Apple offers fix to avoid Swiss scrutiny over Apple Pay's interruption of rival payment ap...

Posted:
in iPhone
Switzerland's competition agency has secured a promise from Apple that it will provide a solution to Apple Pay hijacking control of an iPhone during the use of a locally-made payment app, TWINT.

Apple Pay on iPhone X


"Apple has committed to provide TWINT with the technical capability to suppress the automatic launch of Apple Pay during the payment process with the TWINT app," the agency, WEKO, said according to Reuters. As a result, the agency is calling off a preliminary probe.

TWINT lets users make retail payments by scanning a QR code, but ran into problems with the iPhone because by default, the device launches Apple Pay when it detects an NFC-enabled sales terminal. The app's developer lodged a complaint with WEKO, suggesting anti-competitive practices.

The agency didn't say what fix Apple is offering, but while the option for foreground apps to block Apple Pay has been available since 2015's iOS 9, developers must seek out Apple's permission. TWINT is a focal point in a battle between Apple and Swiss financial institutions, some of which are said to be boycotting Apple Pay (and other mobile payment platforms) to encourage TWINT's use. Apple's system is available in Switzerland, however.

WEKO is separately investigating whether Apple can legally prevent other payment services from tapping into an iPhone's NFC chip. That same issue was the subject of a long-running fight with banks in Australia, which ultimately resulted in them backing down and adopting support. In Switzerland, a complaint was brought by the Consumer Protection Foundation in 2016.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,004member
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 10
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    payecopayeco Posts: 249member
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
    I used Apple Pay all over Europe, including Switzerland. It was super convenient.
    sansslprescottdws-2watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 10
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
    Funny. I spent two weeks in several Eastern European countries last year -- everyone accepted Apple Pay and accepted payment via Apple Watch. I'm talking not only retail stores but pa&ma bars, and storefronts. Eastern European is far ahead of the US in acceptance of Apple Pay and perhaps other NFC payment systems. 

    Maybe your Europe is simply backward. 
    edited December 2018 redraider11mwhiterandominternetpersonsansjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 10
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,975member
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
    If Europe doesn't give a damn about Apple then 1) why are they constantly demanding additional taxes from Apple, and 2) why are you even worried about whether or not Apple wants to restrict the use of the only secure payment process on any mobile device? In my onion Apple has every right to restrict access to NFC payments because as we've seen, everything is Apple's fault and not the fault of the corrupt and ignorant developer wanting an app on the iPhone (QR code scanning and payments are not that secure).
    jbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 10
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,004member
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
    I never said I was the rest of the world, but since it’s apparently ok to judge, neither is Europe. Have you considered that perhaps the rest of the world doesn’t give a damn about Europe?

    I actually have relatives in Europe have been been to there several times and used Apple Pay. Not only was it convenient, many of the (European) people I encountered were impressed by the ease and simplicity of it. 

    For the record, my comment was not referring to Apple Pay, rather the convenience of simply holding your phone up to a NFC terminal and having the wallet app come up without any further action on the user’s part. 
    jbdragonmike1watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 10
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,390member
    MplsP said:
    Funny how a feature the rest of the world thinks is convenient is suddenly an antitrust issue. Maybe they add a slide switch in the wallet settings to turn it off?
    You are no the "rest of the world". You shoud realize you are minority. Europe does not give damn about Apple. Start travelling. I am here but I am from Europe. Your judgement is from small yard and it does not scale to "the rest of the world". Start travelling and open eyes.
    Having lived in Europe for years, and visit constantly... I can safely say that whatever version of Europe you're describing.. it's not the one everyone else lives in.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 10
    Honestly this was more of a bug than anything malicious - any rfid panel would bring up apple pay. E.g. putting a phone down on cardio equipment with rfid tags would cause the same panel to appear.

    This wasn't lost on apple, which is why in iOS11 CoreNFC was added and in iOS 12 apple started to give third party developers access to the RFID unit directly.
    brisanceloopychewwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 10
    Before the tinfoil hat conspiracy theorists chime in, Apple generally has sensible defaults. NFC causes something to launch, in this case the default is Apple Pay/Wallet. If some random app can cause anything to launch, that wouldn't be iOS, it would be Android. Then you'd see that video of a random dude with a handheld POS terminal tapping random strangers' asses, hoping to trigger payments. Then there'd be an outcry over Apple's lack of security consciousness and we'd have another round of "Apple is doomed!" articles.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 10
    So from my experiences using Twint, it's basically Swiss AliPay, in that it's directly connected to your bank account, and you can either directly pay people (like Apple Pay Cash) or scan QR codes (for POS devices and presumably anything with a Twint-based QR code on it?). My thought is along the lines of Brisance: Switzerland, like a lot of Europe, has a POS device that both contains an NFC reader and displays the QR code on the payment screen, within proximity of the NFC field. I'm definitely curious about how they'll address the issue from a technical point of view.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.