Apple hardware SVP Johny Srouji under consideration for Intel CEO spot

Posted:
in General Discussion
Intel's ongoing search for a new chief executive has taken six months so far and has yet to find the right person for the role, but it is now claimed someone from Apple's ranks is being considered for the position, with hardware lead Johny Srouji claimed to be on the list of potential candidates.

Johny Srouji is credited for being on the team developing the A4, Apple's first custom System-on-Chip.
Johny Srouji is credited for being on the team developing the A4, Apple's first custom System-on-Chip.


Intel has been searching for a replacement for previous CEO Brian Krzanich since his resignation in June 2018, but has so far failed to uncover a potential suitor to lead the company. The board of directors have passed on many candidates, but as the pressure to identify a new chief ahead of its earnings on January 24 grows, the list apparently still includes some candidates that have yet to be taken out of the running.

Previously unreported as a candidate for the job, Johny Srouji is alleged by Axios to be still in contention for the role. It is unclear how many candidates are remaining, nor is it known if Srouji is one of the front-runners in the race.

The SVP of hardware technologies at Apple, Srouji joined the executive team in 2015, and has contributed to a number of major technologies that made Apple's devices powerful and groundbreaking products. Srouji's original role at Apple helped spearhead the development of the A4 processor, the company's first custom-designed System on a Chip, as well as the creation of the first Touch ID fingerprint sensor, among other projects.

Srouji has previous experience with Intel, having worked for the chip maker at its Israel facility from 1990 until 2005.

While the fortunes of Srouji are unknown reports have suggested there have been quite a few potential candidates that are no longer being considered for the job. Those out of the running are said to include former Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha and two former Intel executives, identified as Renee James and Anand Chandrasekher.

Intel currently has Chief Financial Officer Bob Swan operating in the role of interim CEO while the search continues, with Swan reportedly not currently a candidate for the position.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,990member
    Very good for Intel, not so good for Apple.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 8
    No wonder Intel has been such a catastrophe of late. They’re completely rudderless.
    schlackchasm
  • Reply 3 of 8
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,057member
    Woah. Apple would be wise to retain him no matter what it takes. Reportedly their salaries aren't particularly high for a company like them, and if that's what's driving top talent to move on, it's a no brainer of an investment. Though some men like Jim Keller just prefer a bigger challenge turning things around, rather than projects that are already going well.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    schlackschlack Posts: 699member
    tipoo said:
    Woah. Apple would be wise to retain him no matter what it takes. Reportedly their salaries aren't particularly high for a company like them, and if that's what's driving top talent to move on, it's a no brainer of an investment. Though some men like Jim Keller just prefer a bigger challenge turning things around, rather than projects that are already going well.
    He was paid $24.2M in 2017. Probably more in 2018. Higher than the vast majority of Fortune 500 CEO pay.
    https://www1.salary.com/Johny-Srouji-Salary-Bonus-Stock-Options-for-APPLE-INC.html

    That's about $3M more than the CEO of Intel made.
    https://www1.salary.com/Brian-M-Krzanich-Salary-Bonus-Stock-Options-for-INTEL-CORP.html
    edited January 15 gutengelpatchythepiratewonkothesanechasm
  • Reply 5 of 8
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,945member
    tipoo said:
    Woah. Apple would be wise to retain him no matter what it takes. Reportedly their salaries aren't particularly high for a company like them, and if that's what's driving top talent to move on, it's a no brainer of an investment. Though some men like Jim Keller just prefer a bigger challenge turning things around, rather than projects that are already going well.
    I doubt pay would be the issue. I would think the more important issue is how interesting/rewarding the work is. 

    At Apple, the constraint he faces is that he can only design SOCs for Apple products. Arguably the A12 does not shine as brightly as it could if it weren't constrained by the limitations of iOS and iDevices (as they currently exist). 

    At Intel, the main constraint is that it's almost all x86, almost all the time. It's also mostly PC/server. 

    Neither of those constraints seems super appealing. I would think that the company that can offer the best chances of moving beyond their current box would be the most appealing employer. I'd like to think that Apple would be that company, but these days I'm not sure. I'd lay 60-40 odds in favor of Apple. 
  • Reply 6 of 8
    blastdoor said:
    tipoo said:
    Woah. Apple would be wise to retain him no matter what it takes. Reportedly their salaries aren't particularly high for a company like them, and if that's what's driving top talent to move on, it's a no brainer of an investment. Though some men like Jim Keller just prefer a bigger challenge turning things around, rather than projects that are already going well.
    I doubt pay would be the issue. I would think the more important issue is how interesting/rewarding the work is. 

    At Apple, the constraint he faces is that he can only design SOCs for Apple products. Arguably the A12 does not shine as brightly as it could if it weren't constrained by the limitations of iOS and iDevices (as they currently exist). 

    At Intel, the main constraint is that it's almost all x86, almost all the time. It's also mostly PC/server. 

    Neither of those constraints seems super appealing. I would think that the company that can offer the best chances of moving beyond their current box would be the most appealing employer. I'd like to think that Apple would be that company, but these days I'm not sure. I'd lay 60-40 odds in favor of Apple. 

    A12 doesn’t shine brightly? It’s by far the most advanced ARM processor out there.

    If the rumors of Apple making their own A Series chip for Macs is true, then I don’t think you could find a bigger challenge in the industry. Taking on Intel with a new architecture? All Intel is doing is iterative updates to the age-old x86 platform.  I don’t think that’s very exciting. 
    applesnorangeschasm
  • Reply 7 of 8
    wood1208 said:
    Very good for Intel, not so good for Apple.
    Not like he will roll into Intel and be able to change things radically. We're talking about Intel.
  • Reply 8 of 8
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,649member
    As much as I think Srouji is a valuable asset that Apple is unlikely to lose, I can't see him as the sort of dynamic, press-savvy leader that Intel really requires at this point. This sounds like a case of the Peter Principle at work to me. He's in exactly the right job for him, IMO.
    1983
Sign In or Register to comment.