Huawei touts its 'substantial contributions' to Android and says it will continue supporti...

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In response to Google's revoking its license to use Android, Huawei has announced that it will continue to provide support and updates to current phones and tablets.




Chinese technology firm Huawei has responded to Google's decision to revoke its Android license. A company spokesman said that Huawei had been a major factor in the success of Android and that it would continue to provide security updates to its existing customers.

"We have made substantial contributions to the development and growth of Android around the world," the spokesman told Reuters. "Huawei will continue to provide security updates and after-sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products, covering those that have been sold and that are still in stock globally."

The spokesman did not address specific plans for how the firm would continue, but did claim that Huawei would continue with its phones. "We will continue to build a safe and sustainable software ecosystem," he said, "in order to provide the best experience for all users globally."

Google revoked Huawei's license for Android after the US Department of Commerce put the company on its Entity List, a blacklist of firms considered to potentially represent a national security risk.

The move means that the company will have to rely on an open source version of the Android operating system. This is likely to mean its phones won't be able to use key services and apps such as Gmail and YouTube.

The US blacklist is also affecting Huawei's hardware suppliers as both American ones and now Europe's Infineon have suspended sales to the company.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Dying company lashes out. They'll make every claim they can to try and be relevant before they lose everything. What even is impressive about selling $20 phones to third world countries? Nevermind selling more $20 devices than other $20 device makers.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,796member
    Dying company lashes out. They'll make every claim they can to try and be relevant before they lose everything. What even is impressive about selling $20 phones to third world countries? Nevermind selling more $20 devices than other $20 device makers.
    If what you are saying were even half true it would be supremely impressive: providing phone for people in third world countries that would have hard time purchasing them otherwise.

    The problem, and it is huge, is that what you are saying isn't even near half true.

    Huawei is a massive commercial threat to the Trump administration, which has nothing to counter it. Trump would love to have something, some company, anything to shift power in the emerging 5G era.

    So, without anything to stop the deployment of Huawei systems worldwide and seeing the charade of 'national security risks' bear no fruit and how allies refused to act without seeing evidence (and were later threatened for not bowing to US demands), Trump has shoved aside all the pretexts he has used up to now and moved into uncharted territory.

    Now, he will have to wait and see what the Chinese response is and, given the precedent he has now set, China could choose (validly) an unrestrained tit-for-tat response which could escalate things even further.

     
  • Reply 3 of 11
    ivanhivanh Posts: 353member
    I’m expecting to hear from Oracle about banning JAVA developed apps to put on Huawei products.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Dying company lashes out. They'll make every claim they can to try and be relevant before they lose everything. What even is impressive about selling $20 phones to third world countries? Nevermind selling more $20 devices than other $20 device makers.
    It did more than $100B in revenue last year and has been growing at 20% pa over the last few years. In Europe, where it's not banned, it's selling good quality handsets in very large volumes not to mention the carrier-grade networking equipment and is a major part of the cloud infrastructure. Not bad for a dying company. 
    avon b7
  • Reply 5 of 11
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 813member
    Bragging while losing sounds like #45
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    jumejume Posts: 192member
    Dying company lashes out. They'll make every claim they can to try and be relevant before they lose everything. What even is impressive about selling $20 phones to third world countries? Nevermind selling more $20 devices than other $20 device makers.
    Not even close. Huawei has massive financial backing and if anything Google will loose a lot here. What I think it will happen is that Huawei going to start its own os development either from open source Android or something else. They have enormous customer base in Asia and Latin America which is about two thirds of world population. And they are Chinese, they will find a way.

    I think this is just another stupid move by Trump.
    bloggerblog
  • Reply 7 of 11
    FatmanFatman Posts: 291member
    Huawei is China, it is not dying, it is powerful, huge and growing.

    The State subsidizes Huawei products so they can dump phones - and now 5G tech - on the market for 1. increased market share, 2. destroy the competition, 3. steal information from users. It may be too late to stop this beast, since they have undoubtedly stolen enough software and hardware designs to now be self sufficient. I am not a fan of Trump, but wimpy Obama failed by not starting agreements with China years ago, when the US had more leverage. Trump is on the other end of the spectrum -- a testosterone fueled loose cannon, illogical and often unreasonable. Buckle up fellows ... there's a crazy ride ahead for all of us!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    LordeHawkLordeHawk Posts: 153member
    Funny how Finland found the back door and Huawei’s response is that they don’t open it...

    Most of Googles services are not allowed past the Great Firewall of China, so switching to open source Android will have limited impact.  It will be an irritation but it really only slows down the speed that they get updates. Google will not loose much, they don’t get any data from Google services in Chinese.
    I would bet money that Huawei branched off Android in the past year and is nearing an OS announcement.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,711member
    avon b7 said:
    [...] seeing the charade of 'national security risks' bear no fruit 
    Having only very passively followed the story, I thought the risk associated with Huawei infrastructure products was pretty well established. Didn't the Dutch government recently come to the same conclusion? Are you saying they're lying?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    1348513485 Posts: 49member
    avon b7 said:

    Now, he will have to wait and see what the Chinese response is and, given the precedent he has now set, China could choose (validly) an unrestrained tit-for-tat response which could escalate things even further.

     
    This is about the only part of your post that is without much debate, and it concerns rare earth metals (China has more than anyone else) needed for technology and defense industries, and active pharmaceutical ingredients and antibiotics, for which China is often the sole global source.

    If they want to make it difficult, they're in a good position to really ratchet things up.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,796member

    avon b7 said:
    [...] seeing the charade of 'national security risks' bear no fruit 
    Having only very passively followed the story, I thought the risk associated with Huawei infrastructure products was pretty well established. Didn't the Dutch government recently come to the same conclusion? Are you saying they're lying?
    AFAIK the Dutch were simply investigating an accusation (denied by Huawei).

    The 'risks' involved with ICT infrastructure are universal to ICT manufacturers. They are no higher or lower for any manufacturer although Huawei has speculated that in the case of the US it would be harder for the NSA to get what it wants with Huawei involved (an allusion to AT&T being a willing partner to the NSA in previous cases as highlighted by the Snowden leaks apparently).

    The are no well established beliefs. There is debate, almost all of it political and commercial and beyond the charade of national security there is actually nothing to be had of any reach. The 'national security' house of cards came crashing down when governments (being pressured to ban Huawei by US politicians) actually asked to see some evidence. There was none and the US went on record as saying none was necessary. An opinion not shared by many governments.

    Then the threats to US allies began and they still had little effect. Trump tweeted he didn't want to 'win' by blocking other companies. The opening speeches in a Senate committee confirmed US fears of losing to China on both technology and influence.

    Now, after having failed to get his way, Trump has literally played the national security emergency card as the only way to thwart Huawei.

    The problem is that that card is the 'red button' card and now China is free to play the exact same card and if they do, everybody will get hurt.

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