Apple spent $60 billion with 9,000 American manufacturers in 2018 alone

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 28
Apple is heralding its commitment to American companies, and has detailed its involvement with manufacturers, plus its role in expanding businesses that supply components for the iPhone and Mac.

Finisar's manufacturing plant in Texas
Finisar's manufacturing plant in Texas


Apple noted on Monday that its $390 million investment from Apple's Advanced Manufacturing Fund allowed component manufacturer Finisar to turn an unoccupied building in Sherman, Texas into "a bustling operation full of people who will supply that future business." Finisar makes the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser, or VCSEL, part of the TrueDepth camera system, crucial for Face ID in the iPhone X and later.

"VCSEL wafers are nearly as thin as a human hair and contain hundreds of layers measuring only a few atoms in thickness," said Apple. "They require a highly advanced and precise manufacturing operation, as well as skilled technicians with specialized training."

Since 2011, the total number of jobs created and supported by Apple in the United States has more than tripled -- from almost 600,000 to 2 million across all 50 states. Beyond Apple's noting the $60 billion spent in the year from the Advanced Manufacturing Fund, Apple's 2018 expansion supports more than 450,000 jobs on its own.

Apple notes that the touch sensitive glass for iPhone and iPad is made by Corning at a 65-year-old facility in Harrodsburg, Kentucky. Cincinnati Test Systems in Ohio designed a first-of-its-kind equipment to ensure iPhone is water resistant.

Other electronics manufacturers cited by Apple include Broadcom in Fort Collins, Colorado, Qorvo in Hillsboro, Oregon and Skyworks in Woburn, Massachusetts. All three make wireless networking and communications components for Apple.

The Advanced Manufacturing Fund is geared toward supporting U.S. manufacturing. Apple's first investment took place in May 2017, when it spent $200 million on Corning -- the company that makes the Gorilla Glass used in many Apple devices.

"We're really proud to do it," Apple CEO Tim Cook said when the fund was announced. "By doing that we can be the ripple in the pond, because if we can create many manufacturing jobs, those manufacturing jobs create more jobs around them."

The Advanced Manufacturing Fund goes beyond Apple's $1 billion investment in SoftBank's Vision Fund, a $100 billion resource created to accelerate the development of technology around the world. Some $50 billion of the Vision Fund will be directed toward U.S. endeavors.
patchythepirate

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    edited January 28 SpamSandwichmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 19
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    It's from Apple's press release issued today.

    I'd also note that, even with many of its 132,000 employees (as of the end of its FY2018) being retail employees, Apple's median employee total compensation was over $55,000 in FY2018. That's median, not mean, so the number isn't inflated by very-highly compensated employees at the top.
    anantksundarampatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 19
    LatkoLatko Posts: 398member
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    I do neither (but what difference does it make ?) The point here is that Apple PR wants to impress the public with numbers, big numbers, like all multi-billion moloch multi-nationals do. And that only works for a certain amount of time. At some point, people will say “Duh. What’s in it for me ?” And after that moment, it will only contribute to the “too big, slow, incumbent, too expensive for what it brings” etc. etc. image. How people identify Apple, is determined by people. Not by Tim’s norms an priorities. Because, sadly, he’s not Steve. And his decisions are always overrated by himelf. Spending billions on Corning, on Samsung OLED, on Sapphire initiatives - it all leads to the notion that they lack screen making capabilities and therefore have to do over-expensive purchasing at the competition that they declared thermonuclear war on. The public aren’t fools.
    edited January 28
  • Reply 4 of 19
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,647administrator
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    Third paragraph below the image. Been there since the first draft.
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 19
    tbornottbornot Posts: 107member
    Note that in China, Apple is not dinged for paying their workers below minimum wage, they are dinged for SLAVERY.  I know the difference might appear subtle, but it’s tremendous in its evilness.
  • Reply 6 of 19
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    Third paragraph below the image. Been there since the first draft.
    OK. That's a bit weird, since I even re-read. And did a text search for "60" on the page, and it pulled up only two references: the headline number, and the 60 in "600,000".
  • Reply 7 of 19
    carnegie said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    It's from Apple's press release issued today.

    I'd also note that, even with many of its 132,000 employees (as of the end of its FY2018) being retail employees, Apple's median employee total compensation was over $55,000 in FY2018. That's median, not mean, so the number isn't inflated by very-highly compensated employees at the top.
    Thanks for the cite.

    The $55K number is less impressive than it sounds. The median pay at Facebook is $240K; Google $197K; Netflix $183K. In fact, Apple's median pay is similar to that of GM's.
    edited January 28 gatorguy
  • Reply 8 of 19
    ClarityToSeeClarityToSee Posts: 34unconfirmed, member
    It doesn’t matter if Apple spends another $60 Billion in 2019 on top of $60 Billion dollars already spent in 2018 on American Manufacturers. Because they are not doing out of altruism but rather out of necessity. They wouldn’t have an iPhone if American Manufacturers don’t sell to Apple much like ZTE found out the hard way. 
    Secondly, the reason Americans don’t see this $60Billion dollars impact their economy in a positive manner is because even Apple’s suppliers and manufacturers don’t manufacture at home. They outsource to Asia and Mexico. Hence what Trump said was absolutely true “Apple benefits China more than it benefits US” regardless of how many numbers are being thrown around.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 19
    carnegie said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    It's from Apple's press release issued today.

    I'd also note that, even with many of its 132,000 employees (as of the end of its FY2018) being retail employees, Apple's median employee total compensation was over $55,000 in FY2018. That's median, not mean, so the number isn't inflated by very-highly compensated employees at the top.
    Thanks for the cite.

    The $55K number is less impressive than it sounds. The median pay at Facebook is $240K; Google $197K; Netflix $183K. In fact, Apple's median pay is similar to that of GM's.
    You're welcome.

    To the degree it might be impressive, it would be because Apple has so many retail employees.
    edited January 28 cornchippatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 19
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    Third paragraph below the image. Been there since the first draft.
    OK. That's a bit weird, since I even re-read. And did a text search for "60" on the page, and it pulled up only two references: the headline number, and the 60 in "600,000".
    It's another case of important, top-level info being stuffed "below the fold", rather than in the lede. This is a bit odd. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 19
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,705member
    Latko said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    I do neither (but what difference does it make ?) The point here is that Apple PR wants to impress the public with numbers, big numbers, like all multi-billion moloch multi-nationals do. And that only works for a certain amount of time. At some point, people will say “Duh. What’s in it for me ?” And after that moment, it will only contribute to the “too big, slow, incumbent, too expensive for what it brings” etc. etc. image. How people identify Apple, is determined by people. Not by Tim’s norms an priorities. Because, sadly, he’s not Steve. And his decisions are always overrated by himelf. Spending billions on Corning, on Samsung OLED, on Sapphire initiatives - it all leads to the notion that they lack screen making capabilities and therefore have to do over-expensive purchasing at the competition that they declared thermonuclear war on. The public aren’t fools.
    Nonsense. Who thought Apple made every component in its products? No one did. Apple gets great deals on components due to the quantity it needs. 
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 19
    I watched Ashton Kuschner”s version of the Steve Jobs movie last night. The corporate culture is killing Apple yet again. In 1984/5 the Mackingtosh was sold at $2500 (~6000 in today”s money).
    When blame was assigned for the low sales volumes of the Mac, Jobs blamed the overpricing of what was supposed to be a $1000 machine for the mass market.

    FF to 2018 with iPXs and XR, and the moneyspinner iP is suffering exactly the same. Only this time round, there is no sexy comeback.

    Trump’s policy and my shared view is exactly the same. You sell locally at inflated prices and employ but empowered burger flippers. The cheaper manufacturing only expunge greater profits, not lower prices.

    And on and on ....

    I bought 15+ devices amongst my family in the last 3 years. I don”t own the stock. But Apple has run it’s course in my wallet, because my cc sings every few days with no value added subscriptions.

    Android is on the next list, simp,y because Apple”s business practises has become too obvious.
    ClarityToSee
  • Reply 13 of 19
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,599member
    carnegie said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    It's from Apple's press release issued today.

    I'd also note that, even with many of its 132,000 employees (as of the end of its FY2018) being retail employees, Apple's median employee total compensation was over $55,000 in FY2018. That's median, not mean, so the number isn't inflated by very-highly compensated employees at the top.
    Thanks for the cite.

    The $55K number is less impressive than it sounds. The median pay at Facebook is $240K; Google $197K; Netflix $183K. In fact, Apple's median pay is similar to that of GM's.
    Boy you missed his point, this means Apple employs people up and down the income spectrum as such they actually represent what America looks like verse the one's you sited which is a bunch of people who can not relate to people who use their products. If you work with a bunch of people who make $200K per year i highly double you can understand the other 70% of the people who live in this country.  Making $200K a year means you can pretty much doe what you like and do not have to worry about money.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 14 of 19
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,647administrator
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    Third paragraph below the image. Been there since the first draft.
    OK. That's a bit weird, since I even re-read. And did a text search for "60" on the page, and it pulled up only two references: the headline number, and the 60 in "600,000".
    It's another case of important, top-level info being stuffed "below the fold", rather than in the lede. This is a bit odd. 
    It's in the headline. It doesn't need to be in the headline and the lede. And, it's not like it was 10 paragraphs down.
    edited January 28 patchythepirate
  • Reply 15 of 19
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,599member
    jungmark said:
    Latko said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    I do neither (but what difference does it make ?) The point here is that Apple PR wants to impress the public with numbers, big numbers, like all multi-billion moloch multi-nationals do. And that only works for a certain amount of time. At some point, people will say “Duh. What’s in it for me ?” And after that moment, it will only contribute to the “too big, slow, incumbent, too expensive for what it brings” etc. etc. image. How people identify Apple, is determined by people. Not by Tim’s norms an priorities. Because, sadly, he’s not Steve. And his decisions are always overrated by himelf. Spending billions on Corning, on Samsung OLED, on Sapphire initiatives - it all leads to the notion that they lack screen making capabilities and therefore have to do over-expensive purchasing at the competition that they declared thermonuclear war on. The public aren’t fools.
    Nonsense. Who thought Apple made every component in its products? No one did. Apple gets great deals on components due to the quantity it needs. 

    At first I had no idea what his point was, but I think you hit on it. Some how he thinks only companies which are totally vertically integrated are successful like may TCL TV. If you never worked in high Tech, no US company is vertically integrated, the last big ones were Ford, GE and IBM, and the reason they are not, because you can not pivot and turn when technology changes if you have all technologies under one roof. 

    The other things most people fail to understand about Apple and many technologies companies, Just because Apple does not control the manufacturing of a technology does not mean they do not control the design and IP of the product. People think Apple calls up Samsung and said send over your next great display, when in reality Apple is providing design spec to companies like Samsung and tells them how to build the display they want. It like the VCSEL wafers made by Finisar, Apple and Finisar work on this together to develop the technology for Apple, this is why no one has knocked off the faceID at this point. Its in the tech that Apple controls.
    radarthekatpatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 19
    tbornot said:
    Note that in China, Apple is not dinged for paying their workers below minimum wage, they are dinged for SLAVERY.  I know the difference might appear subtle, but it’s tremendous in its evilness.
    Chinese workers are constantly jumping ship from one company to another for better pay, even if it means they work in conditions that Western workers would never tolerate. I’ve been there and saw this for myself. There is no slavery. That’s uninformed nonsense.
    anantksundarampatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 19
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,095moderator
    tbornot said:
    Note that in China, Apple is not dinged for paying their workers below minimum wage, they are dinged for SLAVERY.  I know the difference might appear subtle, but it’s tremendous in its evilness.
    You’re talking about Apple retail employees in China? Please cite your source that shows Apple pays them below minimum wage?  As far as I know, Apple has no other employees in China, except a relative few in executive positions who coordinate with the companies that manufacture components for Apple and coordinate with Apple’s product manufacturing partners.  
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 19
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,339member
    carnegie said:
    I am sorry, but I am not seeing the "$60 billion" number quoted anywhere in the text of the article? Who said it, where, when? Cite?

    Also, while I am not belittling the massive addition of jobs in the US, it is important to note that most of Apple's job creation here is in retail, which are low-skill, low-paying jobs.
    It's from Apple's press release issued today.

    I'd also note that, even with many of its 132,000 employees (as of the end of its FY2018) being retail employees, Apple's median employee total compensation was over $55,000 in FY2018. That's median, not mean, so the number isn't inflated by very-highly compensated employees at the top.
    Thanks for the cite.

    The $55K number is less impressive than it sounds. The median pay at Facebook is $240K; Google $197K; Netflix $183K. In fact, Apple's median pay is similar to that of GM's.

    Fwiw, I’d love to make 55k yr, & I’m a 2-college-degreed, skilled employee with a decade of experience. Would be well over 10K what I’m making now.
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 19
    tbornot said:
    Note that in China, Apple is not dinged for paying their workers below minimum wage, they are dinged for SLAVERY.  I know the difference might appear subtle, but it’s tremendous in its evilness.
    Are your favorite companies dinged? I’m assuming Samsung and other Android makers are your preferred tech. Well they all build in China. Apple actually raised the standards and the pay there. It amounts to willingness. They can compete with other companies because the cost start of the same but by providing volume for just a few items the economy of scale kicks in to provide an advantage. I doubt seriously you would be willing to pay for an Apple quality phone built solely in the US. The cost of the Mac Pro should give you a hint of the price. 
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
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