Sleep tracking and monitoring coming to Apple Watch in 2020

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited February 26
Apple is reportedly testing sleep monitoring in an employee focus group, and appears poised to add the feature to the Apple Watch in 2020.




Predicted by Bloomberg, the feature is said to be in testing by Apple employees currently. However, as the report expects that it will arrive in the 2020 lineup of products, it is not ready for public use.

The rumored feature addition isn't a big surprise. Apple acquired sleep monitoring company Beddit in 2017, and revised the product in 2018. It is also a logical extension of the company's continued push into health monitoring.

Bloomberg notes that addition of sleep tracking would require more battery life, as most users presently charge the device at night. Alternatively, a low-powered implementation, and Apple shifting to some kind of faster Qi-related charging than it currently uses could only mandate a quick charge in the morning.

Such monitoring could be implemented as an extension of the existing Bedtime feature that was introduced in iOS 10. This is a very basic alarm that tells you what time to go to bed if you say how long you want to sleep and when you need to get up. However, it also integrates with the Health app to show at least some details of your sleep history.

There are also third-party sleep trackers for the Apple Watch, though, including AutoSleep by Tantsissa which can use the Watch's motion sensors to judge how long you're asleep.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,149member
    I look forward to Apple getting into this area and hopefully using sensors that go beyond motion. I've been testing AutoSleep as has my wife and the results seem somewhat dubious to us, to put it mildly.  My wife is a poor sleeper often lying awake for hours which all get's logged as sleep.  How it can recognize 'deep sleep' from 'quality sleep' based on movement as opposed to electrical read-outs from the brain is a mystery to me.  For the price, I am not complaining but I suspect they are just novelty apps until more sensor data can be accessed.
    GeorgeBMacbonobobAppleExposedrepressthis80s_Apple_Guylolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 29
    ...
    Bloomberg notes that addition of sleep tracking would require more battery life, as most users presently charge the device at night. Alternatively, a low-powered implementation, and Apple shifting to some kind of faster Qi-related charging than it currently uses could only mandate a quick charge in the morning...
    or perhaps the Apple Watch is left charging on the nightstand while the beddit product sends it updates via BTLE.
    longpathlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 29
    I’m curious to know why sleep tracking would require new hardware....other than it’s a way for Apple to get people to upgrade.
    gutengel
  • Reply 4 of 29
    I’m curious to know why sleep tracking would require new hardware....other than it’s a way for Apple to get people to upgrade.
    They might say something along the lines of better battery life, ultra energy saving mode or fast charging. I've using my S4 to track my sleep with AutoSleep and I just charge my AW every other day.
    longpathrepressthisMisterKitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 29
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,149member
    gutengel said:
    I’m curious to know why sleep tracking would require new hardware....other than it’s a way for Apple to get people to upgrade.
    They might say something along the lines of better battery life, ultra energy saving mode or fast charging. I've using my S4 to track my sleep with AutoSleep and I just charge my AW every other day.
    Mine lasts 23 hours and 40 minutes on average so I keep it on a night (the night light is very useful at times) and charge it fully each morning while I shower and have breakfast, it charges that fast.
    edited February 26 AppleExposedrepressthischarlesgresMisterKitiqatedoStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 29
    flydogflydog Posts: 234member
    I’m curious to know why sleep tracking would require new hardware....other than it’s a way for Apple to get people to upgrade.
    This is explained in the article,
    Bloomberg notes that addition of sleep tracking would require more battery life, as most users presently charge the device at night. Alternatively, a low-powered implementation, and Apple shifting to some kind of faster Qi-related charging than it currently uses could only mandate a quick charge in the morning.
    longpathAppleExposedrepressthis
  • Reply 7 of 29
    flydogflydog Posts: 234member

    MacPro said:
    I look forward to Apple getting into this area and hopefully using sensors that go beyond motion. I've been testing AutoSleep as has my wife and the results seem somewhat dubious to us, to put it mildly.  My wife is a poor sleeper often lying awake for hours which all get's logged as sleep.  How it can recognize 'deep sleep' from 'quality sleep' based on movement as opposed to electrical read-outs from the brain is a mystery to me.  For the price, I am not complaining but I suspect they are just novelty apps until more sensor data can be accessed.
    Apple has disabled the light sleep vs deep sleep functionality.
  • Reply 8 of 29
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,690member
    MacPro said:
    I look forward to Apple getting into this area and hopefully using sensors that go beyond motion. I've been testing AutoSleep as has my wife and the results seem somewhat dubious to us, to put it mildly.  My wife is a poor sleeper often lying awake for hours which all get's logged as sleep.  How it can recognize 'deep sleep' from 'quality sleep' based on movement as opposed to electrical read-outs from the brain is a mystery to me.  For the price, I am not complaining but I suspect they are just novelty apps until more sensor data can be accessed.
    You should try a different app. SleepWatch does use motion but it also uses your HR to determine your sleep cycles. You never tell it when you're sleeping and I've found it to be surprisingly accurate when knowing I'm both in bed and taking a nap. It even worked on a plane, which I found surprising since that's a lot of constant bumping and poor overall sleep.

    edited February 26 repressthisiqatedowatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 29
    Very much looking forward to an Apple implementation of sleep tracking. I use other ones but I'm sure Apple will do it right. 
    AppleExposedlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 29
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    I look forward to Apple getting into this area and hopefully using sensors that go beyond motion. I've been testing AutoSleep as has my wife and the results seem somewhat dubious to us, to put it mildly.  My wife is a poor sleeper often lying awake for hours which all get's logged as sleep.  How it can recognize 'deep sleep' from 'quality sleep' based on movement as opposed to electrical read-outs from the brain is a mystery to me.  For the price, I am not complaining but I suspect they are just novelty apps until more sensor data can be accessed.
    You should try a different app. SleepWatch does use motion but it also uses your HR to determine your sleep cycles. You never tell it when you're sleeping and I've found it to be surprisingly accurate when knowing I'm both in bed and taking a nap. It even worked on a plane, which I found surprising since that's a lot of constant movement with plane and poor overall sleep.

    AutoSleep has helped me improve my sleep hygiene //immensely//. Correcting an ambiguity above, AutoSleep definitely and emphatically uses heart rate monitoring along with physical motion monitoring.
    SolidewmeStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 29
    I've been using Sleep Cycle for months; it uses combination of Watch and phone's mic to provide astonishingly accurate view of slumber. The alarm rocks as well, and senses when you're starting to wake, increasing the volume of the sound. I don't have battery issue with Series 4, provided I remember to use theater mode before going to sleep, and especially, don't fall asleep with the flashlight function on ...
    iqatedowatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 29
    I use AutoSleep (which requires wearing the watch all night) and haven't had any problem keeping the watch charged. I've gotten into a routine of putting the Apple Watch on the nightstand charger when I get home from work and it's fully charged well before I retire for the night and put the watch back on. When I get up in the morning, I stick it on the bathroom charger (I have a second charger in the bathroom) while I'm showering and shaving and getting dressed. It's fully topped off again and ready for a day of use. 

    The one thing I will mention, if you're a light sleeper, is make yourself a custom face which is dark and shows nothing but the digital time in a large font size. That'll reduce your overnight battery draw. My nighttime face is black with red digital time to preserve night vision and no complications running. The AutoSleep app runs in the background and draws very little battery current. It literally takes about three seconds to change nighttime face back to one of the daytime faces I've set up. 

    Apple shouldn't have any problem tracking sleep patterns without excessive battery draw despite having to wear the device all night. I think they spec out the full charge time at 2 1/2 hours. I never go to 0% so it doesn't even take that long to charge. 
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 29
    I also use AutoSleep (works great) and battery life is a non-issue. At night, I set the watch to "Theatre Mode" so the watch face doesn't go on as I move around while sleeping or trying to get to sleep. That likely saves some battery. In the morning, I pop it on the charger (left by side of bed) and by the time I'm ready to leave for the morning it is fully charged. This worked on my older series 3 AW as well. It's easier to simply make that part of my morning routine so even if the battery lasted some number of days, I'd probably charge it daily.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 14 of 29
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 626unconfirmed, member
    When Apple can improve the battery vastly, we will see this addition. 
  • Reply 15 of 29
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,216member
    I can routinely get 2 days out of my series 3 watch and it charges reasonably quickly with the current inductive charger. I can easily see putting it on the charger for 30 min while you shower and get dressed in the morning and getting enough charge for the day. I don’t use mine to make a lot of phone calls, stream music, etc, however.

    Something that would be nice is if the watch could monitor for hypoxia. They already have LEDs in the back to sense heart rate. Adding pulse oximetry would be a nice way to screen for sleep apnea. Beyond that, I already know I dont’ get enough sleep - I dont’ need my watch to tell me!
    berndog
  • Reply 16 of 29
    When Apple can improve the battery vastly, we will see this addition. 
    Did you read the comments before writing? Third party apps are already available and being widely used without significantly impacting battery life. Apple will do even better. 
    80s_Apple_GuyStrangeDayswatto_cobraurahara
  • Reply 17 of 29
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,149member
    pk22901 said:
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    I look forward to Apple getting into this area and hopefully using sensors that go beyond motion. I've been testing AutoSleep as has my wife and the results seem somewhat dubious to us, to put it mildly.  My wife is a poor sleeper often lying awake for hours which all get's logged as sleep.  How it can recognize 'deep sleep' from 'quality sleep' based on movement as opposed to electrical read-outs from the brain is a mystery to me.  For the price, I am not complaining but I suspect they are just novelty apps until more sensor data can be accessed.
    You should try a different app. SleepWatch does use motion but it also uses your HR to determine your sleep cycles. You never tell it when you're sleeping and I've found it to be surprisingly accurate when knowing I'm both in bed and taking a nap. It even worked on a plane, which I found surprising since that's a lot of constant movement with plane and poor overall sleep.

    AutoSleep has helped me improve my sleep hygiene //immensely//. Correcting an ambiguity above, AutoSleep definitely and emphatically uses heart rate monitoring along with physical motion monitoring.
    Good to know yet AutoSleep is still wildly inaccurate in our tests.  So I stand by my first comment i.e. hoping Apple is delving into more areas than motion and HR somehow.
    edited February 26 80s_Apple_Guy
  • Reply 18 of 29
    felix01 said:
    I use AutoSleep (which requires wearing the watch all night) and haven't had any problem keeping the watch charged. I've gotten into a routine of putting the Apple Watch on the nightstand charger when I get home from work and it's fully charged well before I retire for the night and put the watch back on. When I get up in the morning, I stick it on the bathroom charger (I have a second charger in the bathroom) while I'm showering and shaving and getting dressed. It's fully topped off again and ready for a day of use. 

    The one thing I will mention, if you're a light sleeper, is make yourself a custom face which is dark and shows nothing but the digital time in a large font size. That'll reduce your overnight battery draw. My nighttime face is black with red digital time to preserve night vision and no complications running. The AutoSleep app runs in the background and draws very little battery current. It literally takes about three seconds to change nighttime face back to one of the daytime faces I've set up. 

    Apple shouldn't have any problem tracking sleep patterns without excessive battery draw despite having to wear the device all night. I think they spec out the full charge time at 2 1/2 hours. I never go to 0% so it doesn't even take that long to charge. 
    The watch face does not matter if you put your Apple Watch in theater mode. 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 19 of 29
    Not sure if I'm in the minority, but I hate sleeping with a watch on.

    I'd love it if Apple introduced an unobtrusive sensor that can be put on the wrist, ankle, or both. They already have a patent on something like this that they've even developed to include motion monitoring for sports training and tracking. Not sure what's taking them so long to implement a functional application of this idea.
    edited February 26 dewme
  • Reply 20 of 29
    flydog said:
    I’m curious to know why sleep tracking would require new hardware....other than it’s a way for Apple to get people to upgrade.
    This is explained in the article,
    Bloomberg notes that addition of sleep tracking would require more battery life, as most users presently charge the device at night. Alternatively, a low-powered implementation, and Apple shifting to some kind of faster Qi-related charging than it currently uses could only mandate a quick charge in the morning.
    What does that have to do with sleep tracking? People use current Watches for sleep tracking now. 
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