Apple to compensate 'Shot on iPhone Challenge' winners for use of photos

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 24
Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week when it announced a "Shot on iPhone Challenge" that select works from ten iPhone photographers to plaster on marketing materials like billboards, all presumably without pay. The company has since updated terms of the contest to note winning artists will indeed be compensated for their work.

Shot on iPhone
A forest scene by Mariko Klug, shot on iPhone


The original "Shot on iPhone Challenge" announcement, posted to Apple's dedicated news website was updated on Thursday to reflect the change. Appended to the fine print anchoring the story, Apple says winners will receive licensing fees when their photos are used for marketing purposes.
Apple believes strongly that artists should be compensated for their work. Photographers who shoot the final 10 winning photos will receive a licensing fee for use of such photos on billboards and other Apple marketing channels.
Apple announced what it referred to as a celebration of " the most stunning photographs captured on iPhone" on Tuesday, and asked photographers to submit samples that will subsequently be judged by a panel of ten experts. The company promised winners nothing but exposure, listing exhibition on the Apple Newsroom webpage, billboards, Apple retail stores and the company's various social media accounts as a "prize."

As noted in the contest's terms and conditions, photographers retain rights to their work, but by submitting it to Apple grant the company "a royalty-free, world-wide, irrevocable, non-exclusive license for one year to use, modify, publish, display, distribute, create derivative works from and reproduce the photo on Apple Newsroom, apple.com, Apple Twitter accounts, Apple Instagram (@Apple), in Apple retail stores, Apple Weibo, Apple WeChat, on billboards and any Apple internal exhibitions."

That mouthful of pseudo-legalese was appended by the caveat above today.

Apple's Shot on iPhone ad campaign, which reproduces photos captured by amateurs using current generation iPhone devices, has become a mainstay for the company since its inception with iPhone 6 in 2015. Along with a warm reception from the public, critics heaped praise on the advertising effort dreamed up by Apple PR and longtime collaborator TBWA\Media Arts Lab. For example, the campaign won multiple awards including a Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions International Festival for Creativity.

The problem for some, however, is the change in format Apple adopted for 2019. Instead of reaching out to photographers privately, the company is hosting a formal contest that -- previously -- asked artists to submit their work without compensation. It appears Apple has become aware of its apparent lapse in judgment.

AppleInsider pointed out the seemingly exploitative nature of Apple's contest in an editorial this week.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week...”

    “Artistic community”. That’s right, the average iPhone user wasn’t whining about this, professional photographers were. But this contest shouldn’t be for/about them. Also this isn’t the first time Apple has run a shot on iPhone campaign. Why all the complaining about not being paid this time?
    yojimbo007LordeHawktmaySuperJoeentropysStrangeDays
  • Reply 2 of 28
    danoxdanox Posts: 379member
    The best picture is one taken at that special moment, and that picture can be taken by anyone, the professionals are mad that anyone can enter and win....
    rogifan_newLordeHawkSpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 28
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,808member
    Wrong decision. How Apple will decide how much to pay. Instead, Apple should honor them with there name. So, no one will complain they got less against others.
  • Reply 4 of 28
    Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week...”

    “Artistic community”. That’s right, the average iPhone user wasn’t whining about this, professional photographers were. But this contest shouldn’t be for/about them. Also this isn’t the first time Apple has run a shot on iPhone campaign. Why all the complaining about not being paid this time?
    I agree! Plus whiners have the tendency to multiply faster than regular folks. ;)
  • Reply 5 of 28
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,429member
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    freethinkingracerhomie3muthuk_vanalingamchasm
  • Reply 6 of 28
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
  • Reply 7 of 28
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 651editor
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    beowulfschmidtmuthuk_vanalingammaciekskontaktchasmurahara
  • Reply 8 of 28
    Do you feel better now, William Gallagher? Quite a nasty and biased article you wrote on the 23rd of January. Or did you just have a terrible day?
    edited January 25
  • Reply 9 of 28
    vmarks said:
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    Like I said maybe I misunderstood the point of this contest/competition. But I’m curious if this had been any company not named Apple and they didn’t offer compensation would there have been this major outcry on social media? My guess is no.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 10 of 28
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,197administrator
    SuperJoe said:
    Given that it was an editorial, by definition, it had opinions much like your post here does. We're not obligated to agree with everything Apple does and says.

    Don't worry. Apple isn't going to take anything away from you because it will pay the photographer it chooses to feature in an advertising campaign.
    edited January 25 muthuk_vanalingamurahara
  • Reply 11 of 28
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,197administrator
    vmarks said:
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    Like I said maybe I misunderstood the point of this contest/competition. But I’m curious if this had been any company not named Apple and they didn’t offer compensation would there have been this major outcry on social media? My guess is no.
    Featuring a photo in a single Tweet is one thing. Using it as a backbone of a multimedia advertising campaign is an entirely different matter. I'm certain that should one of the winners decide that exposure is enough and they don't want to be paid, that Apple will have no problem not paying them.

    it is absolutely the right thing to do.
    edited January 25 beowulfschmidtmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 12 of 28
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,558member
    The purpose of the whining wasn’t to earn money, it was to discredit a competition for people daring to believe, have a notion, a perception, that a camera phone could possibly produce a decent image and compete with professional photographers with professional cameras.

    Those virtue signalling Californian hippies that run Apple didn’t realise they were being beaten at their own game.

    Edit: next time hardly anyone will enter. The perception has been created the competition is for professionals, true or not. something simple has been kilt.innocence lost.
    edited January 25 rogifan_newmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 13 of 28
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,197administrator
    entropys said:
    The purpose of the whining wasn’t to earn money, it was to discredit a competition for people daring to believe, have a notion, a perception, that a camera phone could possibly produce a decent image and compete with professional photographers with professional cameras.

    Those virtue signalling Californian hippies that run Apple didn’t realise they were being beaten at their own game.

    Edit: next time hardly anyone will enter. The perception has been created the competition is for professionals, true or not. something simple has been kilt.innocence lost.
    Five minutes on Google found several Apple contests where customers provided content for an advertising campaign, with prizes given to winners, dating back to 1990. One of them gave away a full Mac IIfx setup in the heyday of the product. In the other thread, a forum-goer spoke about his or her Quicktake that they won for a website. And, I'm pretty sure that there were two in the eighties, but I can't quite pull the details out of this old brain. I remember doling out the contest materials for desktop publishing, but don't remember beyond that.

    I don't think that there will be any rollback in participants, nor is there any innocence lost. YMMV, of course.
    edited January 25 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 28
    Free material for commercial advertisment for Apple. Not only charge a lot for devices, but have material for free. Right.
  • Reply 15 of 28
    vmarks said:
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    That’s an interesting opinion, but thus far in history beauty, art, and culture haven’t been lost, despite the arts being low-to-no paying. People do it anyway. Always have, always will. As an amateur photographer my work has never been for pay, and I’d do it regardless. That will always be the case and from that pool talent will always rise up and the arts/culture will always exist. 
  • Reply 16 of 28
    vmarks said:
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    Also all work for commercial use is supposed to be paid. This is why some open source software ihas free license... until it os used commercialy and then it is commercially licensed which mean people must be paid the price of product or there will be lawsuit for commercial loss.
  • Reply 17 of 28
    Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week...”

    “Artistic community”. That’s right, the average iPhone user wasn’t whining about this, professional photographers were. But this contest shouldn’t be for/about them. Also this isn’t the first time Apple has run a shot on iPhone campaign. Why all the complaining about not being paid this time?
    I agree! Plus whiners have the tendency to multiply faster than regular folks. ;)
    It does not matter if professional or not - the work used commercially should be paid regardless if this was done by a kid, amateur or professional. Nothing is for free... onless author donates product it.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 18 of 28
    bellsbells Posts: 119member
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.

    That is crap. People do things for reasons other than compensation all the time. Maybe the photographer wants exposure he or she wouldn’t otherwise get. Maybe it is fun to have your work judged by professionals. Most importantly Apple was clear there was no prize other than to be acknowledged and people aren’t  forced to provide pictures. Don’t get me wrong if Apple wanted to offer a monetary prize that is great,  but there was no controversy here other than a manufactured one. Exposure by Apple has to be valuable to an amateur if you are looking to have your photo acknowledged. If it wasn’t, don’t provide your photos.

    Companies like Pinterest and Facebook make tons of money off users uploading various media and they aren’t being compensated. No difference, and nobody is complaining. 

  • Reply 19 of 28
    bellsbells Posts: 119member

    “Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week...”

    “Artistic community”. That’s right, the average iPhone user wasn’t whining about this, professional photographers were. But this contest shouldn’t be for/about them. Also this isn’t the first time Apple has run a shot on iPhone campaign. Why all the complaining about not being paid this time?
    I agree! Plus whiners have the tendency to multiply faster than regular folks. ;)
    It does not matter if professional or not - the work used commercially should be paid regardless if this was done by a kid, amateur or professional. Nothing is for free... onless author donates product it.
    “Apple caused a bit of a stir in the artistic community this week...”

    “Artistic community”. That’s right, the average iPhone user wasn’t whining about this, professional photographers were. But this contest shouldn’t be for/about them. Also this isn’t the first time Apple has run a shot on iPhone campaign. Why all the complaining about not being paid this time?
    I agree! Plus whiners have the tendency to multiply faster than regular folks. ;)
    It does not matter if professional or not - the work used commercially should be paid regardless if this was done by a kid, amateur or professional. Nothing is for free... onless author donates product it.
    Last I checked in America you are free to have a no cash award contest and people are free to participate or not. Perhaps forcing a cash prize will mean fewer opportunities for valuable exposure in the future.
  • Reply 20 of 28
    vmarks said:
    sflocal said:
    Typical ignorance displayed in this thread.  I'm glad Apple saw the error of its ways.  Why do you feel it okay for a multi-billion-dollar company like Apple to compensate everyone else involved in the campaign - from the judges, print-labs, post-processors, billboard owners, etc but not the person that took the actual photograph?  Is their time and effort for taking that one perfect shot not worth anything?

    The iPhone is probably the most popular "camera" in use today for social-media.  That gives people like you the impression that this competition is all about posting some random selfies, or quick-pics, and while I'm sure there will be many doing that, anyone serious in wanting to get into that top ten will put effort, and even money - in terms of gas, travel, lodging maybe?? - to turn what's in their mind a reality.  Most people nowadays think taking a photo is just a matter of pressing the shutter button.  Fine, but taking an actual "photograph" that speaks to you and makes it an emotional statement takes effort and an artistic touch.

    The "average iPhone user wasn't whining" just means they don't care - literally.  They think it will just be like winning the lottery - a fluke.  Even then, they should be paid something.  You want to do things for free, go right ahead.  Doesn't mean it's right.
    Did Apple say the people judging the photos were being paid?  Anyway now that people are being paid it changes the competition IMO. If Apple wanted to commission an ad campaign with professional photographers they could easily do so. I thought this campaign was all about amateurs and the idea that you didn’t have to put in a lot of effort (or know a lot about photograph) to get a great photo from the smartphone in your pocket. But maybe I was wrong and Apple is expecting people will put in a lot of time and effort to get a great shot and in that case then yeah pay them. But people will still complain that the license fee isn’t enough.
    If you're profiting off the work of someone, that person deserves to be paid. Just because someone is an amateur doesn't change that their work has value. If it has value (and it does, if it's good enough that you're using it on billboards), then it should be paid for. It's still amateur photography. It still shows that you can get a great photo from an iPhone. The subtext you presumed, that it doesn't take a lot of effort, or require knowing a lot about photography was never a part of the contest, or a part of previous "shot on iPhone" campaigns. They like for you to presume that, but pro photogs participated, and that was fine, too.

    The reason professionals are up in arms is, when you devalue the work of an amateur, you devalue the work of the professional. How many times are professionals asked to do something for exposure? All the time. How fast will their rates drop when you can just get an amateur to do it for free? Blindingly fast. Which means, less people able to make work professionally, which has bad results for the amount of people able to produce the things we enjoy in the world. You think I'm kidding, but there is an impact: if you don't pay people, people go into other fields. On a longer timeline, this is how you lose beauty, art, and eventually culture. There are no patrons: either people get paid, or it goes away.
    Sorry, that statement doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. It’s a two way street. There is no “deserve” that comes into play. If one were to apply the same logic that because this site is a for-profit business, all of the people who spend countless hours contributing value in the form of informative posts, tips, discussions and items of interest “deserve” to be compensated at market rates for works of authorship. 

    People post here voluntatily and the compensation is the continuation of a forum that is valuable. In the same fashion, Apple could’ve merely given a credit in exchange for a free non-exclusive worldwide license to the image.
    edited January 25
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