Sonos & Ikea AirPlay 2-compatible Symfonisk speakers will cost as little as $99

Posted:
in iPhone edited April 9
As anticipated, Sonos and Ikea on Monday revealed two upcoming speakers meant to do double-duty as room decoration, while offering "smart" features like Apple's AirPlay 2.

Ikea & Sonos Symfonisk


The Symfonisk table lamp includes volume and track control buttons, as well as two class-D digital amps, one tweeter and one mid-woofer. People wanting smart lighting functions will have to buy their own smart bulb separately.

The second speaker -- also under the Symfonisk brand -- is meant to sit on shelves or attach to walls. While it can be positioned vertically, when horizontal, it can serve as a small bookshelf in its own right. Internal specs are similar to the lamp but likely not as powerful.

Ikea & Sonos Symfonisk


Both speakers will integrate with existing Sonos systems and take advantage of that company's TruePlay technology, which tunes performance based on reverberated sound. Some other control options will include a native Ikea app and Spotify integration.

AirPlay 2 will allow Siri controls, and multi-speaker grouping without having to go through the Sonos app. By extension, the Symfonisk line will also have limited control through HomeKit.

Both the lamp and bookshelf speaker will ship in August, at prices of $179 and $99 respectively.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,391unconfirmed, member
    I've noticed companies are copying Apples simple material color and design after HomePod.
  • Reply 2 of 25
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,273member
    Buying the lamps. 
  • Reply 3 of 25
    The lamp is kinda ugly but less ugly than the Sonos One at least. Wouldn't look bad in a student flat I suppose. I do like the concept of functional furniture though, if it's done right. The bookshelf speaker looks like it would do much better on a shelf than as a shelf. A couple of those nestled between books could work.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,687member
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    svanstrom
  • Reply 5 of 25
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 89member
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    I was listening to an older track from when stereo was all the rage and wondered if there is any attempt at separation in music production anymore. Other than headphones, most music is probably played through single-speaker setups.
  • Reply 6 of 25
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,391unconfirmed, member
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?

    Who cares how much it costs of some are willing to pay? I'm waiting for HomePod surround sound. Some surround speakers can go for $300+ so it isn't unrealistic as a market especially with smart room acoustic detection in HomePods, they might sound better than more expensive setups.
  • Reply 7 of 25
    apple ][ said: What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    HomePod has seven tweeters and a single woofer, so technically it's neither a full stereo speaker or a mono speaker. That said, the human ear isn't nearly as good at hearing separation in the low frequencies as it is in higher frequencies, so if you listen to a single HomePod it's going to give the impression of full stereo. In terms of separation, a single unit is easily on par with classic boombox style systems. The advantage vs a boombox or standard compact system is that the sound quality doesn't degrade when you move away from the center...because there is no center due to the circular design of the tweeters and beam forming. 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 8 of 25
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,273member
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?

    Most have not heard a decent system with imaging.  It's not even that expensive anymore.   A pair of Elac Debut 6.2 or Jamo 803 ...a small amp and decent source material would blow people away.  I think too many people think they need the huge amps and speaker wire running everywhere.   




  • Reply 9 of 25
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 321member
    We still got to yet see a complete (recent) review of Ikea smart home products. Everything you find on YouTube and online are reviews from when the products first came to the market, that are not favourable, lots of buds and connectivity issues. I'm planning on getting the smart blinds after seeing some reviews, hopefully soon!
  • Reply 10 of 25
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,739member
    foregoneconclusion said
    [...] the human ear isn't nearly as good at hearing separation in the low frequencies as it is in higher frequencies
    You got the result right but the reason wrong. Being able to get away with a single bass speaker has nothing to do with our hearing. Humans can localize the source of a low frequency sound just as well as a high frequency one. The reason single woofers work is room dimensions.

    Bass waves are long. When the length of the wave exceeds the shortest dimension of the room, it becomes impossible to trace its origin. High frequencies produce much shorter waves so the room dimensions don't affect them the same way. The smaller the room, the higher the frequency at which the signal becomes essentially omnidirectional. Of course, that means the opposite is also true -- the larger the space, the LOWER the frequency at which the source disappears. People with large listening spaces should probably stick with traditional full-range stereo.
    mbenz1962
  • Reply 11 of 25
    sandorsandor Posts: 542member
    barthrh said:
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    I was listening to an older track from when stereo was all the rage and wondered if there is any attempt at separation in music production anymore. Other than headphones, most music is probably played through single-speaker setups.

    i would venture a guess that most music today is listened to via headphones.
    a distant second is probably in the car.

    so that would mean most is listening via the most discrete stereo setup.

  • Reply 12 of 25
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 508member
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?

    Who cares how much it costs of some are willing to pay? I'm waiting for HomePod surround sound. Some surround speakers can go for $300+ so it isn't unrealistic as a market especially with smart room acoustic detection in HomePods, they might sound better than more expensive setups.
    I suppose they could do surround by syncing a number of HomePods together, but that would mean multiples of $300 each to accomplish that.

    Individual HomePods can create decent stereo, bouncing sound off the wall behind the device, and there are Dolby Atmos enabled speakers that bounce sound off the ceiling to create vertical presence, but I think it would be something of a trick for a HomePod in front of you to undetectably send sound past your head to then bounce off the wall behind you in order to create a surround sound effect. Never say never, but I think it would be exceedingly difficult to create surround sound without speakers both in front of you and behind you.
  • Reply 13 of 25
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 743member
    All I want to know is whether the bulbs in Symfonisk are Homekit compatible and whether I need a bridge for that to work. And I can't find that information.
  • Reply 14 of 25
    mikaelstangemikaelstange Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    All I want to know is whether the bulbs in Symfonisk are Homekit compatible and whether I need a bridge for that to work. And I can't find that information.
    It’s E27 bulbs in the lamp. So you can put any smart bulb in it. 
  • Reply 15 of 25
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 743member
    All I want to know is whether the bulbs in Symfonisk are Homekit compatible and whether I need a bridge for that to work. And I can't find that information.
    It’s E27 bulbs in the lamp. So you can put any smart bulb in it. 
    Ahh, ok. I was expecting the bulbs that come with it might already be smart because the article said "the Symfonisk line will also have limited control through HomeKit."
  • Reply 16 of 25
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,101member
    barthrh said:
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    I was listening to an older track from when stereo was all the rage and wondered if there is any attempt at separation in music production anymore. Other than headphones, most music is probably played through single-speaker setups.
    What? Are you really suggesting stereo is out and most music is mastered in mono now? That’s absurd. 
  • Reply 17 of 25
    lorin schultz said: You got the result right but the reason wrong. Being able to get away with a single bass speaker has nothing to do with our hearing. Humans can localize the source of a low frequency sound just as well as a high frequency one. The reason single woofers work is room dimensions.
    Okay, but ask yourself this question: are highs and mids more likely to be used for stereo separation in a professional mix than lows? Regardless of the room size, the answer to that question is always going to be the same. 
  • Reply 18 of 25
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,371member
    barthrh said:
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    I was listening to an older track from when stereo was all the rage and wondered if there is any attempt at separation in music production anymore. Other than headphones, most music is probably played through single-speaker setups.
    What? Are you really suggesting stereo is out and most music is mastered in mono now? That’s absurd. 
    What? Did you not read his post? It's your 'conclusion' that's absurd.

    Consider the number of 'feature' BT speakers sold for use with iOS devices. Very few of them will work with a second BT speaker, and fewer still will then become discrete Left and Right channel speakers. And of those BT (and AirPlay) speakers, they're usually small enough that if they offer stereo from a single enclosure, the distance between channels is so small, that without some DSP magic, they may as well be mono. So headphones (stereo) and single speaker (mono, stereo-ish) for playback, not mastering is common, convenient, and good enough for many.


    Most have not heard a decent system with imaging.  It's not even that expensive anymore.   A pair of Elac Debut 6.2 or Jamo 803 ...a small amp and decent source material would blow people away.  I think too many people think they need the huge amps and speaker wire running everywhere.   
    I think this is exactly the problem. That and it's not easy or convenient for people to learn what to listen for to appreciate an improvement in sound and soundstage. For a lot, if given the chance, their education consists of maybe an element or two they didn't hear from mediocre to poor speakers and headphones and may miss when going back to old crap gear.

    Where as if there was somebody to actually point out the differences as they're listening, lightbulbs would go on. Knowing what to listen for would make a big difference.

    It also doesn't help that a lot of 'listeners' think good sound is the product of 'turning the bass up to 11'.
    hmurchison
  • Reply 19 of 25
    sdc2807sdc2807 Posts: 3member
    apple ][ said:
    It's funny how all of these "smart" speakers that have emerged in recent years are being sold as a single device and not a pair.

    I have not tried or listened to the Apple HomePod yet, and I am aware that you can hook up multiples, but I assume that most people use only one of them, as they are not that cheap.

    What ever happened to stereo sound? Do people just not care anymore?
    I have two Homepods. The sound from one is fantastic. The sound from two blows me away. They are linked as a stereo pair. Music definitely played in ‘stereo’.

    i did link them to my Apple TV to provide incredible sound for movies for a while! Really really good! That also played in ‘stereo’. 

    Love them. 
    hmurchison
  • Reply 20 of 25
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,739member
    lorin schultz said: You got the result right but the reason wrong. Being able to get away with a single bass speaker has nothing to do with our hearing. Humans can localize the source of a low frequency sound just as well as a high frequency one. The reason single woofers work is room dimensions.
    Okay, but ask yourself this question: are highs and mids more likely to be used for stereo separation in a professional mix than lows? Regardless of the room size, the answer to that question is always going to be the same. 
    I actually DID ask myself that question, as I was going to suggest that stereo separation of the bottom may matter more to classical listeners than those who listen to pop because very little of the bottom is split in modern music. I chose not to write that because i decided it's wrong. While bass guitar and kick drum do usually go right down the middle, piano, synths, and electronic beats, all of which have lots of low frequency content, are usually mixed stereo.
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