Canon enters full-frame mirrorless market with EOS R and four new lenses

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in General Discussion
Canon has introduced the new EOS R full-frame mirrorless DSLR and quartet of lenses to compete with the likes of Nikon and Sony in what has quickly become a very heated camera market.

Canon EOS R Mirrorless Digital Camera System


On the heels of Nikon's announcement featuring the full-frame mirrorless Z6 and Z7, Canon has fired back with a compact shooter of its own.

The EOS R is the first full-frame mirrorless for Canon, and launched alongside four lenses and several lens adapters.

Unlike Nikon, who introduced a more entry-level model as well as a higher end, Canon opted for a single camera that appears somewhere in the middle. It sports a 30.3 megapixel sensor, situated between the Nikon Z6's 24.5 and the Z7's 45.7.

It has an ISO range of 100-40,000 and is capable of 8 frames per second of continuous shooting. Sony's A7 III is capable of 10 frames per second while Nikon's Z6 can handle 12 frames per second.





The EOS R is capable of 4K30 video, and full 1080p at 60 frames per second. For storage, Canon is relying on a single UHS-II SD card slot.

On the rear is a 3.15-inch fully articulated touch LCD screen and has a 3.69 million pixel Quad VGA OLED EVF.

Canon EOS R Digital Camera


Canon has four lenses available at launch, including a 28-70mm f/2, a 50mm f/1.2, a 35mm f/1.8 macro, and a 24-105mm f/4. There are also different adapters available as well which make older lenses compatible such as the EF lens line.

Other important specs include the IFIC 8 image processor, dual-pixel autofocus with built-in eye-tracking, 5655 total autofocus points, and EV -6 low light focus capabilities.

All three of the major camera producers have entered the full-frame mirrorless DSLR market.

Pricing and availability

Canon's latest lineup will be available in October, running $2,299 for the body only. Bundling the 25-105mm f/4 lens brings it to $3,399.

Preorders for the EOS R Mirrorless Camera System, however, start earlier at 12:01 a.m. Eastern on Sept. 12 at Adorama and B&H Photo. In addition to the camera body and kit, both retailers will also be taking preorders for four RF lenses, EF-mount super telephoto lenses and accessories.

Stay tuned for AppleInsider's full review once the Canon EOS R is available.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    technotechno Posts: 670member
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 23
    techno said:
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    No, unfortunately when it comes to prosumer interchangeable lenses, full frame is as close to the complete opposite of micro 4/3's as you can get- Full frame refers to the sensor size (equivalent to 35mm film) below that is the APS-C sized sensor which is on cameras from Fuji and many consumer DSLRs, smaller than that is micro 4/3's the 4/3's refers to 1 and 1/3 inch diagonal of the sensor size.

    So no the lenses for the EOS R would have a mount size far bigger than that of a 4/3's. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 23
    Nikon Z6 looks apealing to me! Will be interesting to see if Olympus follows into the mirrorless full frame market.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,850member
    techno said:
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    Full frame always means the equivalent of a 35mm frame. About 24x36mm.

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger, but have far higher image quality. It will take some time, but it will happen. Both Sony and Canon’s APS-C mirrorless offerings are pretty small and light and have themselves eaten into the 4/3 market. They also offer higher quality IQ. What they don’t have as yet, is large native lens lineups. But they’ll get there.
    philboogiewatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 23
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,602member
    techno said:
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    The Micro 4/3 market is quite mature now. I haven't looked at the lens situation in a while but you should be able to get almost anything to suit your requirements and have a few options. The more the better though of course. Sadly, I haven't been able to get out with my cameras for a couple of years (also Micro 4/3 and including a Lumix G1)
  • Reply 6 of 23
    ajmasajmas Posts: 547member
    While pitched as a still camera, I can’t help wonder that video is a large part of the target audience?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 23
    ajmas said:
    While pitched as a still camera, I can’t help wonder that video is a large part of the target audience?
    Always, these days.

    UHD 4K Video Recording and Canon Log Gamma 


    Designed for multimedia image-maker, the EOS R supports UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution recording at up to 30 fps at 480 Mb/s, along with Full HD 1080p shooting at 60 fps and HD 720p at 120 fps for slow motion playback. When recording in-camera, 4K video has 4:2:2 sampling and 8-bit color depth, a 4:2:2 10-bit clean output in ITU-R CT.2020 is possible when using an external recorder.

    Integrated Canon Log also allows users to capture flat images with an improved dynamic range of 800%, or 12 stops. This function makes it easier to match cameras in post-production as well as provides the most latitude and potential for color grading. For monitoring, a View Assist function is available, which emulates a graded look for more accurate viewing on the camera's LCD.

    Audio can be recorded using the on-board stereo microphone or an optional external mic can also be used via the 3.5mm mic jack.
    edited September 5 watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 23
    Doesn't interest me since I've been invested in Nikon for many years. Interesting that they have "multiple adapters" for older Canon lenses while Nikon has a single adapter for their Z6/Z7. I wonder if this gives Canon an advantage by having adapters specifically for different sets of lenses that might be better optimized vs the single Nikon adapter.

    The good thing is both Canon and Nikon have jumped into this market. Which should hopefully bring about a whole slew of new products as they try to outdo each other. Competition is good.
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,850member
    Doesn't interest me since I've been invested in Nikon for many years. Interesting that they have "multiple adapters" for older Canon lenses while Nikon has a single adapter for their Z6/Z7. I wonder if this gives Canon an advantage by having adapters specifically for different sets of lenses that might be better optimized vs the single Nikon adapter.

    The good thing is both Canon and Nikon have jumped into this market. Which should hopefully bring about a whole slew of new products as they try to outdo each other. Competition is good.
    Canon has “a” lens adapter for all of their lenses. The other two also work with all of their other lenses. The differences is that there’s a basic adapter which just allows the lens to work. There’s another one with a control to give those older mount lenses the same features as the new R mount lenses, and yet a third with the feature of changeable filters behind the lens, if you don’t want to have to buy huge filters for some large front lenses, or those, such as the 11-24mm zoom for which a front mounted filter can’t be used.
    bestkeptsecretfreethinkingStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,850member

    ajmas said:
    While pitched as a still camera, I can’t help wonder that video is a large part of the target audience?
    Always, these days.

    UHD 4K Video Recording and Canon Log Gamma 


    Designed for multimedia image-maker, the EOS R supports UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution recording at up to 30 fps at 480 Mb/s, along with Full HD 1080p shooting at 60 fps and HD 720p at 120 fps for slow motion playback. When recording in-camera, 4K video has 4:2:2 sampling and 8-bit color depth, a 4:2:2 10-bit clean output in ITU-R CT.2020 is possible when using an external recorder.

    Integrated Canon Log also allows users to capture flat images with an improved dynamic range of 800%, or 12 stops. This function makes it easier to match cameras in post-production as well as provides the most latitude and potential for color grading. For monitoring, a View Assist function is available, which emulates a graded look for more accurate viewing on the camera's LCD.

    Audio can be recorded using the on-board stereo microphone or an optional external mic can also be used via the 3.5mm mic jack.
    I just wish Canon had enabled 4K 60fps and even 1080p 120 FPS, though I think that’s less important, though both Nikon and Sony offer that in their mirrorless.
    edited September 5 iqatedowatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 23
    Apple is clearly doomed.
    retrogustocornchipraoulduke42
  • Reply 12 of 23
    melgross said:

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger
    Ah yeah you might want to rethink that...


  • Reply 13 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,850member
    hentaiboy said:
    melgross said:

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger
    Ah yeah you might want to rethink that...


    Good pick, that happens to be one of the smaller ones. But the image quality, which on 4/3 cameras I’d decent, but not great isn’t going to survive.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 23
    melgross said:
    hentaiboy said:
    melgross said:

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger
    Ah yeah you might want to rethink that...


    Good pick, that happens to be one of the smaller ones. But the image quality, which on 4/3 cameras I’d decent, but not great isn’t going to survive.
    High ISO performance on 4/3 cameras is pitiful compared to crop much less full frame. 
    philboogiewatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 23
    melgross said:
    techno said:
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    Full frame always means the equivalent of a 35mm frame. About 24x36mm.

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger, but have far higher image quality. It will take some time, but it will happen. Both Sony and Canon’s APS-C mirrorless offerings are pretty small and light and have themselves eaten into the 4/3 market. They also offer higher quality IQ. What they don’t have as yet, is large native lens lineups. But they’ll get there.
    FF mirrorless is not going to kill m4/3.  There is a growing segment of m4/3 users who have given up on FF and APS-C.  As someone who shoots Canon FF, APS-C and Olympus m4/3, there is precious little difference in image quality unless you go to extremely high ISO settings.  For most uses, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference.  The IBIS in the m4/3 lets you shoot at lower ISOs so you don't have to go as high in low light as you would with APS-C or FF.  The size and weight difference alone is worth moving to m4/3.  To go super telephoto (600 mm) with my FF rig, it weighs in at 2,465 gm.  My m4/3 equivalent rig weighs in at just 813 gm, 140 gm less than the FF body alone.  APS-C bodies as lighter than FF but the lenses are still big and heavy if they have optical IS, which is required for telephoto work.  I was originally interested in the EOS-R, as it is just a little heavier than the flagship Olympus EM-1 MII, but the lack of IBIS and outrageous price killed it for me.  I can get more capable cameras for less money from other manufacturers.  Too bad.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 23
    Those lenses look anything but compact!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 23
    Doesn't interest me since I've been invested in Nikon for many years. Interesting that they have "multiple adapters" for older Canon lenses while Nikon has a single adapter for their Z6/Z7. I wonder if this gives Canon an advantage by having adapters specifically for different sets of lenses that might be better optimized vs the single Nikon adapter.

    The good thing is both Canon and Nikon have jumped into this market. Which should hopefully bring about a whole slew of new products as they try to outdo each other. Competition is good.
    You have to remember that Canon has changed Lens mounts several times since I bought my first AE-1 in 1977. Its shutter failed just over a year later so I switched to Nikon and their mount has essentially been the same for 50+ years.
    A number of lens adapters have always been available for Nikon and Canons cameras. I've seen a number of Canon Video cameras with Nikon lenses over the last few years.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,850member
    RobBobW said:
    melgross said:
    techno said:
    Can someone tell me if this is a micro 4/3 system? I am not sure if the "full frame" has to do with that or not. As an owner of 3 micro 4/3 bodies, I would love to see more lenses come to the market.
    Full frame always means the equivalent of a 35mm frame. About 24x36mm.

    the truth is that these FF mirrorless cameras are going to kill 4/3. They are not that much bigger, but have far higher image quality. It will take some time, but it will happen. Both Sony and Canon’s APS-C mirrorless offerings are pretty small and light and have themselves eaten into the 4/3 market. They also offer higher quality IQ. What they don’t have as yet, is large native lens lineups. But they’ll get there.
    FF mirrorless is not going to kill m4/3.  There is a growing segment of m4/3 users who have given up on FF and APS-C.  As someone who shoots Canon FF, APS-C and Olympus m4/3, there is precious little difference in image quality unless you go to extremely high ISO settings.  For most uses, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference.  The IBIS in the m4/3 lets you shoot at lower ISOs so you don't have to go as high in low light as you would with APS-C or FF.  The size and weight difference alone is worth moving to m4/3.  To go super telephoto (600 mm) with my FF rig, it weighs in at 2,465 gm.  My m4/3 equivalent rig weighs in at just 813 gm, 140 gm less than the FF body alone.  APS-C bodies as lighter than FF but the lenses are still big and heavy if they have optical IS, which is required for telephoto work.  I was originally interested in the EOS-R, as it is just a little heavier than the flagship Olympus EM-1 MII, but the lack of IBIS and outrageous price killed it for me.  I can get more capable cameras for less money from other manufacturers.  Too bad.
    4/3 sales have been dropping more quickly that for other sizes, and the companies producing them are experiencing financial difficulties. Yes, they will disappear at some point.

    there is a BIG difference in image quality. In fact, when 4/3 first came out, the advertising for it said (maybe not exactly):

    the best compromise in size, weight and image quality. They knew from the start that it couldn’t compet on IQ, and that was before FF cameras came out. APS-C very much dies beat 4/3 in IQ. There’s no question about that. Bigger sensors always beat smaller sensors, whether you like it or not.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 23
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 158member
    Doesn't interest me since I've been invested in Nikon for many years. Interesting that they have "multiple adapters" for older Canon lenses while Nikon has a single adapter for their Z6/Z7. I wonder if this gives Canon an advantage by having adapters specifically for different sets of lenses that might be better optimized vs the single Nikon adapter.

    The good thing is both Canon and Nikon have jumped into this market. Which should hopefully bring about a whole slew of new products as they try to outdo each other. Competition is good.
    You have to remember that Canon has changed Lens mounts several times since I bought my first AE-1 in 1977. Its shutter failed just over a year later so I switched to Nikon and their mount has essentially been the same for 50+ years.
    A number of lens adapters have always been available for Nikon and Canons cameras. I've seen a number of Canon Video cameras with Nikon lenses over the last few years.

    The bayonet part of the Nikon F mount has remained compatible, but there are at least ten common variants which add features. Electronic contacts, mechanical focus screw, aperture plunger, indexing aperture ring. You can actually damage new cameras by mounting lenses without aperture indexing on them. Canon's mount variations have lacked direct physical compatibility, but every EF lens works on every EF camera.

    That said, I do enjoy my grandfather's Nikon F.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 23
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 158member

    Other important specs include the IFIC 8 image processor, dual-pixel autofocus with built-in eye-tracking, 5655 total autofocus points, and EV -6 low light focus capabilities.
    I briefly got excited when I saw "eye-tracking". What they actually mean is it searches the view out the lens for eyes to help optimize focus when shooting portraits.

    I was hoping they were bringing back the focus system from the EOS-3, where the camera monitored the photographer's eye to determine where in the frame it should focus. Basically it gave you the ability to pick the autofocus points by just looking at them while framing your shot. That system was incredible.
    watto_cobra
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