'Privacy. That's iPhone' ad campaign launches, highlights Apple's stance on user protectio...

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 14
The new Apple "Privacy. That's iPhone" ad campaign has debuted, reiterating the company's stance on user privacy and protections in hardware and software.




The new ad take a fun jab at the steps that people take in day-to-day life to protect privacy, like rolling up windows, stopping conversations when people are near, and locking doors. It culminates in the tagline "if privacy matters in your life, it should matter to the phone your life is on."





The new video is only the most recent effort Apple has made to highlight privacy as a key tenet of Apple products.

On January 4, just prior to the Consumer Electronics Show, Apple hung a massive billboard saying "what happens on your iPhone, stays on your iPhone" on the side of a hotel, overlooking the conference center. In October 2018, Apple debuted a new privacy portal, allowing users the ability to download all of the information Apple retains about you.

Apple has repeatedly and publicly fought to keep user data away from prying eyes. Apple CEO Tim Cook has repeatedly advised Apple believes privacy is a "fundamental human right," a statement it has historically featured prominently, and repeated many times.

The iPhone producer testified to a U.S. Senate committee hearing in September, advocating support for federal privacy legislation. "Ultimately, privacy is about living in a world where you can trust that your decisions about how your personal information is shared and used are being respected," said Apple vice president of software technology Guy "Bud" Tribble," while also advising any new legislation should not place undue burdens on app developers.

This privacy philosophy has led to Apple defending user privacy from being weakened by governments and security agencies, demanding easier access to data that could help fight crime, usually by adding a backdoor. Apple and other firms believe this is not the way to go, insisting their creation is a huge risk to digital security.

Apple also submitted a formal response to an Australian draft bill to update the country's telecommunications-related laws to force private companies to provide assistance in accessing data. Apple's response called out the ambiguous language for being too broad in its coverage, while simultaneously urging for "increasingly stronger - not weaker - encryption" as a way to combat the growing number of online threats.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    We all 'get it'. Privacy is a human right. But the ad will play to the false narrative that it's about Apple's brand. Concern.
    lkruppArloTimetraveler
  • Reply 2 of 18
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 950unconfirmed, member

    Great Ad. Although "Privacy. That's Apple" should be the slogan since everything Apple is secure.


    This won't stop the idiots with their spyware devices from bringing up a FaceTime bug that was fixed long ago or some exaggerated media headline from 2013.

    cornchiplolliverGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 18
    I don't like the ad. Can't put my finger on the exact reason, but it just doesn't feel like a good ad to me. I feel like it's a good feature to advertise though.
    lkrupp
  • Reply 4 of 18
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,101member
    One of the complaints Spotify is lodging against Apple is that it gets no information about its customers from the App Store. A commenter elsewhere in these forums is willing to give up some security for access to third party app stores, claiming he should have the right to do so. I my opinion that commenter already has a choice in the matter, to switch to Android if they want to give up security for choice. The idea that if I prefer iOS and macOS over Android and Windows Apple should accommodate me by loosening its security requirements doesn’t make sense. 
    lolliverracerhomie3GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 18
    Great ad! But I would have done two things a little differently. 1) I would have used music that sounds more computer-esque and Rube Goldberg-ian like: and 2) I would have paid for permission to use clips from popular movies to make people try to figure out which clip came from which movie. But if not at the very least it should say at the end "Created using an iPhone X."
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 18
    It’s a weak ad.

    But, it doesn’t compare iOS vs Android like Mac vs PC.

    It doesn’t go into what Apple is actually doing to ensure users privacy.

    It could have been a 2sec ad and been just as effective.  It doesn’t make me want to go out and buy and iPhone...

    Rather than not offend anyone, the message is as diluted as possible.

    The ad makes you wonder how passionate Apple is about privacy... that’s not a good thing.

    Apple IS passionate about privacy, but I only know that because I follow Apple.  


  • Reply 7 of 18
    The ad was pretty good. I liked it. Funny and to the point.
    GeorgeBMacwonkothesanewatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 18
    It’s a weak ad.

    But, it doesn’t compare iOS vs Android like Mac vs PC.

    It doesn’t go into what Apple is actually doing to ensure users privacy.

    It could have been a 2sec ad and been just as effective.  It doesn’t make me want to go out and buy and iPhone...

    Rather than not offend anyone, the message is as diluted as possible.

    The ad makes you wonder how passionate Apple is about privacy... that’s not a good thing.

    Apple IS passionate about privacy, but I only know that because I follow Apple.  



    Jesus, Sean. Ever the naysayer, eh?
    edited March 15 fastasleeproundaboutnowwonkothesanewatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 18
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,990member
    It’s a weak ad.

    But, it doesn’t compare iOS vs Android like Mac vs PC.

    It doesn’t go into what Apple is actually doing to ensure users privacy.

    It could have been a 2sec ad and been just as effective.  It doesn’t make me want to go out and buy and iPhone...

    Rather than not offend anyone, the message is as diluted as possible.

    The ad makes you wonder how passionate Apple is about privacy... that’s not a good thing.

    Apple IS passionate about privacy, but I only know that because I follow Apple.  



    Jesus, Sean. Ever the naysayer, eh?
    His ad would be a bullet-point presentation of technical details about what Apple is doing to protect your personal information relative to competitors.  While that may play well with the engineering crowd, it would be a snooze for the average person.  They did a good job showing the everyday things people do to protect their personal information, and draw the comparison to the iPhone.  A much more human touch.
    edited March 15 fastasleeproundaboutnowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 18
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,869member
    Great ad! But I would have done two things a little differently. 1) I would have used music that sounds more computer-esque and Rube Goldberg-ian like: and 2) I would have paid for permission to use clips from popular movies to make people try to figure out which clip came from which movie. But if not at the very least it should say at the end "Created using an iPhone X."
    Glad Phil’s in charge. 
    wonkothesane
  • Reply 11 of 18
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,106member
    I like the ad. Good points all around. Sadly this doesn’t apply to China unless iTunes backup is used.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,515member
    It’s a weak ad.

    But, it doesn’t compare iOS vs Android like Mac vs PC.

    It doesn’t go into what Apple is actually doing to ensure users privacy.

    It could have been a 2sec ad and been just as effective.  It doesn’t make me want to go out and buy and iPhone...

    Rather than not offend anyone, the message is as diluted as possible.

    The ad makes you wonder how passionate Apple is about privacy... that’s not a good thing.

    Apple IS passionate about privacy, but I only know that because I follow Apple.  


    It got the point across in the way that Apple has always done it:   "Here is something you need that we do well."   They don't get bogged down with technical how-to details.  Nor is it diluted -- instead it goes directly at the issue and confronts it head on.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 18
    advocating support for federal privacy legislation.
    The only legislation really needed is the one to keep the government from snooping and to keep the government from trying to weaken the privacy standards of vendors like Apple.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 18
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 155member

    Great Ad. Although "Privacy. That's Apple" should be the slogan since everything Apple is secure.


    This won't stop the idiots with their spyware devices from bringing up a FaceTime bug that was fixed long ago or some exaggerated media headline from 2013.

    Yes. We all know and agree that the whole Apple ecosystem is as secure as possible. The add was focused on security and the iPhone specifically to help boost sales?
  • Reply 15 of 18
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,462member
    If Apple truly cared about our privacy, iOS would let users disable Internet access for individual apps. Lots of apps don't need the Internet to perform the tasks for which users installed them.
    The problem is: developers rely on Internet access to track us (for profit). iOS would instantly lose developer support to Android*... or so Apple likely fears. But our privacy is too important.

    *The EFF recently publicly called for Android to be imbued with the ability to disable Internet access for individual apps. And the same plea was made for iOS.
  • Reply 16 of 18
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,462member

    Yes. We all know and agree that the whole Apple ecosystem is as secure as possible [emphasis added].
    Not true. For example, see my post above. Or consider the lack of control over VPN timeouts (when a VPN is desired to hide one's location).
    edited March 15
  • Reply 17 of 18
    blah64blah64 Posts: 928member
    cpsro said:
    If Apple truly cared about our privacy, iOS would let users disable Internet access for individual apps. Lots of apps don't need the Internet to perform the tasks for which users installed them.
    The problem is: developers rely on Internet access to track us (for profit). iOS would instantly lose developer support to Android*... or so Apple likely fears. But our privacy is too important.

    *The EFF recently publicly called for Android to be imbued with the ability to disable Internet access for individual apps. And the same plea was made for iOS.
    ^^THIS^^ !!

    Something I've been advocating for years.

    There's more than one way to address this problem.
    1) As you mention, disabling internet access *by* specific apps.
    2) Disabling internet access *to* specific servers or domains.

    The latter is more akin to what Little Snitch does, and frankly, we desperate need something like Little Snitch for iOS, but it would affect a lot of developers that embed all kinds of third party trackers in their apps.  Apple has thus far decided in favor of allowing developers to take this path of embedding spyware in their apps because so many developers have decided this is how they want to make money.  Personally, I think it's a disgrace, and the whole concept of hidden costs in things that people think are "free" is a huge problem worldwide, far beyond apps.

    As it looks like Apple is accelerating their push to be recognized as one of the corporate leaders in data privacy, perhaps now is the time to start pushing them to either:
    a) Open up more of the developer APIs to allow for something like Little Snitch for iOS
    b) Build it themselves

    As consumers we do have some, if limited, power to bring this to Apple management's attention.  Now is a good time.  Start writing.
    edited March 15 fastasleep
  • Reply 18 of 18
    This could end up being one of the most valuable ads ever.
    watto_cobra
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