Apple plans to launch 5G iPhone in 2020, report says

Posted:
in iPhone edited November 2
Apple is expected to join the 5G revolution in 2020, when the company will purportedly launch an iPhone capable of taking advantage of the next-generation cellular technology, according to a report Friday.

iPhone XS Max
iPhone XS and XS Max use Intel modems


Citing a source familiar with Apple's plans, Fast Company reports Apple intends to use Intel's 5G-capable 8161 modem in an iPhone slated for release in 2020. The handset will be Apple's first product to support the fast 5G standard, which was finalized earlier this year.

Intel is developing the 8161 with a transition chip called the 8060, silicon that will be used to prototype and test 5G in iPhone, sources said. Of note, the 8161 will be fabricated using Intel's 10-nanometer process, fabrication technology that promises boosts in speed and efficiency.

Originally expected to be ready for mass manufacturing in 2016, Intel's 10nm process has seen numerous setbacks as the company tackles production snags. Late last month, interim CEO Bob Swan said progress is being made toward volume production, but the long-delayed chip technology is unlikely to be ready until 2019.

Intel is anticipated to remain Apple's sole baseband chip supplier when 5G does arrive on iPhone, though the tech giant has been "unhappy" with the chipmaker, the report says. Details were left unmentioned, though Fast Company speculates heat dissipation issues with the 8060 modem are to blame for strained relations.

As explained by the source, carriers transitioning to 5G will initially rely on millimeter-wave spectrum, a technology that places a large amount of stress on cellular modems. The higher-than-normal processing requirements generate excess heat and detracts from handset battery life, issues with which Intel is grappling.

While the problem Apple reportedly opened discussions with existing supplier MediaTek to furnish modem chips if Intel is unable to solve the problems.

Just as 4G LTE is the current standard bearer in wireless communications technology, so will 5G see rapid adoption by handset makers in the coming years. Industry stalwart Qualcomm is reportedly pushing up production of its 5G-capable chipsets in anticipation of the first major smartphone releases in 2019.

Apple is typically slow to adopt the fastest cellular standards in its iPhone line. The first iPhone, for example, launched without support for the then-cutting-edge 3G standard, while 4G LTE integration arrived somewhat late with iPhone 5 in 2012.

A 5G-capable iPhone launch in 2020 should ramp well with existing infrastructure rollout plans. Carriers are only in the very early stages of seeding their respective networks with compatible base stations, and proliferation toward widespread availability will be slow going. For example, Verizon this month delivered 5G Home, a home broadband service touted as the world's first commercial 5G deployment.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    I don’t think 5G will be super popular with cellphones in the beginning. As we develop new experiences and tech, demand will rise, but right now I don’t see why you would need access to 1 gigabit connection in you pocket? Plus as tricky 5G as a technology, even when it becomes widely available, it’ll be like the icing on the cake to have it.
  • Reply 2 of 34
    I'd rather see Apple settle their lawsuit with Qualcomm and go back to using their modems.  Their cellular modems are far ahead of anyone else.
    qwwerabluefire1williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 3 of 34
    What does this sentence mean?:

    "While the problem Apple reportedly opened discussions with existing supplier MediaTek to furnish modem chips if Intel is unable to solve the problems."

    I miss proofreading. :neutral: 
    edited November 2 tokyojimublurpbleepbloopmike1bonobobRayz2016williamlondonStrangeDaysmuthuk_vanalingamcornchippscooter63
  • Reply 4 of 34
    Yeah,  and who's going to finance this with rising phone service prices and data plans?   The public?
  • Reply 5 of 34
    Q: Which "5G"?

    A wireless voice and data standard defined by the Third Generation Partnership Program (3GPP)?
    Release 15, 5G specifications
    Release 16, IMT-2020 submission for an initial full 3GPP 5G system

    A vague marketing term that doesn't necessarily qualify as adhering to the real "5G" standard?
    Verizon Launches Proprietary 5G Fixed Wireless Service

    A: Yes.
    As with "4G", there's a difference between the standard and what is implemented by the various companies involved. IOW: Baloney ahead. Be careful what you're actually buying. I find it useful to keep an eye on the changing history, description and specifications of 5G provided at Wikipedia:
    5G@Wikipedia

    Meanwhile:
    a) There's "5G NR" (New Radio), a preliminary standard from last December, being 'deployed' at a few places around the world. Whether these implementations will work within the finished standard is uncertain.
    b) There's Verizon's 'proprietary 5G', referred to in a link above, whatever that is. 
    c) Testing continues of contrasting 5G send and receive hardware implementations in the field.
    d) Health problems potentially caused by exposure to 5G EM frequencies have become of critical concern.

    Regarding health problems, just yesterday the National Institute of Health was at last allowed to release a report from their US National Toxicology Program (NTP) proving that wireless radiation is a Class 1 Human Carcinogen
    $25 Million NIH Study Proves Wireless Technology Causes Cancer and DNA Damage - US Brain Tumor Association.com

    “The $25 million US National Toxicology Program Study has proven again what other studies have shown us that wireless radiation is a Class 1 Human Carcinogen like cigarette smoke and asbestos and should be treated as such. The NTP study proved wireless radiation can cause cancer and it can damage our DNA which can lead to a host of serious diseases. We must warn people and minimize exposure. I along with more than 200 of my colleagues who are expert in the field have called for a moratorium on the roll out of 5G which promises to maximize our exposure to harmful wireless radiation...."

    I added bolding for emphasis.

    Conclusion: 5G has problems.
    We're certainly not going to see the real thing in 2019. We may not see it in 2020. Considering the health implications, we may not see real 5G at all.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 251member
    ...and intel will also have their multi-yeared delayed 10nm chips out by 2020. Good Job on continued use of Intel Apple!
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 7 of 34
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,679member
    qwwera said:
    ...and intel will also have their multi-yeared delayed 10nm chips out by 2020. Good Job on continued use of Intel Apple!
    I thought Intel said their 10nm processors will be out 2H of 2019?
  • Reply 8 of 34
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 251member
    qwwera said:
    ...and intel will also have their multi-yeared delayed 10nm chips out by 2020. Good Job on continued use of Intel Apple!
    I thought Intel said their 10nm processors will be out 2H of 2019?
    That’s what they are saying now, but originally they lauded it was 2016
    JWSC
  • Reply 9 of 34
    M68000 said:
    Yeah,  and who's going to finance this with rising phone service prices and data plans?   The public?
    The same people that finance Apple’s rising ASP
    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamJWSC
  • Reply 10 of 34
    Apple is expected to join the 5G revolution in 2020, when the company will purportedly launch an iPhone capable of taking advantage of the next-generation cellular technology, according to a report Friday.

    iPhone XS Max
    iPhone XS and XS Max use Intel modems


    Citing a source familiar with Apple's plans, Fast Company reports Apple intends to use Intel's 5G-capable 8161 modem in an iPhone slated for release in 2020. The handset will be Apple's first product to support the fast 5G standard, which was finalized earlier this year.

    Intel is developing the 8161 with a transition chip called the 8060, silicon that will be used to prototype and test 5G in iPhone, sources said. Of note, the 8161 will be fabricated using Intel's 10-nanometer process, fabrication technology that promises boosts in speed and efficiency.

    Originally expected to be ready for mass manufacturing in 2016, Intel's 10nm process has seen numerous setbacks as the company tackles production snags. Late last month, interim CEO Bob Swan said progress is being made toward volume production, but the long-delayed chip technology is unlikely to be ready until 2019.

    Intel is anticipated to remain Apple's sole baseband chip supplier when 5G does arrive on iPhone, though the tech giant has been "unhappy" with the chipmaker, the report says. Details were left unmentioned, though Fast Company speculates heat dissipation issues with the 8060 modem are to blame for strained relations.

    As explained by the source, carriers transitioning to 5G will initially rely on millimeter-wave spectrum, a technology that places a large amount of stress on cellular modems. The higher-than-normal processing requirements generate excess heat and detracts from handset battery life, issues with which Intel is grappling.

    While the problem Apple reportedly opened discussions with existing supplier MediaTek to furnish modem chips if Intel is unable to solve the problems.

    Just as 4G LTE is the current standard bearer in wireless communications technology, so will 5G see rapid adoption by handset makers in the coming years. Industry stalwart Qualcomm is reportedly pushing up production of its 5G-capable chipsets in anticipation of the first major smartphone releases in 2019.

    Apple is typically slow to adopt the fastest cellular standards in its iPhone line. The first iPhone, for example, launched without support for the then-cutting-edge 3G standard, while 4G LTE integration arrived somewhat late with iPhone 5 in 2012.

    A 5G-capable iPhone launch in 2020 should ramp well with existing infrastructure rollout plans. Carriers are only in the very early stages of seeding their respective networks with compatible base stations, and proliferation toward widespread availability will be slow going. For example, Verizon this month delivered 5G Home, a home broadband service touted as the world's first commercial 5G deployment.
    How fast is 5G??!
  • Reply 11 of 34
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,468member
    M68000 said:
    Yeah,  and who's going to finance this with rising phone service prices and data plans?   The public?
    Who else is there?
    GeorgeBMacStrangeDaysJWSC
  • Reply 12 of 34
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,468member

    Apple is expected to join the 5G revolution in 2020, when the company will purportedly launch an iPhone capable of taking advantage of the next-generation cellular technology, according to a report Friday.

    iPhone XS Max
    iPhone XS and XS Max use Intel modems


    Citing a source familiar with Apple's plans, Fast Company reports Apple intends to use Intel's 5G-capable 8161 modem in an iPhone slated for release in 2020. The handset will be Apple's first product to support the fast 5G standard, which was finalized earlier this year.

    Intel is developing the 8161 with a transition chip called the 8060, silicon that will be used to prototype and test 5G in iPhone, sources said. Of note, the 8161 will be fabricated using Intel's 10-nanometer process, fabrication technology that promises boosts in speed and efficiency.

    Originally expected to be ready for mass manufacturing in 2016, Intel's 10nm process has seen numerous setbacks as the company tackles production snags. Late last month, interim CEO Bob Swan said progress is being made toward volume production, but the long-delayed chip technology is unlikely to be ready until 2019.

    Intel is anticipated to remain Apple's sole baseband chip supplier when 5G does arrive on iPhone, though the tech giant has been "unhappy" with the chipmaker, the report says. Details were left unmentioned, though Fast Company speculates heat dissipation issues with the 8060 modem are to blame for strained relations.

    As explained by the source, carriers transitioning to 5G will initially rely on millimeter-wave spectrum, a technology that places a large amount of stress on cellular modems. The higher-than-normal processing requirements generate excess heat and detracts from handset battery life, issues with which Intel is grappling.

    While the problem Apple reportedly opened discussions with existing supplier MediaTek to furnish modem chips if Intel is unable to solve the problems.

    Just as 4G LTE is the current standard bearer in wireless communications technology, so will 5G see rapid adoption by handset makers in the coming years. Industry stalwart Qualcomm is reportedly pushing up production of its 5G-capable chipsets in anticipation of the first major smartphone releases in 2019.

    Apple is typically slow to adopt the fastest cellular standards in its iPhone line. The first iPhone, for example, launched without support for the then-cutting-edge 3G standard, while 4G LTE integration arrived somewhat late with iPhone 5 in 2012.

    A 5G-capable iPhone launch in 2020 should ramp well with existing infrastructure rollout plans. Carriers are only in the very early stages of seeding their respective networks with compatible base stations, and proliferation toward widespread availability will be slow going. For example, Verizon this month delivered 5G Home, a home broadband service touted as the world's first commercial 5G deployment.
    How fast is 5G??!
    Faster than 4G but slower than 6G. 
    StrangeDaysmikeybabescornchippscooter63JWSC
  • Reply 13 of 34
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,468member
    The message editor used on this site is a piece of junk. Any chance of someone taking a look at it? How about retraining one of the proof readers? They don’t seem to be that busy. 
    StrangeDayscornchippscooter63JWSC
  • Reply 14 of 34
    sergioz said:
    I don’t think 5G will be super popular with cellphones in the beginning. As we develop new experiences and tech, demand will rise, but right now I don’t see why you would need access to 1 gigabit connection in you pocket? Plus as tricky 5G as a technology, even when it becomes widely available, it’ll be like the icing on the cake to have it.
    You should review the history of technology.   It is essentially a story of how milestone's like 5G trigger not ripples but tsunamis throughout the industry.  And, that seems to be particularly true with communications protocols.  

    It wasn't that long ago that we mailed magnetic tapes on 12 inch reels to each other.
  • Reply 15 of 34
    I'd rather see Apple settle their lawsuit with Qualcomm and go back to using their modems.  Their cellular modems are far ahead of anyone else.
    A business partner, like a friend, needs more than just a fancy product.   It needs to be reliable, dependable and willing to work for mutual benefit.   That ain't Qualcomm.
  • Reply 16 of 34
    M68000 said:
    Yeah,  and who's going to finance this with rising phone service prices and data plans?   The public?
    Yes.   We have financed the entire industry from the beginning, through each "G" -- and will continue to do so.
    JWSC
  • Reply 17 of 34
    Apple is expected to join the 5G revolution in 2020, when the company will purportedly launch an iPhone capable of taking advantage of the next-generation cellular technology, according to a report Friday.

    iPhone XS Max
    iPhone XS and XS Max use Intel modems


    Citing a source familiar with Apple's plans, Fast Company reports Apple intends to use Intel's 5G-capable 8161 modem in an iPhone slated for release in 2020. The handset will be Apple's first product to support the fast 5G standard, which was finalized earlier this year.

    Intel is developing the 8161 with a transition chip called the 8060, silicon that will be used to prototype and test 5G in iPhone, sources said. Of note, the 8161 will be fabricated using Intel's 10-nanometer process, fabrication technology that promises boosts in speed and efficiency.

    Originally expected to be ready for mass manufacturing in 2016, Intel's 10nm process has seen numerous setbacks as the company tackles production snags. Late last month, interim CEO Bob Swan said progress is being made toward volume production, but the long-delayed chip technology is unlikely to be ready until 2019.

    Intel is anticipated to remain Apple's sole baseband chip supplier when 5G does arrive on iPhone, though the tech giant has been "unhappy" with the chipmaker, the report says. Details were left unmentioned, though Fast Company speculates heat dissipation issues with the 8060 modem are to blame for strained relations.

    As explained by the source, carriers transitioning to 5G will initially rely on millimeter-wave spectrum, a technology that places a large amount of stress on cellular modems. The higher-than-normal processing requirements generate excess heat and detracts from handset battery life, issues with which Intel is grappling.

    While the problem Apple reportedly opened discussions with existing supplier MediaTek to furnish modem chips if Intel is unable to solve the problems.

    Just as 4G LTE is the current standard bearer in wireless communications technology, so will 5G see rapid adoption by handset makers in the coming years. Industry stalwart Qualcomm is reportedly pushing up production of its 5G-capable chipsets in anticipation of the first major smartphone releases in 2019.

    Apple is typically slow to adopt the fastest cellular standards in its iPhone line. The first iPhone, for example, launched without support for the then-cutting-edge 3G standard, while 4G LTE integration arrived somewhat late with iPhone 5 in 2012.

    A 5G-capable iPhone launch in 2020 should ramp well with existing infrastructure rollout plans. Carriers are only in the very early stages of seeding their respective networks with compatible base stations, and proliferation toward widespread availability will be slow going. For example, Verizon this month delivered 5G Home, a home broadband service touted as the world's first commercial 5G deployment.
    How fast is 5G??!
    According to Verizon:
    "5G is here, and it’s going to change everything. From the way you communicate to the way you game.

    And it all starts with Verizon 5G Home with speed of about 300 Mbps. It’s the first ever 5G-powered home internet that can connect all your devices. It’s ultra-fast internet that’s ready for what comes next."

    Elsewhere they claim it is "20 times faster".

    p.s.   They are charging $70/month for it ($50 with a Verizon wireless account) -- which isn't a lot different than a cable/FiOS charge which typically delivers far lower speeds.


    edited November 3
  • Reply 18 of 34
    5G Apple Watch, then I may upgrade...

    i think they need a 5G iPhone in 2019, the iPhone would be a better investment then.  I may just skip upgrading next year then.  Would be a first, as usually I upgrade every other year.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 19 of 34
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,401member
    5G Apple Watch, then I may upgrade...

    i think they need a 5G iPhone in 2019, the iPhone would be a better investment then.  I may just skip upgrading next year then.  Would be a first, as usually I upgrade every other year.
    If this year the XS, XSMax and XR follows the 6S sales pattern with lower sales than last year Apple will have to find something to generate sales next year.   I do think that the biggest sellers will be the XSMax and then XR.    I like the colors even if the I have no plans to get one.   I don't want to deal with a substandard model and will stick with my 8Plus and 7Plus with QualComm.    I think the next big thing (for me least ways) would be solid state batteries so that they could both lower the weight and raise the number of hours it lasts on a charge.
  • Reply 20 of 34
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,401member
    I'd rather see Apple settle their lawsuit with Qualcomm and go back to using their modems.  Their cellular modems are far ahead of anyone else.
    A business partner, like a friend, needs more than just a fancy product.   It needs to be reliable, dependable and willing to work for mutual benefit.   That ain't Qualcomm.
    "reliable"  Considering how long intel has taken to move to 10 nm one can't call them reliable.    I'm sure Apple had to delay/redo many product plans.    This is just Qualcomms greed vs.  Apple Greed.     Apple has shown them selves willing to shiv their business partners as fast as Microsoft in the Bill Gates days.
    muthuk_vanalingam
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