Italy forces iPhone battery throttling notice posting on Apple's Italian homepage

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 11
Apple's homepage in Italy has been required to display a report about iOS updates affecting performance if a battery is chemically depleted or not functioning properly, following a lawsuit and a fine levied against both Apple and Samsung for reportedly misleading users.




The Autorite Garante della Concorrenza e del Mercato (AGCM), Italy's official authority on marketing and advertising issues, previously ruled that Apple and Samsung are both guilty of pressing users to update software without acknowledging that this affects the performance of older phones. It has now required Apple's Italian site to display a notice to this effect on its homepage.

The AGCM's mandated notice on Apple Italy's homepage
The AGCM's mandated notice on Apple Italy's homepage


The notice is at the very bottom of Apple's front page and comes with no additional comment from Apple. It's described as "dichiarazione rettificativa", an amending declaration, and states that Apple led iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, and iPhone 6s Plus phones to update to iOS 10.2.1 and later with no information about the performance impact. It also says that Apple gave no means for users to restore the original performance at the time, although it has since.

The AGCM originally fined Apple the equivalent of $11.4 million and Samsung $5.7 million in October 2018.

The news of this homepage requirement was first reported by setteBIT on Twitter.

Apple costretta a pubblicare in fondo al sito italiano la sentenza negativa dell'antitrust https://t.co/BPEqLuonMA sull'"obsolescenza programmata" degli iPhone 6/6s con iOS 10 (che costata ben 10 mln di multa). Lo stesso dovrebbe fare Samsung Italia pic.twitter.com/3BHPVCYd60

-- setteBIT (@setteBIT)


It's not known yet how long Apple is required to display this notice. Reportedly, Samsung has been ordered to display a similar notice, but at time of writing there is no equivalent on Samsung's Italian homepage.

Apple has previously apologized for making the decision to throttle iPhones with worn batteries, with the intention of preventing performance issues. Introduced with the iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE in 2016, Apple cited lithium-ion batteries becoming "less capable of supplying peak current demands" in cold conditions and having "a low battery charge" as they age, which can cause iPhones to unexpectedly shut down.

In response to consumer complaints, Apple reduced the cost of the out-of-warranty battery replacements from $79 to $29, then later issued an iOS software update with Battery Health options. The $29 battery replacement program has since expired.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,782member
    Meanwhile in the Apple Discussion Forums there’s huge thread of users going apeshit over their battery health monitors showing 99% a week after they bought their device. Dozens of first time posters accusing Apple of all manner of evilness, lots of “fix” suggestions and assumptions that their battery will continue to decline at accelerated rates. Hand wringing, fretting, stress, anger. So there is such a thing as too much information, especially in the vacuum of ignorance. Even with all the reporting about the lifespan and slow degradation of Lithium Ion batteries people still think their batteries should last forever. In my opinion this is the biggest argument for easy user replaceable batteries. Let people change their batteries out every week if they want to, just more revenue off the stupid ones.
    edited February 11 camcmuthuk_vanalingamandrewj5790StrangeDayswonkothesanemacxpresswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 6
    camccamc Posts: 19member
    Ridiculous. But I somewhat like the crisp contrast between the ugly piece of paper coming from the court and the beauty of Apple's website. 
    One has simply to take a look and to choose his/her side. Kudos to the executive who decided to post that order in the original form.
    As an Italian iPhone owner, and longtime Apple user, I find today another reason to be ashamed for our government's behaviour. 
    andrewj5790racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 6
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,007member
    Ridiculous. Let’s start putting disclaimers on cars about mileage, and everything else that doesn’t work on every product exactly like they’re advertised. We get too many disclaimers on everything already. Everyone needs to get a life and quit complaining all the time. Nothing is perfect. 
    andrewj5790racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 6
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    I guess in Italy smartphones that just up and die with a dead battery without trying to salvage the last few millivolts are preferred.
    racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 6
    lkrupp said:
    So there is such a thing as too much information, especially in the vacuum of ignorance.
    Sentence of the day. 
    racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 6
    rob53 said:
    Ridiculous. Let’s start putting disclaimers on cars about mileage, and everything else that doesn’t work on every product exactly like they’re advertised. We get too many disclaimers on everything already. Everyone needs to get a life and quit complaining all the time. Nothing is perfect. 
    I’m dealing with product liability. And it’s really sad to see how certain countries assume a consumer to be “reasonable”. Why this is sad? Because there are other countries that don’t assume a person to be “reasonable” in order to be entitled to something or other. Jesus, just as in other recent cases, such as the loose/loose situation in  “oh my god, I have to enter a six digit number every once in a while” versus “I will sue because my account was not protected well enough with ‘abcd’ as Password” it would appear that sadly common sense is outdated and quickly being replaced by lobotomy as the new intellectual standard. 
    watto_cobra
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