Hands on: Razer's Nommo Pro 2.1 speakers for Mac & Windows

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited June 12
Continuing our look at some of the Mac desktop speaker options out there, we're turning to the Razer Nommo Pro -- probably one of the most powerful choices short of ones that won't fit on a desk.

Razer Nommo Pro


Razer isn't known for its subtlety, often conjuring up images of wildly flashing lights and its iconic graphic logo, which seemingly belongs on the cover on a '90s prog-metal album.

The company has occasionally tried to adopt a more refined style in recent times, and in some ways the Nommo Pro exemplifies this. Its satellites occupy a minimal footprint, use text logos, and limit color effects to the base.

"Minimal" is a relative term however. Those satellites still occupy plenty of vertical space, and the Pro's cylindrical subwoofer is one of the largest I've seen for any home system, on computers or otherwise. It's hard to overstate how gigantic it is -- it's bigger than some mid-tower PCs.

Razer Nommo Pro


The benefit of course is that the Pro is absurdly powerful. It has a frequency response between 35 hertz and 20 kilohertz, and if you crank up the bass, it will shake any room you could possibly want. Apartment dwellers might as well skip it unless they're on the ground floor.

Connection options include USB, optical, 3.5mm, and Bluetooth 4.2. You'll want to connect via USB if at all possible, since that enables control via Razer's Synapse app. Note however that only Windows users have any serious desktop control by way Synapse 3, which has yet to be ported to macOS. If you're on a Mac, you're stuck with Synapse 2.

The good news is that there's a Nommo Pro iPhone app, which connects via Bluetooth. This lets you tweak volume and bass levels, adjust lighting, change sources, and switch between THX, Dolby, and custom EQ settings. There are even multiple Dolby presets for music, movies, and games.

Razer NommoPro iPhone app


There'll be plenty more to say in our full review, but for now I'll say that the Pro is the best-sounding system I've ever sat in front of my computer. Imagine having Sonos Ones and a Sub sitting inches away and you can begin to imagine how good it is, whether you're listening to ambient, folk, classical, or metal.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
  • Reply 2 of 11
    Thanks for the review, but it would be more useful with a product link and pricing information. 
  • Reply 3 of 11
    wlymwlym Posts: 90member
    $499! Yikes.
  • Reply 4 of 11
    roakeroake Posts: 640member
    Need a price in the review.  That’s basic to reviews.  Also, the product link was hidden deep in the review.  Needs to be prominent.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    bigtdsbigtds Posts: 65member
    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
    What kind of cheap ass 15 year old speakers do you have that go down to 20Hz?
  • Reply 6 of 11
    Roger_FingasRoger_Fingas Posts: 142member, editor
    20Hz, for the record, is believed to be the lowest frequency humans can hear. Anything under 60 is already sub-bass.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Defining 60 as “sub-bass” seems absurdly high to me: is that an official scientific definition? The bottom string of a bass guitar is 41Hz, the bottom note of a standard piano is 27.5Hz. 60Hz is only just more than two octaves below middle C. 

    And it’s not so much that we can’t “hear” below 20 Hz but that we cease to perceive pitch below that, and hear it as simply a rumble. But like any speakers, there’s a “roll-off” taking place with regard to that perception. Play a chord in the bottom octave of the piano and very few people will be able to discern whether it’s major or minor (I’ve only ever encountered one person who could, and he’s a professional pianist and composer, who at the time he could do it was in his early 20s). Do the same in the middle of the piano and everyone can hear the difference. 
    edited June 13
  • Reply 8 of 11
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,262member
    Defining 60 as “sub-bass” seems absurdly high to me: is that an official scientific definition? The bottom string of a bass guitar is 41Hz, the bottom note of a standard piano is 27.5Hz. 60Hz is only just more than two octaves below middle C. 

    And it’s not so much that we can’t “hear” below 20 Hz but that we cease to perceive pitch below that, and hear it as simply a rumble. But like any speakers, there’s a “roll-off” taking place with regard to that perception. Play a chord in the bottom octave of the piano and very few people will be able to discern whether it’s major or minor (I’ve only ever encountered one person who could, and he’s a professional pianist and composer, who at the time he could do it was in his early 20s). Do the same in the middle of the piano and everyone can hear the difference. 
    Get real. Since when does official science play a realistic part in audio discussions? It's more the domain of pseudo-dick measuring and golden ear claims than 'official science' where practitioners toss (LOL!) around official terms like 'absurdly'.

    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
    And you still didn't respond with what 'cheap ass' 15yro speakers go down to 20 (I assume that 20Hz) and what Nokia headphones go to 18Hz. Or is that as assumption on your part because you perceive a rumble?

    Before giving your examples any credence, I'd prefer to see reviews with official scientific testing of your specific model done in an  anechoic chamber as a baseline. What were those models again?

    It seems to be almost axiomatic the first post to almost every AI article is made to criticize, bag on, and dismiss it. 
  • Reply 9 of 11

    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
    And you still didn't respond with what 'cheap ass' 15yro speakers go down to 20 (I assume that 20Hz) and what Nokia headphones go to 18Hz. Or is that as assumption on your part because you perceive a rumble?

    Before giving your examples any credence, I'd prefer to see reviews with official scientific testing of your specific model done in an  anechoic chamber as a baseline. What were those models again?

    It seems to be almost axiomatic the first post to almost every AI article is made to criticize, bag on, and dismiss it. 

    Well, excuse the fuck out of me for not lurking on the board just waiting for you to challenge me so I can respond right away...

    I have no idea what brand the cheap ass speakers are.  They came in a white box, that I bought at some show somewhere.  The spec sheet for them said 20 Hz though.  And yes, I do remember, because I wouldn't have bought them if they didn't go at least that low.

    As for the Nokia headset, I read it wrong, my Nokia BH-905i goes to 15Hz, not 18.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,262member

    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
    And you still didn't respond with what 'cheap ass' 15yro speakers go down to 20 (I assume that 20Hz) and what Nokia headphones go to 18Hz. Or is that as assumption on your part because you perceive a rumble?

    Before giving your examples any credence, I'd prefer to see reviews with official scientific testing of your specific model done in an  anechoic chamber as a baseline. What were those models again?

    It seems to be almost axiomatic the first post to almost every AI article is made to criticize, bag on, and dismiss it. 

    Well, excuse the fuck out of me for not lurking on the board just waiting for you to challenge me so I can respond right away...

    I have no idea what brand the cheap ass speakers are.  They came in a white box, that I bought at some show somewhere.  The spec sheet for them said 20 Hz though.  And yes, I do remember, because I wouldn't have bought them if they didn't go at least that low.

    As for the Nokia headset, I read it wrong, my Nokia BH-905i goes to 15Hz, not 18.
    Well, in the interest of accuracy (you know that that is, right?) someone else asked first and you apparently failed for whatever reason to respond but didn't pass on the opportunity to edjimicate on the fine points of audiology.

    So you have a manufacturer's spec sheet(s) providing you the frequency response. Truly impeachable sources. I'm sure those extra 3Hz come in handy.

    It really doesn't matter of course but since you brought it up, no I do not excuse the fuck out of you. You made a claim which didn't sound (LOL) credible on its face and the more you said the more of a knob you seemed. So far that hasn't changed, though Nokia might have merit your claim.

    Now I'm off to order my own white box speakers from Cheap Ass. I'm sure someone will be able to provide a pair with a spec sheet stating 10-30KHz +/– .25dB. I'm diggin' this high-end audio thing. Outside of some misplaced oneupmanship, this none of this means anything in the scheme of things.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    macgui said:
    Defining 60 as “sub-bass” seems absurdly high to me: is that an official scientific definition? The bottom string of a bass guitar is 41Hz, the bottom note of a standard piano is 27.5Hz. 60Hz is only just more than two octaves below middle C. 

    And it’s not so much that we can’t “hear” below 20 Hz but that we cease to perceive pitch below that, and hear it as simply a rumble. But like any speakers, there’s a “roll-off” taking place with regard to that perception. Play a chord in the bottom octave of the piano and very few people will be able to discern whether it’s major or minor (I’ve only ever encountered one person who could, and he’s a professional pianist and composer, who at the time he could do it was in his early 20s). Do the same in the middle of the piano and everyone can hear the difference. 
    Get real. Since when does official science play a realistic part in audio discussions? It's more the domain of pseudo-dick measuring and golden ear claims than 'official science' where practitioners toss (LOL!) around official terms like 'absurdly'.

    35 Hz?  Is that right?  That seems absurdly high, given that my cheap ass, 15 year old speakers I'm using now go down to 20, and my Nokia headphones go to 18.
    And you still didn't respond with what 'cheap ass' 15yro speakers go down to 20 (I assume that 20Hz) and what Nokia headphones go to 18Hz. Or is that as assumption on your part because you perceive a rumble?

    Before giving your examples any credence, I'd prefer to see reviews with official scientific testing of your specific model done in an  anechoic chamber as a baseline. What were those models again?

    It seems to be almost axiomatic the first post to almost every AI article is made to criticize, bag on, and dismiss it. 
    Wow somebody got out of the wrong side of the bed this morning. I have no idea what's going on here.
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