed at mid-range notebooks, while the latter is meant for ultra light-weight notebooks and tablets.

The U-series is headed up by the quad-core i7-8565U, which has a base clock of 1.8GHz rising to 4.6GHz under boost, and an 8-megabyte cache. It is joined by the quad-core i5-8265U clocked at 1.6GHz unboosted and 3.9GHz boosted, with 6 megabytes of cache, and the i3-8145U, a dual-core processor with a base clock of 2.1GHz, 3.9GHz boosted, and a 4-megabyte cache.

These three processors have integrated Gigabit Wi-Fi support, allowing them to connect at high speeds to supported local AC wireless networks. The chips also include support for Dolby Vision HDR and Dolby Atmos audio, and are claimed to be so power efficient that a notebook using them could last for up to 16 hours on a single charge, or up to 19 hours on a power-optimized system.

Intel has also included a new audio DSP, which can allow the U-series processors to work with digital assistants properly, including Cortana and Alexa.




The Y-series chips include the i7-8500 and i5-8200Y dual-core processors, with each offering 1.5GHz and 1.3GHz base clock speeds, and 4.2GHz and 3.9GHz maximum clock speeds respectively. Lastly, the m3-8100Y has a base clock of 1.1GHz that can boost to 3.4GHz.

While the Y-series chips do not have as many of the new features as the U-series, they do retain the Intel Wireless-AC support for Gigabit Wi-Fi speeds, along with eSIM support when used with Intel's Gigabit LTE modems.

All of the processors run quite cool, with the U-series said to have a Thermal Design Power of 15 watts, while the Y-series is set at 5 watts. These make both ranges extremely attractive to notebook vendors, with the Y-series believed to enable thin and light designs less than 7 millimeters thick.

Neither of the two series would be real candidates for use in the MacBook Pro line, partly due to the lack of LPDDR4 support that would allow Apple to use the lower-powered memory instead of DDR4 memory. The low TDP and the audio DSP used in the U-series has the potential to be used in a MacBook or MacBook Air refresh, though it would require Intel to keep to its production schedules rather than delaying the release of the chips.

Intel claims notebooks and 2-in-1s using the new U-series and Y-series processors will be available starting this fall.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    I am not clear why this U series would be good for MacBook Air if it doesn't support LPDDR4. MBA currently uses LPDDR3.  Wouldn't a low TDP system need low power RAM, even more so than the Pro model?
    edited August 2018 Avieshek
  • Reply 2 of 17
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,178member
    Is the TDP rating at base-clock?  If so, how often does turbo boost kick in?

    I hope Apple does something better than bump to these.  They really seem to be doing everything in their power to prove their detractors right.
    Avieshek
  • Reply 3 of 17
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,007member
    Performance wise how this Core i5-8265U compares to i5-8259(13" Macbook Pro) ? Since Apple skipped to upgrade 2018 upgrade to Function Keys Macbook Pro, it may be good idea for Apple to take i5-8259 and put into upcoming 13" Macbook. It is face saving for Apple to deprive customers for not upgrading 13" Function Keys Macbook Pro.
  • Reply 4 of 17
    anomeanome Posts: 1,297member

    I wonder what impact this has on Apple's new product announcements. We know they've been working on something in the MacBook/MacBook Air space, and they must have known in advance about the new cpus coming. Have they had them long enough to be ready to go to market with updated products before, say, October? They used to work closely with Intel on this stuff, but I've had the impression they're not as close anymore.

  • Reply 5 of 17
    urashid said:
    I am not clear why this U series would be good for MacBook Air if it doesn't support LPDDR4. MBA currently uses LPDDR3.  Wouldn't a low TDP system need low power RAM, even more so than the Pro model?
    All of the chips support LPDDR3 (1.1v) which is low power RAM.

    Non low power RAM is DDR3 or DDR4.


    edited August 2018
  • Reply 6 of 17
    Does anybody know if the 8th gen Y-series "Amber Lake" include Thunderbolt on the die, or does it still require a separate controller chip?
    Avieshek
  • Reply 7 of 17
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 928member
    Does anybody know if the 8th gen Y-series "Amber Lake" include Thunderbolt on the die, or does it still require a separate controller chip?
    Anandtech states: " Intel also states that these new parts also have support for Thunderbolt, even to the extent of including it in the chipset block diagram, despite not actually being part of the chipset (you still need a TB controller)."

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/13275/intel-launches-whiskey-lake-amber-lake
    philboogie
  • Reply 8 of 17
    I really don't want to buy new hardware until Meltdown/Spectre etc. are fixed in the microcode.  Looking at other reviews it seems like these new processors have some performance tweaks so the patches run better, but it's minor.  Going OT: I do wonder if that's why the Mac Pro is still so far off - Apple want to wait for silicon that is properly fixed. 
    h4y3sAvieshekwilliamlondon
  • Reply 9 of 17
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    I hate Intel. Apple should make their own chips. Intel sucks.
    Avieshek
  • Reply 10 of 17
    Does anybody know if the 8th gen Y-series "Amber Lake" include Thunderbolt on the die, or does it still require a separate controller chip?
    From what I hear, no, it does not. Someone was complaining about this on Ars.
    Avieshek
  • Reply 11 of 17
    It would be pretty cool to see Apple use either the Intel/AMD Vega APU or a Ryzen2/Vega equivalent in the new MB Air. They could include 12GB of RAM with 4GB dynamically assigned to the GPU on-demand. That should really up the graphics performance of that laptop range without destroying the thermal and price caps.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    AppleInsider said:
    The low TDP and the audio DSP used in the U-series has the potential to be used in a MacBook or MacBook Air refresh
    The MacBook refresh would presumably use the Y-series. 
  • Reply 13 of 17
    foljsfoljs Posts: 345member
    nunzy said:
    I hate Intel. Apple should make their own chips. Intel sucks.
    Compared to what? Non-chips or the imaginary chips Apple would make?

    Remember when Apple used custom chips (with IBM and co) and they couldn't deliver new faster/cooler CPUs while the PC world moved on?

    At least by going with Intel you're at worst at the same fate as the rest of the industry.
    nunzy
  • Reply 14 of 17
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,871administrator
    Does anybody know if the 8th gen Y-series "Amber Lake" include Thunderbolt on the die, or does it still require a separate controller chip?
    From what I hear, no, it does not. Someone was complaining about this on Ars.
    It does not. TB3 would still be off the PCH, and with only 10 PCI-E channels, that's a pretty tight environment.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    deminsddeminsd Posts: 143member
    What is the technical issue that keeps Intel from supporting LPDDR4 on these new CPU's? Is there some sort of physics or "just because"?
  • Reply 16 of 17
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,058member
    Still absent is a combination of 15W and Iris Plus for the nTB MBP 13. Guess that model skips an update for the september event at least. 
  • Reply 17 of 17
    nunzy said:
    I hate Intel. Apple should make their own chips. Intel sucks.
    Progress is not built on hate. Keep your fillings to yourself. I take anything that is solid and fast for processing for my work. I do not care who makes this. If Apple lowers levels to wher Microsoft was some years ago I am jump abandong that ship and moving forward with whoever gives better. Hatred does not drive my life, but solution that I choose as more convenient (not manufacturer that tells me how I should work).
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