AMD Radeon RX 5700 series launches with 7nm GPUs, up to 10.14 teraflops of performance

Posted:
in General Discussion
AMD has launched three new cards in its Radeon RX 5000 range that all use 7-nanometer processes for the GPU, with the Radeon RX5700, XT, and 50th Anniversary Edition providing over 10 teraflops of performance as a more value-oriented alternative to the Vega cards.




Launched two weeks after AMD first teased the RX 5000 series at Computex, the RX 5700 series consists of three cards that are built using AMD's RDNA gaming architecture and use the Navi GPU family. Navi was previously advised as being a refined version of Vega that offers 25% better performance per clock and a 50% improvement per watt of power used, via AMD's usage of a 7-nanometer production process.

The three cards start off with the Radeon RX5700, which offers 36 compute units, 2,304 stream processors, and 8GB of GDDR6 memory. With a base clock of 1.465GHz rising to 1.625 as its "game clock" and up to 1.725 when boosted, the card is said to provide up to 7.95 teraflops of performance.

The middle card in the range is the RX5700XT, which ups the compute units to 40 and the stream processors to 2,560, while using the same memory. The clock speeds are increased to 1.605GHz, 1.755GHz, and 1.905GHz for base, game, and boosted respectively, and it can offer 9.75 teraflops to users.

The third card is the Radon RX 5700 XT 50th Anniversary Edition, which offers the same compute units, stream processors, and memory quantity as the RX 5700 XT. The difference is in the clock speeds, with each pushed to 1,68GHz, 1.83GHz, and 1.98GHz, resulting in a maximum performance of up to 10.14 teraflops for that specific card.

All of the cards also have Radeon Anti-Lag to reduce input-to-display response times by up to 31 percent, DisplayPort 1.4 with Display Stream Compression for up to 8K-resolution HDR video running at 60Hz or 4K HDR at up to 144Hz, and Radeon Image Sharpening. The cards are also the first to support PCIe 4.0, enabling them to work with new motherboards using the standard.

The new cards are aimed at more day-to-day users, so are not to be expected to be directly compared with the Radeon Pro Vega II and Duo MPX modules announced with the Mac Pro. Those cards, designed for high-performance workloads, offer up to 14 teraflops of performance 64 compute units, and 4,096 stream processors per GPU, and are equipped with 32 gigabytes of the better-performing HBM2.

AMD will start shipping the RX 5700 cards from July 7, priced at $379 for the RX 5700, $449 for the RX 5700 XT, and $499 for the 50th anniversary edition.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    techsavytechsavy Posts: 34member
    These look cool, I hope they are as powerful as they seem and can rival EVGAs cards.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,456member
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
  • Reply 3 of 16
    bigtdsbigtds Posts: 151member
    Sounds promising and nice to see some competition but I'll stick with Nvidia.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 4 of 16
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,058member
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
  • Reply 5 of 16
    thttht Posts: 3,317member
    You know, I think I understand a beauty mark just like any other person, but what’s the deal with the Tivo-esque dent in the housing of the card? They couldn’t at least shape it so that it looks like a wheel flare from a car?
  • Reply 6 of 16
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 835member
    For comparison, what's the MSRP of the Radeon Pro Vega II? I tried googling it and all I got was specs for it, the MSRP wasn't mentioned. I'm not interested in what the Radeon Pro Vega II is actually selling for, only the MSRP, since that's what was apparently mentioned in this article. I even visited the AMD Radeon website and they didn't mention the MSRP.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,752member
    Prior to going the Mac way, I used to build my own rigs for 10+ years.  While I wouldn't ever go back to doing that, the tinkerer in my just salivates at how much horsepower and technology is packed in the modern enthusiast graphics card.  Heck, if I had time to re-live my gamer life, I certainly would be having a blast with all this.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 5,004administrator
    For comparison, what's the MSRP of the Radeon Pro Vega II? I tried googling it and all I got was specs for it, the MSRP wasn't mentioned. I'm not interested in what the Radeon Pro Vega II is actually selling for, only the MSRP, since that's what was apparently mentioned in this article. I even visited the AMD Radeon website and they didn't mention the MSRP.
    No idea yet.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    deminsddeminsd Posts: 143member
    I'm assuming these cards are for Windows users and not the new Mac Pro, despite being compared to the Duo MPX Modules?  
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 5,004administrator
    deminsd said:
    I'm assuming these cards are for Windows users and not the new Mac Pro, despite being compared to the Duo MPX Modules?  
    Everything from the RX560 to Radeon VII works in macOS. These will come eventually, and probably before the Mac Pro ships.
  • Reply 11 of 16
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,704member
    sflocal said:
    Prior to going the Mac way, I used to build my own rigs for 10+ years.  While I wouldn't ever go back to doing that, the tinkerer in my just salivates at how much horsepower and technology is packed in the modern enthusiast graphics card.  Heck, if I had time to re-live my gamer life, I certainly would be having a blast with all this.
    Well, perhaps at some point these will be able to be used in some eGPU housings for the MBP. They are also very useful for productive activities, like video encoding.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    MacPro said:
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
    You won't see much improvement over the 1080 from this. AMD claims the XT is roughly on par with the 2070, which is barely better than a 1080.
    tipoo said:
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
    The perf/watt may not be as good but it's *much* closer. Closer enough that that's not likely to be a significant factor compared to NVidia's current or next-gen cards.

    If you assume unchanged pricing, against current-gen NVidia 20xx and 16xx, it's a decent match-up. Maybe even a winner for many people, as the RTX stuff has really limited appeal, and that's not likely to change in the next year. (You might own your card longer than that, but most people don't make buying decisions based on how their card will perform towards the end of its lifespan).

    However, that's a bad assumption. NVidia has new cards coming, and can always lower their prices. We won't know what the new cards bring until they're here, but so far nobody thinks NV is going to make huge strides with their next releases- more measured steps. And they will likely keep prices at current levels, because why not? At least until AMD takes a big bite out of them, which will take a while (at least). Given that, my expectation is that AMD will react by lowering prices on the 57xx, and you'll still have a matchup that leaves AMD at least competitive, though in a lower price bracket.

    That, in fact, will be good for consumers, and possibly even for AMD and NVidia if it grows the market. We might also see a 5800 with more CUs and/or more RAM or HBM (though the latter is unlikely, I think).


  • Reply 13 of 16
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,456member
    MacPro said:
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
    You won't see much improvement over the 1080 from this. AMD claims the XT is roughly on par with the 2070, which is barely better than a 1080.
    tipoo said:
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
    The perf/watt may not be as good but it's *much* closer. Closer enough that that's not likely to be a significant factor compared to NVidia's current or next-gen cards.

    If you assume unchanged pricing, against current-gen NVidia 20xx and 16xx, it's a decent match-up. Maybe even a winner for many people, as the RTX stuff has really limited appeal, and that's not likely to change in the next year. (You might own your card longer than that, but most people don't make buying decisions based on how their card will perform towards the end of its lifespan).

    However, that's a bad assumption. NVidia has new cards coming, and can always lower their prices. We won't know what the new cards bring until they're here, but so far nobody thinks NV is going to make huge strides with their next releases- more measured steps. And they will likely keep prices at current levels, because why not? At least until AMD takes a big bite out of them, which will take a while (at least). Given that, my expectation is that AMD will react by lowering prices on the 57xx, and you'll still have a matchup that leaves AMD at least competitive, though in a lower price bracket.

    That, in fact, will be good for consumers, and possibly even for AMD and NVidia if it grows the market. We might also see a 5800 with more CUs and/or more RAM or HBM (though the latter is unlikely, I think).


    Thanks for the heads up on that.  Would I better getting a second GTX 1080 and using SLI?  I know in Bootcamp on my 2013 Mac Pro I can run Catalyst to get a big improvement.
  • Reply 14 of 16
    MacPro said:
    MacPro said:
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
    You won't see much improvement over the 1080 from this. AMD claims the XT is roughly on par with the 2070, which is barely better than a 1080.
    tipoo said:
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
    The perf/watt may not be as good but it's *much* closer. Closer enough that that's not likely to be a significant factor compared to NVidia's current or next-gen cards.

    If you assume unchanged pricing, against current-gen NVidia 20xx and 16xx, it's a decent match-up. Maybe even a winner for many people, as the RTX stuff has really limited appeal, and that's not likely to change in the next year. (You might own your card longer than that, but most people don't make buying decisions based on how their card will perform towards the end of its lifespan).

    However, that's a bad assumption. NVidia has new cards coming, and can always lower their prices. We won't know what the new cards bring until they're here, but so far nobody thinks NV is going to make huge strides with their next releases- more measured steps. And they will likely keep prices at current levels, because why not? At least until AMD takes a big bite out of them, which will take a while (at least). Given that, my expectation is that AMD will react by lowering prices on the 57xx, and you'll still have a matchup that leaves AMD at least competitive, though in a lower price bracket.

    That, in fact, will be good for consumers, and possibly even for AMD and NVidia if it grows the market. We might also see a 5800 with more CUs and/or more RAM or HBM (though the latter is unlikely, I think).


    Thanks for the heads up on that.  Would I better getting a second GTX 1080 and using SLI?  I know in Bootcamp on my 2013 Mac Pro I can run Catalyst to get a big improvement.
    If SLI will actually work (I don't know) then definitely.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 5,004administrator
    MacPro said:
    MacPro said:
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
    You won't see much improvement over the 1080 from this. AMD claims the XT is roughly on par with the 2070, which is barely better than a 1080.
    tipoo said:
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
    The perf/watt may not be as good but it's *much* closer. Closer enough that that's not likely to be a significant factor compared to NVidia's current or next-gen cards.

    If you assume unchanged pricing, against current-gen NVidia 20xx and 16xx, it's a decent match-up. Maybe even a winner for many people, as the RTX stuff has really limited appeal, and that's not likely to change in the next year. (You might own your card longer than that, but most people don't make buying decisions based on how their card will perform towards the end of its lifespan).

    However, that's a bad assumption. NVidia has new cards coming, and can always lower their prices. We won't know what the new cards bring until they're here, but so far nobody thinks NV is going to make huge strides with their next releases- more measured steps. And they will likely keep prices at current levels, because why not? At least until AMD takes a big bite out of them, which will take a while (at least). Given that, my expectation is that AMD will react by lowering prices on the 57xx, and you'll still have a matchup that leaves AMD at least competitive, though in a lower price bracket.

    That, in fact, will be good for consumers, and possibly even for AMD and NVidia if it grows the market. We might also see a 5800 with more CUs and/or more RAM or HBM (though the latter is unlikely, I think).


    Thanks for the heads up on that.  Would I better getting a second GTX 1080 and using SLI?  I know in Bootcamp on my 2013 Mac Pro I can run Catalyst to get a big improvement.
    If SLI will actually work (I don't know) then definitely.
    SLI should work in Windows. It won't work in macOS.
  • Reply 16 of 16
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,456member
    MacPro said:
    MacPro said:
    I might be tempted to take the GTX 1080 out of my PC and throw in the RX 5700 XT once I see all the tests on a 4K monitor or higher.  I can only get 60 f.p.s. in GTA V in 4K with the GTX (all setting maxed out) and it dips down to about 30 f.p.s. with flying and anywhere with a lot of objects.
    You won't see much improvement over the 1080 from this. AMD claims the XT is roughly on par with the 2070, which is barely better than a 1080.
    tipoo said:
    I had high hopes for RDNA's performance per watt uplift, but it looks like even being on 7nm and a new architecture, and with no silicon area spent on RTX-type dedicated hardware, this is still coming in under Nvidias performance per watt on 12nm. 

    Now Nvidias rumor is a minor refresh soon with a price drop, so the appeal of these goes away immediately. And that's not even thinking about what Nvidias architectural efficiency will look like on 7nm, they're still on their smurf account on 12nm. 
    The perf/watt may not be as good but it's *much* closer. Closer enough that that's not likely to be a significant factor compared to NVidia's current or next-gen cards.

    If you assume unchanged pricing, against current-gen NVidia 20xx and 16xx, it's a decent match-up. Maybe even a winner for many people, as the RTX stuff has really limited appeal, and that's not likely to change in the next year. (You might own your card longer than that, but most people don't make buying decisions based on how their card will perform towards the end of its lifespan).

    However, that's a bad assumption. NVidia has new cards coming, and can always lower their prices. We won't know what the new cards bring until they're here, but so far nobody thinks NV is going to make huge strides with their next releases- more measured steps. And they will likely keep prices at current levels, because why not? At least until AMD takes a big bite out of them, which will take a while (at least). Given that, my expectation is that AMD will react by lowering prices on the 57xx, and you'll still have a matchup that leaves AMD at least competitive, though in a lower price bracket.

    That, in fact, will be good for consumers, and possibly even for AMD and NVidia if it grows the market. We might also see a 5800 with more CUs and/or more RAM or HBM (though the latter is unlikely, I think).


    Thanks for the heads up on that.  Would I better getting a second GTX 1080 and using SLI?  I know in Bootcamp on my 2013 Mac Pro I can run Catalyst to get a big improvement.
    If SLI will actually work (I don't know) then definitely.
    SLI should work in Windows. It won't work in macOS.
    Yes, I'm talking about my Dell I use for games.  That said I am not sure it can take a second GTX 1080 it's just a mid-size desktop i7.
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