Qualcomm and Apple settle, Samsung folds, Facebook failing at security, and more on the Ap...

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This week on the AppleInsider Podcast, William and Victor close the books on the Qualcomm suit, Samsung has problems with a folding phone, and Facebook steals contacts from 1.5M people.

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AppleInsider editor Victor Marks and writer William Gallagher discuss:
  • Qualcomm and Apple settle all of their worldwide disputes. This was a surprise to us both. It has knock-on effects for Intel, MediaTek, and Apple's own modem pursuits.
  • William sees this as a loss for Apple - Apple ends up paying more to Qualcomm per device, and a big patent licensing payment. At the same time, if you want to have a reliable 5G iPhone in 2021, Qualcomm is probably the best source.
  • Samsung made a phone with a folding screen, and many reviewers have broken theirs within days. Amazingly, Samsung intends to sell these devices.
  • Apple opens an iPhone recycling center in Texas, where robots will disassemble more than 200 phones per hour, per robot.
  • 2019 iPhones will attempt no such risky folds, but instead are rumored to have more, better cameras.
  • Facebook harvests contact information from 1.5 Million users. Accidentally. Victor suspects that precisely no one signs into user emails and programmatically uploads contact information accidentally, some programmer had to intentionally code this, in conjunction with a team within Facebook.
  • But if you do trust Facebook (how, we wonder), the Facebook camera and smart speaker device, Portal, is on sale for $99 USD. Facebook is working on their own AI Voice Assistant to add to it.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    Apple settled with Qualcomm because Intel was not able to deliver 5g chipsets on time, not the other way around. It is obvious Apple could not just let go 2020 5g cell phone markets because of Intel. Without any other alternative in hands, Apple naturally went back to Qualcomm. Furthermore, Apple also had issues with Qualcomm's patents which allow better efficiency size- and heat-wise. Qualcomm could have lived without Apple anyway, which it did, but apparently Apple could not - Apple could not jump the whole 2020 without 5g iPhones sales.

    Result: Apple completely lost the fight - I am pretty sure the terms of agreement must have been much more favorable to Qualcomm.
    edited April 19
  • Reply 2 of 7
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 722member
    Hsdonn said:
    Apple settled with Qualcomm because Intel was not able to deliver 5g chipsets on time, not the other way around. It is obvious Apple could not just let go 2020 5g cell phone markets because of Intel. Without any other alternative in hands, Apple naturally went back to Qualcomm. Furthermore, Apple also had issues with Qualcomm's patents which allow better efficiency size- and heat-wise. Qualcomm could have lived without Apple anyway, which it did, but apparently Apple could not - Apple could not jump the whole 2020 without 5g iPhones sales.

    Result: Apple completely lost the fight - I am pretty sure the terms of agreement must have been much more favorable to Qualcomm.
    Intel decided to get out of the 5G game. You think that was a snap decision after Apple decided to settle with Qualcomm? Come on That's like saying Apple waits to see what Samusng releases and designs the new iPhone.


    I also think Qualcomm was hurt by Apple not using them.. I don't think they would be fine with Apple's business going forward.

    How badly could Qualcomm be hurt?

    Apple has already cut off the flow of royalty payments that analysts estimate amounts to $3 billion of Qualcomm’s revenue and a substantial portion of its profits. The chip sales to Apple bring in another $1.5 billion to $2 billion, though with a much lower profit margin, analyst Stacy Rasgon at Bernstein Research estimates. Shares of Qualcomm, which were down 13% since Apple filed its lawsuit in January, sunk another 8% on Tuesday on news of Apple’s planned chip swap.


    This article is from late 2017 when Apple filed against Qualcomm...



    Just my 2c.. If Apple settling with Qualcomm means we get better chips in our phones I am all for it. 

  • Reply 3 of 7
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,290member

    Samsung folds


    Me at first 🤨🧐🤯

    Then 😏 
  • Reply 4 of 7
    This was the most delightful of podcasts.

    I love it when Victor is in a good mood! :)

    William is witty and fun as usual! Made me smile/chuckle a lot!

    Talking about the folding phone monstrosities and their mishaps... 

    Victor: 'You have to know when to, er....William: fold!' Just brilliant!

    Good work, guys! I've pretty much stopped reading Ai and just catching up on Apple news via this Podcast.

    Here's a Podcast William I'm sure will enjoy! http://rss.acast.com/adambuxton with David Mitchell. A bit 'ramble-y' but very witty and intelligent.

    Best Regards! 


    cornchip
  • Reply 5 of 7
    I think Intel decided it could not compete in the 5G cellular modem business and told Apple. Apple had no option but to settle with Qualcomm. Intel will probably completely get out of the cellular modem business once they have fulfilled their license contract with Apple for the 4G modems.
    cornchip
  • Reply 6 of 7
    neutrino23neutrino23 Posts: 1,525member
    The devil is probably in the details, but the settlement doesn’t seem bad for Apple. Qualcom had been pushing for up to a 5% royalty. At $9 a phone that is about 1% and roughly what Apple had negotiated for earlier years.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    jcs2305 said:
    Hsdonn said:
    Apple settled with Qualcomm because Intel was not able to deliver 5g chipsets on time, not the other way around. It is obvious Apple could not just let go 2020 5g cell phone markets because of Intel. Without any other alternative in hands, Apple naturally went back to Qualcomm. Furthermore, Apple also had issues with Qualcomm's patents which allow better efficiency size- and heat-wise. Qualcomm could have lived without Apple anyway, which it did, but apparently Apple could not - Apple could not jump the whole 2020 without 5g iPhones sales.

    Result: Apple completely lost the fight - I am pretty sure the terms of agreement must have been much more favorable to Qualcomm.
    Intel decided to get out of the 5G game. You think that was a snap decision after Apple decided to settle with Qualcomm? Come on That's like saying Apple waits to see what Samusng releases and designs the new iPhone.


    I also think Qualcomm was hurt by Apple not using them.. I don't think they would be fine with Apple's business going forward.

    How badly could Qualcomm be hurt?

    Apple has already cut off the flow of royalty payments that analysts estimate amounts to $3 billion of Qualcomm’s revenue and a substantial portion of its profits. The chip sales to Apple bring in another $1.5 billion to $2 billion, though with a much lower profit margin, analyst Stacy Rasgon at Bernstein Research estimates. Shares of Qualcomm, which were down 13% since Apple filed its lawsuit in January, sunk another 8% on Tuesday on news of Apple’s planned chip swap.


    This article is from late 2017 when Apple filed against Qualcomm...



    Just my 2c.. If Apple settling with Qualcomm means we get better chips in our phones I am all for it. 

    https://www.itproportal.com/news/intel-ceo-reveals-more-on-5g-chip-exit/

    “In light of the announcement of Apple and Qualcomm, we assessed the prospects for us to make money while delivering this technology for smartphones and concluded at the time that we just didn’t see a path,” commented Bob Swan, intel CEO, in an interview with The Wall Street Journal.

    Of course, Intel knew that Apple would turn to Qualcomm because Intel knew more than anybody that their chips were bad, but before Apple eventually turning to Qualcomm, how would you expect Intel itself abandoning the business. All Intel needed was a good cause: Intel was secretly waiting Apple to turn to Qualcomm.
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