Adoption of iOS 11 reaches 85 percent ahead of release of iOS 12

Posted:
in iOS edited September 4
New data published to Apple's developer website reveals iOS 11 has been installed on 85 percent of iPhones and iPads, showing it to have been adopted by the vast majority of compatible devices just before the expected release of its replacement, iOS 12.




According to Apple's own data, as measured by the App Store on September 3, 85 percent of all observed devices ran a variant of iOS 11. Of the remaining iOS 11-compatible devices, iOS 10 is still used by 10 percent of the device population.

The chart advises five percent of observed hardware ran earlier versions of iOS, but did not break the figure down further. The iOS 11 adoption rate is an improvement from the 76 percent declared in April, which also reported 19 percent of devices running iOS 10, and 5 percent using earlier versions.

While the data does not advise how many devices are measured in each case, the proportion change since April suggests iOS 11 improved its share by owners of iOS 10 devices upgrading to the newer operating system. It is also plausible for the change to be contributed to users upgrading their older iPhones and iPads for newer models running iOS 11 by default.

The change in proportion also seems to show a slower uptake of iOS 11 than compared to the change between the April results and those released in January, where iOS 11 had a 65-percent share, iOS 10 had 28 percent, and "earlier" versions was at 7 percent. Given the differences in time between the measurements, as well as the late stage in the operating system cycle, it is to be expected for the most recent results to show a "slower" migration rate.






Apple is currently performing beta testing of its next milestone operating system, iOS 12, which is expected to be released soon after the company's "Gather Round" 2018 iPhone event on September 12. The new iOS version will be introducing "Digital Health" features to help users monitor how they spend time in apps, new versions of stock apps, Siri shortcuts, MeMoji, and a number of other improvements in the release.

While iOS 11 may not have been as fast as iOS 10 for adoption, iOS 12 may see wider adoption, as Apple has included some changes to make the release better for those with older devices. While newer devices are expect to receive all of the benefits of the release, iOS 12 also has performance improvements made specifically with earlier iPhones and iPads in mind, which could tempt more users to update earlier than in previous generations.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    How is 85% low for 11 months?
    lolliver
  • Reply 2 of 20
    That’s an outstanding number for adoption.
    lolliverbb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 20
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 610member
    I’m still trying to figure out what the purpose of iOS 11 was. There wasn’t much in the way of new features, more just incremental evolution, and even after 11 months iOS 11 is still quite buggy on my 6s. I’d rather they debug the current version than come out with a new one. 
    jeffharrisbb-15
  • Reply 4 of 20
    dws-2dws-2 Posts: 194member
    MplsP said:
    I’m still trying to figure out what the purpose of iOS 11 was. There wasn’t much in the way of new features, more just incremental evolution, and even after 11 months iOS 11 is still quite buggy on my 6s. I’d rather they debug the current version than come out with a new one. 
    I think iOS 12 is meant to be sort of a debug release. From what I hear, that's the case, because a lot of beta testers are saying the beta releases of iOS 12 are more stable than iOS 11 is after almost a year of fixes. It's also supposed to be a lot faster on older phones such as yours.

    I'm interested to see whether adoption of iOS 12 is significantly faster than iOS 11 because it's supposed to be such a better release.
    caladanianbb-15netmagewatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 20
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    Android fanboys don't care if their OS is up to date. That's why they get viruses.
    edited September 4 watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 20
    Bob SpauldingBob Spaulding Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    11 has been the buggiest release ever and I'd venture to say 12 will be the same. Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea.
  • Reply 7 of 20
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,858member
    dws-2 said:
    MplsP said:
    I’m still trying to figure out what the purpose of iOS 11 was. There wasn’t much in the way of new features, more just incremental evolution, and even after 11 months iOS 11 is still quite buggy on my 6s. I’d rather they debug the current version than come out with a new one. 
    I think iOS 12 is meant to be sort of a debug release. From what I hear, that's the case, because a lot of beta testers are saying the beta releases of iOS 12 are more stable than iOS 11 is after almost a year of fixes. It's also supposed to be a lot faster on older phones such as yours.

    I'm interested to see whether adoption of iOS 12 is significantly faster than iOS 11 because it's supposed to be such a better release.


    iOS 11 had a number of new iPad features!!!

    I'm not running iOS12 Beta on my iPad as of a week ago. You're going to think the same thing. There's a number of things. I think Siri Shortcuts will be big for example. But there's nothing really in your face NEW about iOS12. There's small changes here and there. The interface works like it does on the iPhone X. You can do things either way as there's still a Home Button on current iPads, but it's just another clue of having FaceID on new iPads and no more Home Button or TouchID.

    I've had this wield random freezing issue on my iPad for a long time, but since iOS12, It hasn't done that to me anymore. Is that fixed under this OS? To early to tell, but so far, so good. I think it's now a good time to run the Public Beta of iOS12 on your Non-Primary device. So your iPad. It's gone though a lot of Beta's.
    edited September 4 watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    The only thing that will get me to iOS 11 is my expectation of Apple not testing the "iOS 10 to iOS 12" update process.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,681member
    11 has been the buggiest release ever and I'd venture to say 12 will be the same. Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea.
    Show me the data, please. 
    lollivernetmagelamboaudi4watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 10 of 20
    The adoption rate would be a lot higher, but Apple requires WiFi to download updates.  A lot of people never use WiFi on their phone...
  • Reply 11 of 20
    11 has been the buggiest release ever and I'd venture to say 12 will be the same. Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea.

    The iOS 12 beta releases have been the least buggy iOS betas I have tested. So I venture to say you have no idea what you're talking about.
    netmagelamboaudi4watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    I predict iOS 12 will be one of the fastest cycles for updaters. The betas have outperformed iOS 11 from beta 1 in general use.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,681member
    The adoption rate would be a lot higher, but Apple requires WiFi to download updates.  A lot of people never use WiFi on their phone...
    Really good point. Perhaps Apple should come up with a chunking protocol to allow large updates to be updated incrementally over slower or metered connections. Customers who are not updating due to data caps (or Apple's imposed update size limits) could spread the cost of the update over a longer time frame. This is not a perfect solution but it may be preferable to sitting on an outdated version forever, especially if there is a security issue involved. 

    I also wish that I could override Apple's backward compatibility limitations with respect to hardware. I may decide that I'm willing to live with some user experience issues to get iOS 12 installed on older devices, assuming there aren't any microcode, machine code, or assembly level limitations in play with the older hardware. If it's a user experience issue, maybe I'm more tolerant than Apple thinks I am. Let me decide...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 20
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 610member
    dewme said:
    11 has been the buggiest release ever and I'd venture to say 12 will be the same. Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea.
    Show me the data, please. 
    How does that matter? The only 'data' for this would be from apple, which they would never publish, so you are asking for the impossible. Anecdotally, I have seen *many* people echo similar sentiments about the number of bugs in iOS 11. I still have issues with my camera, the texting app and other glitches at least a couple times a week.


  • Reply 15 of 20
    The adoption rate would be a lot higher, but Apple requires WiFi to download updates.  A lot of people never use WiFi on their phone...
    Why use a phone at all then?
    netmage
  • Reply 16 of 20
    The adoption rate would be a lot higher, but Apple requires WiFi to download updates.  A lot of people never use WiFi on their phone...
    Why use a phone at all then?
    what a bizarre question. I prefer NOT to use Wi-Fi on my phone because it's so slow, where I work there is no fibre access and the broadband speed is a paltry 8mbps at best. However I get a brilliant 4G signal on my phone and have practically unlimited data with Vodafone so I'd rather use 4G for updates and large apps - Apple doesn't allow this for whatever crazy reason. I get that mobile data is expensive in the US and Wi-Fi is ubiquitous but in other countries it can be quite the opposite and Apple should at least allow the option.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,681member
    MplsP said:
    dewme said:
    11 has been the buggiest release ever and I'd venture to say 12 will be the same. Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea.
    Show me the data, please. 
    How does that matter? The only 'data' for this would be from apple, which they would never publish, so you are asking for the impossible. Anecdotally, I have seen *many* people echo similar sentiments about the number of bugs in iOS 11. I still have issues with my camera, the texting app and other glitches at least a couple times a week.


    Buggiest ever implies that an objective comparison has been done and the results are conclusive. Data always matters - unless you are putting forth an opinion or describing your personal experience with a sample size of one (1). There are hundreds of millions of iOS users and one opinion does not speak for hundreds of millions. If you've got an opinion, state it as such, but don't try to pass it off as fact unless you've got the data to prove it.

    Regarding "Software released on a time frame vs when it is ready is always a bad idea."... you and Apple are in total agreement. This is exactly why Group Facetime didn't make the cut for the first release of iOS 12. It's not ready, so it's not being released.
    edited September 5 watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 20
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,554member
    When annoying pop-up keep forcing you to upgrade and on top, one can not go back to older IOS version is key for such large number current version IOS adoption.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    Exactly! It is really annoying when they auto download and you have to update in order to free that space up. UGH
  • Reply 20 of 20
    And I still regret updating my iPhone 6. Ever since, it has been sooooo slooooow. 
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